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N, 

nils 



CHAPLIN 

Victim of an 
FBI vendetta 

Saturday Review, page 6 



FASHION 

Erotica reviewed 
by lain R. Webb 

Saturday Review, page 30 



RELIGION 


High spirits and 
happy souls 


Weekend, pages 1 am 


WEEKEND 
TV & RADIO 

Section 3 
Pages 16-17 


THE 



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s 


No. 64,506 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


50p 


Reagan, at Oxford, joins the call for action against Serbia 



Ronald Reagan proposed air strikes against Serbia and accused Natoof refusing to “ cross the street” to stop wholesale slaughterwhen he addressed the Oxford Union yesterday. Reagan speech, page 3; Leading article, page 13 

Owen fears a i i 

conflict m Insurers seek bomb 

Bosnia may « 

spillover i*OVPf* S21 TPtV-fl Pt 


By Michael Evans 

NATO was warned yesterday 
lo stan making contingency 
plans in the event of a spread- 
ing Balkan war. Lord Owen, 
co-chairman of the peace con- 
ference on the former Yugosla- 
via. told alliance ambassadors 
in Brussels that he feared that 
the fighting in Bosnia-Herze- 
goyina could sp31 over into 
neighbouring countries. 

Lord Owen was said to have 
described developments as 
“grave and sombre” and told 
the ambassadors the West had 
better be ready to deal with the 
consequences. In London 
Douglas Hogg, the Foreign 
Office minister, warned the 
Serbs against using force in 
Kosovo, where two million 
ethnic Albanians live. Foreign 
Office sources said Mr Hogg’s 
words should not be taken as 
implying a readiness to send 
troops to fight the Serbs. But 
Serbian aggression in Kosovo 
would not be tolerated and the 
UN would have to decide what 
steps should be taken, the 
sources said. 

In Washington, the US 
administration was consulting 
allies on a possible UN resolu- 
tion authorising the use of 
force to stop Serbian violations 
of the no-fly zone over Bosnia. 

Macedonia issue, page 1 1 
Leading artide. page 13 


Births, marriages. 

deaths 

Business — 

Court and Social 

Crossword ......... 

Leading articles - 

Letters 

Obituaries. 

Sport 

Weather — 


..... 14.15 
«... 17-26 

M 

16 

... 13 

13 

15 

.... 27-32 
lb 


By Sarah Bagnaul 
and Nicholas Wood 

j IN THE face of fee most 
sustained IRA campaign since 
the seventies. British insurers 
were trying last night to put 
together a package to 
pressurise fee government 
into underwriting fee costs of 
mainland bombings. 

The decision of large for- 
eign reinsurers to cease offer- 
ing cover from next year to 
insurers such as Commercial 
Union and General Accident 
for claims arising from terror- 
ism in the United Kingdom 
has panicked fee industry and 
deeply concerned the govern- 
ment Downing Street officials 
yesterday threw some light on 
private talks between the in- 
surers and ministers to say 
that the government still want 
ed a commercial solution. It is 
determined to resist die insur- 
ers' pressure. 

The authorities fear feat die 
wrangle has delivered a pro- 
paganda victory to the IRA. 
Police and fee security services 
were deeply dismayed when 
the proposal to withdraw 
cover was first mooted three 
weeks ago. 

The issue is rising rapidly 
up fee Whitehall agenda, wife ' 
the IRA in the midst of a 
concerted bombing campaign 
in fee run-up to Christmas. 
The IRA yesterday admitted 
responsibility for Thursdays 
bombs in Manchester, which 
injured 64 people. 

As forensic specialists sifted 
through wreckage yesterday, 
the city seemed determined to 


■ Ministers are determined to resist 
insurers’ pressure to provide a cash safety 
net for companies whose premises have 
been wrecked by terrorist bomb blasts 





,c L®n 

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return to normal. Streets were 
crowded and shops reported 
that busy pre-Christmas trad- 
ing had largely returned. 

One man injured by flying 
glass in the second explosioin 
was still detained in Man- 
chester Royal Infirmary yes- 
terday but his condition gave 
no cause for concern. 

The bombs are estimated to 
have caused about £13 million 
of damage, including claims 
for the interruption of busi- 
ness: The bomb which devas- 
tated the City of London in 
April £800 million 


worth of damage, more than 
fee total paid by the govern- 
ment during the past twenty- 
four years of bombings in 
Northern Ireland. 

A mainland compensation 
scheme along the lines of the 
one operating in Northern 
Ireland, in which the taxpayer 
meets fee cost of all terrorist- 
inspired criminal damage to 
property above a threshold of 
£220, is not being contemplat- 
ed. That scheme has cost 
about £680 nuQion since 
1969. 

Michael Hesdtine, fee pres- 
ident of the board of trade, is 
expected to hold further talks 
with business l ea der s from 
insurance, retail and property 
interests next week. He will 
then consult the prime minis- 
ter and cabinet colleagues 
about fee terms of a possible 
solution. 

Mr Hesdtine was careful 
yesterday not to rale out some 
form of government assistance 
-while emphasising that his 
prime objective was to find an 
answer in fee worldwide rein- 
surance market He said on 
BBC Television that there was 
“a willingness to discuss these 
matters further”. 

“I am fold by people in fee 
insurance industry that there 
are things certainly that need 


tn be examined. I am also weD 
aware that large risks can be 
covered in the insurance mar- 
ket. Large sums of money are 
at risk and we have to find 
ways in which the market can 
cover those to the greatest 
possible extent" 

This appeared to be a hint 
that ministers are considering 
proposals from John 
Greenway. the Tory MP who 
chairs fee all-party financial 
services committee, for the 
Treasury to prey for claims 
above a set ceiling. 

The Times understands that 
ministers remain deeply reluc- 
tant to bale out the insurers 
and axe engaged in an appar- 
ent game of brinkmanship. 
The government is concerned 
to avoid an open-ended com- 
mitment at a time of tight 
budgets. It is working against 
the dock because, as commer- 
cial insurance policies come 
up for renewal from January 
1. they will cany a terrorism 
exclusion dau.se. Some com- 
panies could face bankruptcy 
as a result of a terrorist 
bombing. 

The possibility of a market 
solution involving govern- 
ment aid was discussed in 
private on Tuesday at a meet- 
ing of insurance industry i 
officials and Neil Hamilton, 
junior minister at the trade 
and industry department 
The proposal discussed was 
that fee market would provide 
insurance up to a ceiling of 
about £250 million and 

Continued on page 2, col 7 

Ulster's £70m ML page 2 



Bush says Somalia 
aid is ‘God’s work’ 

By Martin Fletcher and Michael Evans 


Laroonfc “absolute no** 
to changing position 

Lamont 
rules out 
job swap 

By Nicholas Wood 
POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT 

NORMAN Lamont made 
clear yesterday that he would 
not accept another post in the 
cabinet in a move aimed at 
quashing speculation of a new 
year reshuffle. 

The chancellor, who has 
been under political and me- 
dia pressure since sterling's 
forced exit from the European 
exchange-rate mechanism 
nearly three months ago, said 
that there was “absolutely 
no” other position in govern- 
ment that interested him. 

Although Downing Street 
officials have insisted that 
John Major has given no 
thought to a reshuffle, Tory 
MPs have canvassed possibil- 
ities such as a swap involving 
Mr Lamont and Kenneth 
Clarke. But his interview with 
fee Wall Street Journal was a 
dear sign that he would not 
be party to such changes. Mr 
Lamont appeared to be telling 
his colleagues feat fie would 
either stay as chancellor or 
leave fee government 


PRESIDENT Bush yesterday 
ordered fee sending of up to 
28.000 American troops to 
Somalia to prevent mass star- 
vation in the country. Britain 
also agreed to contribute two 
Hercules transport aircraft for 
fee operation, believed to be 
fee world’s largest armed hu- 
manitarian relief mission. 

In a televised address to the 
nation. Mr Bush called Oper- 
ation Restore Hope “God’s 
work”. He said US troops 
would not stay one day longer 
than necessary and had no 
intention of imposing a polit- 
ical settlement on Somalia. 
However, the troops had been 
authorised to use force to 


safeguard their pwn lives and 
those of innocent Somalis. 

An amphibious task force 
led by the USS Tripoli with 
l .800 marines is anchored off 
Mogadishu. They are expect- 
ed to land by helicopter to 
secure fee airfield and port 
early next week for the arrival 
of fee rest of fee US force. 

The two British planes from 
RAF Lyneham in Wiltshire 
were offered after a specific 
request for assistance from 
Washington. No British 
ground troops will be involved 
in Somalia. 

US troops sent, page 9 
Simon Jenkins, page 12 


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2 HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 



By Matthew d’ancona 

THE NATIONAL Union of 
Students will next week call for 
a two-term academic year and 
for maintenance grants to be 
linked to individual study 
"modules”, rather than rigid 
three-year courses. 

The union is to launch a 
student's charter on Monday, 
intended to trump govern- 
ment plans to impose volun- 
tary membership of the NUS 
in its Further and Higher 
Education Charter, to be pub- 
lished in the new year. The 
NUS policy overhaul is ex- 
pected to recommend a more 
□exible approach to student 
finance in which grants would 


■ Two reports on university education are 
expected to discuss radical changes in the 
academic year and the funding of 
maintenance grants for students 


be awarded on the basis of the 
academic modules students 
signed up for. rather than the 
duration of these their courses. 

Such a system would benefit 
those who take time off from 
their degrees, and would en- 
able students to seek tempo- 
rary jobs between modules, 
already a common practice in 
the United States. It is under- 
stood that the NUS charter 
will also call for compensation 


to be paid to students whose 
grants arrive late, and for foe 
appointment of an education 
ombudsman. 

The shift of policy on stu- 
dent finance, one of the 
union’s doctrinal foundations, 
is the heart of the 
modernisation programme 
laundied by its president. 
Loma Fitzsimons. which will 
be discussed at its first nat- 
ional. council on Wednesday. 


In its most dramatic polity 
review mice foe 1960s, the 
NUS is expected to endorse a 
restructured academic year, 
with students attending univ- 
ersity or college for two of three 
15-week terms. 'The union 
now recognises that twoyear 
"fast-track’* courses are inev- 
itable. as higher education 
expands and the funding 
councils press for more eff- 
icient use of resources. 

The Committee of Vice- 
Chancellors and Principals 
said yesterday that it would 
study foe plans in detail. 
"Modularity is the corning 
thing and linking it with 
funding is a novel idea,” a 
spokesman said. An investiga- 


tion into the future of the 
academic year, headed by 
Lord Flowers, is due to publish 
its interim report in ApriL The 
Universities Funding Council 
did yesterday that NUS sup- 
port for modular courses was 
to be welcomed. “The courted 
is trying to encourage initia- 
tives that increase the flexibili- 
ty in course provision, 
particularly for mature stu- 
dents who might not want the 
** whole of three years' study," a 
;• spokesman said. 

The student diarter sets out 
what are described as a series 
of rights which students 
shoukT be entitled to and 
concludes: "They are based on 
principles which we believe to 


be sound ones: quality, choice, 
equivalence and equal oppor- 
tunities. Thty are not dissimi- 
lar to the principles laid out in 
the citizen’s charter.This char- 
ter is a challenge to the 
government We have set 
down a series of rights for 
individual students together 
with collective enforcement If 
the government tinkers with 
minor alterations, students 
will fed cheated.” 

The union will sell foe 
charter to its memebership as s 
a challenge to the govern- 
ment balancing individual 
rights with collective 
enforcement. 


Bright young things, page 3 


Patient’s charter 

Minister aims 
to cut waiting 
time with new 
GP guidelines 

By Jeremy Laukance, health services correspondent 


PATIENTS will be entitled to 
a rapid response to complaints 
under new standards for gen- 
eral practitioner services an- 
nounced yesterday. 

GPs will also be asked to set 
local standards for their own 
practices, specifying maxi- 
mum waiting times to see a 
doctor in the surgery or to 
contact one by telephone in an 
emergency. 

The standards, which ex- 
tend the patient’s charter to 
primary care and indude 
prompt help with changing 
one’s doctor, were announced 
yesterday by Virginia Bottom- 
ley, the health secretary, and 
take effect next ApriL "We 
have had notable success in 


French 

farmers 

defended 

Continued from page 1 
human spirit of unrelenting 
migration from the country- 
side to the big cities.” France, 
he said, had set others an 
inspiring example of civilised 
values perpetuated and nur- 
tured within an overall cultur- 
al approach to life. 

Those were underpinned, 
he said, “by giving due impor- 
tance to the kind of rural 
traditions without which it 
would be impossible to enjoy a 
way of life that recognises — 
both in the oountiyside and 
the town — the importance of 
elements in our lives which 
enrich and ennoble us, but 
which are not cost-effective in 
strictly economic terms”. 

Quoting sources from 
Adam Smith to Guy de Mau- 
passant, the prince confirmed 
himself to be a less than total 
disciple of faissoz-/aire 
Thatcherite economics, and 
more of a committed envir- 
onmentalist 

"We continue to base our 
economic practices on the 
pursuit of growth, in a man- 
ner which is not only unsus- 
tainable in ecological terms, 
but also incurs a host of other 
costs — growing wealth differ- 
entials, an unhealed divide 
between north and south, a 
horrendous debt burden, and 
the creation of an underclass 
in many industrialised coun- 
tries.” he said. 

□ The prince's remarks struck 
a responsive chord at the 
National Farmers' Union, 
where there is much sympathy 
for French farmers’ fears 
about the impact of a Gatt 
settlement if not always for the 
manner in which they express 
them (Michael Hornsby 
writes). 

David Naish. the union’s 
president, said last nighc “I 
will be seeing the prime minis- 
ter on Monday and will be 
idling him of our concern 
about the effect of agricultural 
policy on the fabric of rural 
life” 

Bumper harvest page 7 
Photograph, page 10 


driving down waiting times 
and improving the quality of 
information available about 
the NHS through foe patient’s 
charter,” she said. “This dev- 
elopment of the diarter will 
help to level up standards in 
primary care to those of the 
best” 

Under the charter, family 
health services authorities wQl 
have two days to find a GP for 
anyone not registered with 
one. They wfll also be required 
to send within foe same time 
details of how. to. change, 
doctors and a list of those in 
foe area to anyone who asks 
for advice. Medical records 
must be transferred within six 
weeks or within two days if 
required urgently. 

Complaints must be ac- 
knowledged within two days 
and cleared within a month-# 
dealt with- mfarffiaHy ror'sSc 
months if they require a 
committee hearing. . Both 
patient and doctor must be 
given monthly progress re- 
ports until foe complaint is 
cleared- 

The patient’s charter cannot 
compel GPs to adhere to 
national standards because 
they are independent contrac- 
tors. However, health authori- 
ties are asked to provide 
guidelines to encourage GPs 
to set out what patients can 
expect. 

As well as covering waiting 
times, arrangements for con- 
tacting a doctor and dealing 
with complaints, there should 
be standards for the way in 
which they pass on results of 
tests, health promotion work, 
facilities for people with child- 
ren and disabled people and 
services for ethnic minorities. 

The British Medical Associ- 
ation said the charter would 
help all GPs reach the stan- 
dard of the best Since the 
patient’s diarter for hospital 
services was introduced last 
April, two-year waiting lists 
have been deared and health 
authorities are working to cut 
waiting lists to 1 S months in 
some specialties. 

Phobia efinic, page 6 



Light of hope: Elina Foric, five, whose home in the village of Kozarac. Bosnia, was burned down, yesterday 
looking forward to a new life. She and her family have been brought to Britain by the Leeds-based charity 
Alert so that Ehna can have a kidney operation 1st AID appeal page 1 1, leading article, page 13 


Heads condemn tests at 14 
as bureaucratic monster 

By John O’Leary, education correspondent 


THE head of the state school 
with the best examination 
results in England led an 
assault by 1 7 leading selective 
schools yesterday on foe gov- 
ernment’s plans for 14 to 16- 
year-olds. 

In a joint letter to The Times 
and other newspapers, foe 
heads echoed many of foe 
criticisms made by indepen- 
dent schools last month of 
testing and curriculum 
changes. They said tests at 14 
were a bureaucratic monster 
in the making and that sub- 
jects such as ait, music and the 
classics were under threat in 
the state sector. 

The criticism came as edu- 


cation ministers were accused 
by Sir Malcolm Thornton. 
Conservative chairman of the 
Commons select committee on 
education, of allowing right- 
wing pressure groups to influ- 
ence education policy unduly. 
Ministerial sources denied 
that Conservative think-tanks 
were dictating policy. 

Keith Howard, head of 
Queen Mary’s Grammar 
School, Walsall which had 
foe best combined GCSE and 
A-level results of all English 
state schools, wrote a month 
ago to Baroness Blatch. foe 
education minister, complain- 
ing that foe new curriculum 
beyond the age of 14 was too 


prescriptive. She replied this 
week that schools had a “sig- 
nificant element of flexibility” 
and should organise the cur- 
riculum to meet their own 
requirements. 

Mr Howard and colleagues 
from other West Midlands 
grammar schools said that 
the curriculum risked becom- 
ing a straitjackeL Statutory 
requirements left virtually no 
time for other subjects. “The 
rich variety which should be 
on offer to all pupils, and 
certainly to academically gift- 
ed pupils, will be under threat 
and could result in an impov- 
erishment of academic provi- 
sion in the maintained sector.” 


Ulster bombs cost 
£70m in past year 

By Edward Gorman. Ireland correspondent 


INSURANCE cover for 
people and buildings as a 
result of terrorist violence has 
not been available in North- 
ern Ireland since the begin- 
ning of the present troubles. 

Compensation claims for 
private or commercial proper- 
ty since 1 968 totals more than 
£650 million, most caused by 
IRA violence. The figure for 
injury is £220 million. 

The most expensive years 
were the mid to late 1970s 
with compensation reaching 
£56 million in 1977. This 
year, IRA explosions in 
Belfast and several larger 
towns are expected to produce 
a combined total of more than 


£70 million. The IRA has 
increasingly focused on what 
it calls "economic targets”, 
planting huge bombs in dty 
centres with foe intention of 
wrecking foe infrastructure in 
foe belief that eventually Brit- 
ain will conclude that it cannot 
afford to continue footing the 
bill 

The compensation system 
in Northern Ireland, which 
requires claimants to obtain a 
certificate from the chief con- 
stable confirming that dam- 
age was caused by organised 
violence, has been the subject 
of considerable criticism over 
delays in the provision of 
funds. 


EC urged to take lead 
on world arms control 

By Michael Evans, defence correspondent 


THE European Community 
must take a leading role in 
forging a new international 
system for controlling the 
spread of arms and dual-use 
technology, a report by a 
research organisation said 
yesterday. 

The EC's five principal arms 
exporters currently account for 
1 9 per cent of world trade in 
“major defence systems’’ and 
1 7 per cent of sales to coun- 
tries in the Third Woiid, 
according to foe 136-page 
report Saferworid. 

The call for tighter EC 
controls on the sale of equip- 
ment that could be used for 
military programmes follows 


the collapse of the Matrix 
Churchill trial during which it 
emerged that ministers and 
civil servants had approved 
foe sale to Iraq of dual-use 
technology such as machine- 
tooling equipment. 

The Saferworid report said 
the EC should draw up a 
detailed list of non-EC coun- 
tries, specifying which should 
be subject to export licence 

restrictions. 

DA ms and Dual-Use Ex- 
ports from the EC, A Common 
Polity for Regulation and 
Control, Safeiwoiid, 82 
Colston Street Bristol £60 
(institutional), £15 
(individuals) 


Protest at 
‘snoop’ 
cameras 

By Paul Wilkinson 

BRITAIN’S largest network 
of dry-centre surveillance cam- 
eras was switched on yesterday 
amid calls for legislation to 
provide strict controls over 
who uses them ' . 

Businesses in. Newcastle 
upon Tyne and the dty coun- 
cil. which have split the 
£300,000 cost between them, 
reject suggestions of snooping, 
saying their aim is to redu c e 
crime. 

But Liberty, the civil liberties 
pressure group, is concerned 
that there are no legal con- 
straints on such systems. “We 
are not against the idea in 
principle.” Alison Vickers, a 
spokesman said. “But at 
present there is no statutory 
regulation. There are no re- 
straints on who operates them, 
who has access to foe video- 
tapes or how tong they are 
kept 

“Would they be used during 

? Dlitical demonstrations? 

hese are matters foe Home 
Office should be addressing as 
more and more of these sys- 
tems come into use.” 

Gordon Allanson. manager 
of Eldon Square shopping 
centre, said visitors no longer 
considered the cameras a 
threat. “Attitudes have 
rhangarf and people will look, 
on the cameras as a benefit 
making them fed safer and 
more comfortable," he said. 

Pictures from the 16 cam- 
eras will be fed to a control- 
room at foe city’s central police 
station. Supt Peter Durham, 
who is charge of the* operation, 
said only one person had 
suggested they might infringe 
cml liberties- 


Anglican shrine bans 
women priests 

The fizst “no go area” for women priests was declared in foe 
Church of England yesterday (Ruth Gledhifl writes). Senior 
c hur c hn ien decided to ban women priests from taking 
services at the Wabingham shrine. England’s premier place 
of pilgrimage. 

More than 25 shrine guardians met in London yesterday 
and agreed on foe ban. They included John Cummer, 
agriculture minister, who resigned from the General Synod 
this week, and Dr Graham Leonard, foe former Bishop of 
London, who plans to join foe Roman Catholic Church. 
Walsingham is a focal point for Anglo-Caiholics, who are 
jeered by protesters each May when they process behind a 
statue of foe Virgin Maty. The shrine also attracts 
thousands of evangelical and liberal Anglicans, as well as 
pilgrims from other denominations. 

The guardians said in a statement: “We do not accept foe 
unilateral decision to ad ro i t women to foe priesthood and 
foocefore women priests wiB not officiate at the shrine.” 

Credo, page 7 

Barracks security alert 

One of Britain's largest military bases was foe target 
yesterday of two suspected shooting incidents- Police raid 
they were keeping an “open mind” about possible terrorist 
activity mCatterick garrison in North Yorkshire in the wake 
of the bombing of Manchester city centre oaTltursday hot a 

massive search was carried out by soldiers and police all (fay. 

In the first incident at about 3am on foe camp's perimeter at 
Waitwith, a sentry fired several rounds at intruders who 
were thought to be armed. Police said they could have been 
poadtera There have been 17 reports of poachers in the area 
recently. Just after day break, a foot was reportedly fired 
from a pasting car dose to foe Hdles barratries, but potice 
believe that it might have been the vehicle backfiring. Thty 
appealed for the driver of a blue Ford Escort to come 
forward. 

Designer’s fatal slip 

Oliver Gregory, a co-founder of Habitat died in a shotgun 
accident when he dipped on wet grass as he shot at binds 
attacking his doves. an inquest was told. Mr Gregory, a 
designer aged 62, was found on the lawn of his home in 
Coffingbourne Duds, Wiltshire, by his wife. Sue, and Fred 
Palmer, a gardener, on November 23. Mrs Gregory told tire 
inquest in Salisbury, Wiltshire, that when she first saw the 
body foe thought it was a tramp. “I came into foe house to 
get Oliver but I could not find faun and it dawned at me that 
the person r had seen was divert L became hysterical and 
rushed out info foe garden. I fomk I must have fainted." 
John Elgar, foe coroner, recorded a verdict of misadventure. 

Jilted lover jailed 

A salesman who raped and tortured his former lover in front 
of her two children was jailed for six years at the Old Bafoy 
yesterday. Judge Neil Denison QC was told how foe jilted 
man drugged foe 2 I-yearold and held her captive in a hotel 
room along with foe children, aged four and one. The 
woman, who had ended foe fouryear relationship three 
weeks earlier, was bound and handcuffed. During repeated 
sexual assaults, foe 3 1-yearokl attacker used an electric 
sten jjnn and at one point held a knife to the baby girl's 
ttirdat to stop her mother screaming. Judge Denison said 
that foe man carried out “a horrifying series of sexual 
assaults designed to humiliate ho". 

Taxman nets records 

Cricket records from 1772-96 have been used to pay an 
inheritance tax demand. The minutes, subscription and 
account books of HamNedon cricket dub, regarded as the 
birthplace of the modem game, will be displayed at 
Hampshire county record office. They belonged to Sir Alan 
and Lady Lobbock. One of her ancestors was a steward at 
the dub and the records were accepted ty the Museums and 
Galleries Commission in lieu of £39,210 tax. Hie 
commission recently accepted a BugattL 

Lorry drivers hijacked 

A lorry driver was yesterday hijacked at gunpoint and taken 
on a five-hour drive fay thieves who stole his vehicle and its 
load, together worth £1 00,000. The driver was about to go to 
sleep when he was attacked in a lorry park near 
Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire. Police found hun on the hard 
shoulder of the M6 nearly 250 miles away. In a separate 
incident hijackers who took a lany driver on a two-hour ride 
in a car boot after stealing his load released him after giving 
him £5 for his tan fare home. 

Doctor blinded wife 

A jealous doctor who blinded his wife by stabbing out her 
eyes in front of their daughter was jailed for 12 years at the 
Ok! Bailey yesterday. The sentence was criticised as too 
lenient by Roohance Haroon-Qadri. 30, who said: “He’s 
sentenced me to a life of darkness.” Mrs Haroon-Qadri, of 
West Norwood, south London, who wanted a divorce from 
her arranged marriage, added: “Pve got life but he’s only 
been sentenced to a short term.” Hassan Qadri 40, 
admitted causing grievous bodily harm with intent 


Insurers join battle 


Continued from page 1 
foal foe government would 
guarantee cover above that 

Present at foe meeting were 
Ian Rushton, chairman of the 
Association of British Insur- 
ers. Peter Ward, general man- 
ager at Commercial Union. 
Ruth Ruliey and Cooper 
Mitchell on behalf of the 
British institute of Insurance 
Brokers Association (BIIBA). 
Martin Taylor, of Hanson, 
and John Poflard on behalf of 
the Confederation of British 
Industry, and Liz Taylor for 
the Association of Insurance 
and Risk Managers. 

Mr Hamilton gave a dear 
message that the government 
was prepared to consider a 
deal. BIIBA and Lloyd's bro- 


kers are meeting to by to agn 
a deal to set up a discretions 
fond to provide initial cover i 
£250 million. 

Who will contribute to tt 
fond is undear. One sugge 
tion is that policy home 
provide half the require 
amount by paying an ettra 
per cent in commercial insfl 
ance premiums, with the r 
mainder provided by tfc 
insurers. If the govemmei 
stuped in. foreign reinsure 
might be enticed back ini 
taking a finite risk. 

The British Retail Conso 
tium, whose members aj 
most exposed to the IR 
campaign, is meeting ne: 
week to agree a package to pi 
to Mr Heseltine. 



Pens write. A Waterman expresses. 

For more than a ce>ttury this distinction has remained constant. 

WATERMAN <$>i 

AmikbU fo# \tadit%4 department i loirs, pm specialists, stationery retailers and jewellers. 

frut your tffjftsr smnrisr pti-tsc ph<in[ oh hu 7557 or oei mr tjm 









THE TIMES SATURDAY PECEMRRR ■; 1992 


HOME NEWS 3 


Investigat or s find that nobody was to blame f or multi-million pound castle blaze 

Spotlight near curtain 
started Windsor 
fire, enquiiy decides 


By Alan Hamilton 

THE lire that destroyed a 
large part of Windsor Castle 
two weeks ago was probably 
caused by a spotlight acciden- 
tally setting light to a curtain 
in the private chapel. The 
official report into the blaze, 
delivered to the Queen and 
made known yesterday, con- 
cludes that no individual was 
to blame. 

Buckingham Palace has 
welcomed the report, saying 
that no further investigation 
into the incident is necessary. 
The palace said it had no 
plans at present to take legal 
action against any contractors 
involved in the renovation 
project under way at Windsor. 

Police, forensic scientists 
and fire officers spent eight 
days investigating the wreck- 
age in the northeast comer of 
the castle’s Upper Ward and 
conducted more than 100 
interviews. Their brief, one- 
and-a-half-page report con- 
firms that the fire started dose 
to die altar of the first-floor 
private chapel. 

Investigators ruled out any 
suggestion that the fire might 
have been started deliberately. 
They also eliminated the pos- 
sibilities of a discarded cigar- 
ette. faults in electrical 
equipment or circuits, or the 
fire having spread from an 
external source. 

The report quashes the 
suggestion in some newspa- 


■ Royal staff will meet fire and heritage 
experts next week to discuss measures to 
prevent a repetition of the Windsor 
disaster at other historic properties 


pegs that the culprit was an art 
restorer who sprayed inflam- 
mable solvent near a hot 
lamp. Art restoration played 
no part in the blaze, the 
investigators stale. 

Palace officials were at 
pains yesterday to dear die 
name of Viola Pemberton- 
Pigott a picture restorer work- 
ing for the royal collection, 
whom some newspapers 
named as having caused the 
fire. “We are pleased that the 
report effectively exonerates 
her and her colleagues in die 
royal collection department of 
arty blame.” the palace said. 
“Her contribution to the sal- 
vage operation in initially 
raising the alarm, and ensur- 
ing that the contents of die 
private chapel were so quickly 
removed to safety, is much 
appreciated.” 

The offending spotlight sit- 
ed at a high level in the 
chapel, is understood to have 
been part of die permanent 
lighting system and to have 
been recently refitted. When 
the fire began die chapel was 
being used to store pictures, 
moved there while redecora- 
tion and rewiring was carried 
out in adjoining apartments. 



and the report suggests that a 
large picture pushed a curtain 
dose to die spotlight 

The pictures had been there 
for three months. Some were 
being restored, but no work 
was being carried out on than 
at die time of the blaze. 

Officials of die royal house- 
hold, the national heritage 
department and fire preven- 
tion experts will meet next 
week, to discuss the report and 
what measures might be 
introduced to prevent a simi- 
lar disaster in other royal 
paiarw and buddings. 

The Fire Protection Associ- 
ation. which represents fire 
insurers, yesterday welcomed 
the Windsor report as “obvi- 
ously very professional and 
thorough”, out regretted that 
the recommendations of its 
report drawn up after the fire 
at Hampton Court in 1986 
had not been fully observed. 
“They put in a very good fire- 
detection system at Windsor, 
but there was a delay in 
calling the fire brigade, and 
they were resistant to die idea 
of sprinklers, which undoubt- 
edly would have contained the 
fire at its point of origin ” the 
association said. 

With the exception of Sir 
William Beeche/s vast canvas 
of George III reviewing his 
troops, a large Regency ride- 
board. a Victorian carpet and 
several pieces of porcelain, die 
important contents of Wind- 
sor were saved. But the dam- 
age to die fabric of the 
building was enormous. 
Some unofficial estimates put 
the cost of reconstruction as 
high as £60 million. The 
palace and national heritage 
department refuse to put a 
figure, or a time scale, on what 
will be one of the largest and 
most challenging heritage res- 
toration projects. 

Diary, page 12 



Night of flames . . . arid the aftermath: the Queen inspects damage after the blaze that began in a chapel 


Sex attack 
sentence 
cut for 
bogus priest 

By A Staff Reporter 

A BOGUS priest jafled for life 
for die sex attack of a mother 
of four in her home had his 
sentence reduced to six years 
by three appeal judges in 
Scotland yesterday. 

They ruled that a life sen- 
tence was “excessive" for the 
attack by John Cronin, 21. 
who posed as a priest to gain 
entry to the home of the 
woman, who was active in 
Tory politics, saying he wished 
to make a donation to party 
funds. 

As they talked. Cronin sud- 
denly attacked the woman 
and subjected her to a severe 
sexual assault. He forced her 
to perform a number of inde- 
cent acts. He also tried to 
choke her and beat her with 
his fists and a poker. 

Cronin, from Tranent, Lo- 
thian, also admitted a number 
of offences in Edinburgh be- 
tween May 2 and May 2 1 this 
year while pretending to be 
Father Sean Mulligan, a par- 
ish priest ftom Limerick. 

He posed as a priest to 
celebrate Mass at St Maty’s 
Roman Catholic Cathedral in 
Edinburgh and later sparked 
a police alert by claiming he 
saw escaped IRA terrorist 
Nessan Quinlivan walking 
along the street 

He committed the sex attack 
while on bail after being 
arrested in connection with 
the alert Lord McCluskey 
jailed Cronin for life at the 
High Court in Edinburgh in 
August At the time the Judge 
said: “In my judgment you are 
highly dangerous to the pub- 
lic” Psychiatric reports stated 
his behaviour was “outra- 
geous. inexplicable and un- 
controllable”. 

But Lord Ccwie, who heard 
the appeal with Lord Murray 
and Lord Wylie, said the 
contents of the psychiatric 
report did not support die 
imposition of a life sentence. 

The judges said the only 
occasion on which Cronin 
showed any sign of placing a 
member of the public at risk 
was during the assault on the 
woman, and that was not 
enough to justify a life 
sentence. 

Cronin, who was described 
as “an evil Walter Mitty” 
character when he first ap- 
peared in, court, smiled and 
waved to the public benches as 
he left the dock. 


Diplomat gets 20 years for smuggling 


By Kate Alderson 


A HIGH-RANKING Thai 
diplomat based in London 
was jailed yesterday for 20 
years for smuggling SO kilo- 
grams of heroin into Heath- 
row airport last August He is 
the most senior diplomat con- 
victed for drug trafficking. 

Piseth Pamarapa. 45. is first 
secretary at the Thai embassy 
in London and a representa- 
tive of the Thai National 
Intelligence Agency, the secret 
service set up with CIA back- 
ing 30 years ago. One of his 
jobs was to link with die 
British security services. 

Pamarapa. part of a drug 
smuggling ring, had hoped to 
bring into Britain heroin 
worth £4 .5 million packed into 
two cases under the cover of 


diplomatic immunity, but was 
arrested at die airport after he 
had walked through the seen 
channel wearing his diplo- 
mat's badge. Immediately 
after his arrest die Thai au- 
thorities waived immunity 
and he was found guilty in 
June of drug smuggling. 

Customs officers, who have 
suspected for some time that 
privilege is still being abused 
to bring drugs into Britain, 
were yesterday delighted at the 
sentence which they see as a 
great deterrent against diplo- 
matic corruption. 

Sentenced at Kingston 
Crown Court. Judge Dewi 
Thomas told Pamarapa: “You 
decided although you had a 
job, a good position and salaty 


to misuse privileges of being 
an honourable diplomat 
These privileges cany an obvi- 
ous and dear obligation.” 

Lord Richard QG counsel 
for Pamarapa. described him 
as a “pious individual who 
had shown no sign of veering 
into crime. “This is a very sad 
case as far as Mr Pamarapa is 
concerned. To quote a biblical 
phrase, 'he was tempted and 
he fefl. and his fall has been 
the greatest" 

Pamarapa was recruited by 
a Pakistani family of drug 
barons headed tty the late 
Omer Khan Yousuf Zia. 
whose son, Dameed Umer 
Khan. 33, a businessman 
from east London, was one of 
two co-defendants found 


guilty with Pamarapa. Khan 
was jailed for 20 years, and 
Surat Sakkaravq, a Thai busi- 
nessman from north London, 
was jailed for 1 7 years. Judge 
Thomas told Khan: “You were 
the right-hand man. immed- 
iately below your father, for 
setting-up and carrying out 
this importation.” 

Before passing sentence, 
Judge Thomas said that drag 
smuggling was “one of the 
worst offences that could be 
committed in our society”. He 
recommended that all three 
defendants be deported after 
serving their sentences and 
ordered the seizure of £7 7,000 
worth of the defendants’ 
money under the Drags Traf- 
ficking Offences Act 19S6 . 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 

The day the 
pound died 

fThe end, when it came, 
was mercifully brief. 
Just before 12.30 on 
Wednesday, September 
16, John Major, 
Norman Lament and 
the inner cabinet 
gathered ai Admiralty 
House. The dining 
room was adorned with 



paintings of great naval 
figures and conflicts of 
a different era— one 
showed the Greek god 
Hercules rejecting, in 
the shape of two female 
figures. Pleasure for 
Virtue. The choice 
feeing the gathering 
was less appetising, but 
just as stark. . J 

A special Insight 
investigation into the day 
the pound dropped out of 

Review, The Sunday 

Times tomorrow 


Reagan wows bright young 
things at the Oxford Union 


By Bill Frost 

CLEARLY determined to 
emphasise intellectual parity 
with his Oxford Union audi- 
ence and a continuous inter* 
est in international affairs. 


■ The former American president 
undimmed by time, collected an oar and 
seemed to want another for the set 


eagan yesterday 
speech laden w 


cultured allusions and pre- 
scriptions for world peace. 

AdaHJwtedging the cheers 
of the crowd with a slightly 
bemused but eternally grate- 
ful smile. Mr Reagan little 
realised how dose he lad 
come to minor disaster. Min- 
utes before his triumphal 
arrival at the podium a chair 
was swapped. “Get another 
quick! There’s paint an this 
one which could leave a nasty 
stain on the seat ofhis 
trousers," said a horrified 
member of the union to an 
anxious minion. 

Mr Reagan seemed genu- 
inefy surprised by the warmth 
of his welcome from the 
bright, young audience. “I am 
delighted to be with you. In 
fact at ray age; Tm delimited 
to be anywhere." he said to 
prolonged, if slightfy ta- 
ttoos, applause. 

The sdMepricating bon 
nip? was the former presi- 
dent’s only digression from a 
five-page text peppered with 
clarion calls to action against 
“tin horn” dictators, despots 
and brigands from Bosnia to 
the Horn of Africa. With the 


aid of twin inconspicuous 
teleprompt screens, he 
quoted T S Eliot, CburddD, 
Arnold Toynbee and Disraeli. 

He also dredged up a 
passage from Hone to vindi- 
cate his tarnished reputation 
on foreign affairs. Beaming 
as his confidence grew, he 
recalled that the German poet 
once said of an ambassador 
“Ordinarily, he is insane, but 
he has luad moments when 
he is only stupid. Some ex- 
perts regarded me that way. 
Whenever I hear such com- 
ments I know I must berm to 
something.” 

As the laughter, not 
altogether land, died down. 
Mr Reagan redeployed his 
serious world statesman look. 
“Let us be frank. Evil Still 
stalks the planet” 

He proposed air strikes 
against Greater Serbia and 
accused Nato of refusing to 
“cross the street” to stop 
wholesale slaughter. Allowing 
Belgrade a free hand to con- 
tinue ethnic deansing in Bos- 
nia was silently to acquiesce 
to mass mu rder. He also 
urged international action in 
Somalia and Sudan — “a 
h umani tarian velvet glove 


backed up by a steel fist of 

militaiy force.” 

The less concerned in the 
audience had begun to as- 
sume a slightly glazed expres- 
sion towards the fifth page of 
Mr Reagan’s address. Others, 
though, dung to every word. 

As Mr Reagan sat down an 
oar was brought to the plat- 
form— a memento of has visit. 
Examining the blade, he 
appeared to ask his hosts 
whether he shouldn't have 
two to make up the set 

Once the Reagan cavalcade 
had left for lunch at Kebie 
College with Lord Jenkins of 
HXQhead. students began dis- 
secting the performance. Tim 
Short, an engineering stu- 
dent, said: “The reception was 
almost as good as we gave 
Eddie the Eagle and the game 
show host Jim Bowen.” 

Thomas Purifoy, a student 
at New College, said: “I come 
from little Rods. Arkansas — 
Bin QnUon's home town. But 
Reagan is stiD the man. His 
nnrit is tmdzmmed; he’s a 
tighter and that was one good 
s p eech from one fine world 

statesman.” 

Photograph, page 1 








THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 


HOME NEWS 5 


A n arbitration panel will avoid lengthy process of taking disputes to court 

British sport seeks to put its house in order 



Not above the law: yesterdays decision to uphold the disqualification of Aliysa at the Oaks, top, came a day after John UzeH right, lost a case in which he accused another 
footballer of assault and Harry Reynolds, centre; was awarded £1 1.8 million damages. Katrin Krabbe, the German sprinter, may take herding test dispute to the English courts 


■ The failure of 
the Aga Khan's 
action emphasises 
the importance of 
fairness by sports 
bodies 


By Charles Woodhouse 

TOP sports administrators 
will need no reminding after 
this week that sport is not 
above the law. But they may 
sleep more easily after the 
failure of the Aga Khan’s 
challenge to the Jockey Chib’s 
disqualification of his 1989 
Oaks winner. Aliysa. in the 
Court of Appeal yesterday. 

The judgment came within 
24 hours of the massive 
$17.67 million (£11.78 mil- 
lion) damages awarded by a 
US court to the 400 metres 
world record holder Harry 
“Butch" Reynolds against the 
International Amateur Athlet- 
ic Federation (IAAF) over a 
drugs-related ban. 

At the same time, Salisbury 
Crown Court acquitted the 
Brentford footballer Gary 
Blissett of causing grievous 
bodily harm to John Uzell of 
Torquay United, who had to 
be operated on for a fractured 
left cheek bone and eye socket 
floor last year after a dash for 
the ball. English courts appear 
to trust more than their Ameri- 
can counterparts in the fair- 
ness of sporting organisations’ 
disciplinary procedures. 

The Jockey Club case 
emphasises again the impor- 
tance of sports bodies acting 
fairly and reasonably and 
within the terms of their own 
constitutions and disciplinary 
procedures. If they do so (and 
it is a big if), then as private 
bodies, albeit with powers that 
affect millions, the English 
courts will not subject their 
decisions to judicial review. 

In the Court of Appeal die 
Master of the Rolls, Sir Thom- 
as Bingham, accepted that 
while in many ways the Jockey 
Club’s powers may be 
described as public, they were 
in no sense governmental. 

For the Aga Khan. Sydney 
Kentridge QC had argued 
that the Jockey Chib’s monop- 
olistic position meant it crm- 
trolled not just a sport but an 
industry. Accordingly, its deci- 
sions should be subject to 
judicial review in the same 
way as for those of govern- 


ment departments, local au- 
thorities and other statutory 
bodies. 

For the Jockey Club, Patrick 
Mflmo QC had argued that its 
disciplinary committee was no 
more performing a public 
duty than an umpire deriding 
whether a ball was tampered 
with. 

He argued successfully that 
there were no grounds for 
distinguishing the Jockey 
Club's powers in raring from 
other domestic controlling 
sports bodies such as die Lawn 
Tennis Association, the British 
Board of Boxing Control and 


the Football Association. Un- 
less successfully appealed in 
the House of Lords, yester- 
days decision should reassure 
national and international 
sports bodies about the reluc- 
tance of the English courts to 
interfere with and second- 
guess their derisions. 

Just over two years ago die 
IAAF had its drug rules and 
procedures challenged in the 
High Court by a Swiss runner. 
Sandra Gasser. She had ar- 
gued two points. Fust that the 
IAAF rules weife an unreason- 
able restraint of trade because 
they imposed some absolute 


offence rather than one de- 
pending on the girilt of the 
athlete. This argument was 
rejected by Mr Justice Scott, 
with her second argument 
that there were procedural 
irregularities relating to her 
drug testing which amounted 


her after she had tested posi- 
tive for drugs. Against this 
background of litigation, Brit- 
ish sports bodies have been 
actively working to put their 
houses in order. Although not 
strictly part of the requirement 
of natural justice, it is now 


right of appeal to an indepen- 
dent tribun aL The word inde- 
pendent needs to be under- 
lined, to ensure that those who 
hear the case have had no 
previous connection with ft 
and no bias or prejudice. 

As a further measure to 
ensure that sports disputes on 
matters such as dope testing 
and eligibility derisions avoid 
going to court the Central 
Council of Physical Recreation 
(CCPR) is setting up a British 
Sports Arbitration Panel 
(BSAP). The intention is to 
resolve sporting disputes in- 
house, rather than subjecting 


them to expensive and time- 
consuming ordeals in the 
courts. It was 1989 when the 
Aga Khan's Aliysa won the 
Oaks. 

Those familiar with the 
growth of alternate dispute 
resolution in other specialist 
areas will not be at all sur- 
prised that at long last British 
sport should within the next 
few months have in place its 
own arbitration paneL 
□ Charles Woodhouse is a 
lawyer specialising in sport 
matters. 


Appeal rejected, page 28 


Ministers 
rethink 
rights of 
immigrants 

By Arthur Leathley 

POLITICAL STAFF 

MOUNTING pressure from 
Tory backbenchers has forced 
the government to reconsider 
plans to curb the number of 
Immigrants and asylum seek- 
ers entering Britain. Conser- 
vative MPs protesting at 
proposals to abdlish die appeal 
rights of visitors refused entry 
to Britain claimed yesterday 
that more colleagues have 
joined the campaign. 

Up to 20 Conservative MPs 
are reported to have voiced 
opposition to a clause in the 
asylum and immigration ap- 
peals bOL which they claim 
will deny thousands of genu- 
ine applicants the right to visit 
their families in Britain. 

The bQl takes away the 
appeal rights of visitors and 
students applying to stay in 
Britain for less than six 
months. Charles Wardle, the 
immigration minister, met a 
delegation of Conservative 
M Ps. many representing seats 
with large ethnic minority 
populations, to discuss the 
likelihood of amending clause 
nine of the b3L He is exposed 
to announce a derision on 
Tuesday during the bill's com- 
mittee stage. 

They are worried that the 
removal of appeal rights 
might lead to corruption 
among high commission 
clearance officers, who could 
be confident that their deri- 
sions on immigration applica- 
tions would not be re- 
examined. The minister ruled 
out substantial relaxation of 
the bifi to allow extensive 
appeal procedures in Britain, 
but MPs are optimistic that he 
may offer a safety net by 
allowing an appeal process at 
high commission level. 

The government believes 
the bill's tighter regulations 
will cut the number of immi- 
gration appeals and help to 
dear the backlog, which 
reached 2 7.000 last year. 

Mr Wardle has also been 
forced to offer the possibility of 
concessions to stave off poten- 
tial defeat in the Commons 
standing committee dial is 
examining the WL The minis- 
ter freed cross-party opposi- 
tion on the issue of giving 
unaccompanied- children ap- 
plying for asylum the right to 
be represented when being 
interviewed by immigration 
officials. 


to breaches of natural justice, generally recognised that to 
MrJustkeSconsaid they were deal effectively internally, 
not and there was no sports bodies must have an 
unfairness. appeal procedure as an essen- 

However, Katrin Krabbe, rial safety valve. Thus, where a 
the German sprinter, is con- ' doping offence has taken 
sid '-ng coming to the Eng- place, disciplinary proceed- 
lish -courts if the IAAF ..mgs following a suspension 
supports the German athletics wfll lead to a disciplinary 
authorities’ four year-ban on committee hearing, with the 


ITV loses programme rights 


By Meunda WnrsTocK. media correspondent 


ITV is to challenge rules 
imposed yesterday by the Of- 
fice of Fair Trading that could 
threaten the quality of its 
shows by restricting its owner- 
ship of programme rights. 

Unless the Monopolies and 


Mergers Commission over- 
turns the ruling, ITV com- 
panies win be prevented from 
acquiring options to produce 
further series of any erf its big 
hits, from London's Burning 
to Coronation Street. As die 


OBITUARIES 1992 

The good, the bad and the fascinating: 
More than 140 of the most interesting and 
readable obituaries published in The Times 
this year, now in book form. 

With 320 pages and 180 illustrations. 

"Here is plenty for anyone who has the 
honesty to admit that next to oneself nothing 
in life is more interesting than other people s 
fives.” Alistair Cooke 

This illustrated record 
celebrates the lives of such 
notables as Marlene 
Dietrich (left). Robert 
Moriey (right), Isaac 
Asimov, Francis Bacon. 

Lord Cheshire VC and 
many more . . . 

To older your copy of The Times Obituaries 1992, 
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new rules do not apply to the 
BBC, Channel 4 or BSkyB. 
any rival broadcaster wfll be 
able to bid against the 
channel for the rights to 
broadcast second and third 
runs of ITV-funded and pro- 
duced programmes. 

“This will put ITV at a 
massive disadvantage against 
all other UK channels,” Greg 
Dyke, chairman of the ITV 
Association and chief execu- 
tive of LWT. said. "We would 
be surprised if this could be 
described as fair trading in 
any riicumstances. This is a 
charter for channels relying on 
secondary products and pick- 
ing off the best of ITV.” 

ITV wfll also be barred from 
buying programme rights 
lasting longer than five years 
with an option for a further 
two. BBC, Channel 4 or 
BSltyB retain rights for unlim- 
ited periods. 

Andrew Quinn. I TV’s chief 
executive, said that the ruling 
would mean “one or two years 
of total instability”. It would 
encourage the channel to 
spend up to 30 per cent less on 
original productions. 

Mr Dyke said that the 
ruling would deter ITV com- 
panies from investing in ex- 
pensive productions, whether 
made in-house or by indepen- 
dent producers. “ITV will 
never pay 100 per cent for any 
programme again, so it’s hard 
to see where the funding wfll 
come from for expensive 
productions such as London’s 


Burning” He said that ft 
could ultimately threaten the 
British production industry. 

Hie OFT. charged by the 
1990 Broadcasting Act with 
ensuring that ITVs network 
commissioning arrangements 
are fair and competitive, ruled 
that the ten-year duration and 
exclusivity of rights sought by 
ITV was anti-competitive and 
would put independent pro- 
ducers at a disadvantage. Sir 
Bryan Caisberg, the office’s 
director-general, said that de- 
nying rival broadcasters access 
to secondary broadcasting 
rights “is intended and likely 
to restrict competition”. 

ITV plans to appeal to the 
monopolies commission next 
week against Sir Bryan's deci- 
sion. The Independent Tele- 
virion Commission will also 
consider an appeal. A com- 
mission enquiry would last 
about six months, during 
which time ITV could contin- 
ue commissioning under exist- 
ing rules. It could then lockup 
long-term rights to any pro- 
gramme commissioned before 
a final ruling. 

“The ITV system outlined in 
this document is not the 
system individual companies 
bid for when applying for their 
licences and it this comes into 
effect companies might wdl 
wish to call into question their 
licence terms.” Mr Dyke said. 
ITV companies face an annu- 
al bfll from the Treasury of 
almost £500 million after last 
year's blind-bid auction. 


Channel 5 takes off 


By Our Media Correspondent 


CHANNEL 5 seems likely to 
begin broadcasting in London 
next autumn after Thames 
Television, the sole bidder, last 
night met its deadline to 
assure the Independent Tele- 
vision Commission that its 
binding was in place. 

Negotiations with potential 
shareholders were concluded 
yesterday just hours before the 
5pm deadline, but Thames 
declined to reveal its partners, 
saying only that "foe necessary 
information” had been deliv- 
ered to the regulator. 

Few industry sources had 
expected Thames to find the 
financial backing to launch 
the channel: or. after months 


of failed negotiations; that 
Channel 5 would be awarded 
to anyone. The ITC will make 
its derision on December 1 7. 

Thames and Moses 
Znaimer, the founder of To- 
ronto’s ineverant CityTV, 
plan to build a group of 
localised CityTV stations, be- 
ginning in London next au- 
tumn. then Manchester in 
' 1994 and other cities to fol- 
low. it would broadcast 24- 
hour trews. films and music. 

Pearson, publisher of The 
Financial Times and a share- 
holder of BSltyB, is under- 
stood to be one of Thames’ 
partners. There are believed to 
be two other investors. 



By training 
one we’re 
giving a better 
^ quality of 
life to both. 



In many developing countries 
horses, ponies and mules are not pels, 
but working animals who provide a 
lifeline for their owners. 

Most, however, are undernourished, 
overburdened and in desperate need 
of proper footcare. It is not that their 
owners are being crueL They have just 
never been told about equine cart 
That is why ILPH, as the world’s 
leading equine charity, is conducting 
farrier training programmes throughout 
Mexico, Jordan and Morocco. 

By taking local young men and 
teaching them the basic skills, the 
whole community can benefit 


Firstly, the men have a real career 
to pursue. They, in turn, are able to 
train others to do the same job and, 
more importantly, to show the owners 
how to keep their animals’ feet healthy. 

Consequently, the number of 
lame and injured equines reduces, 
their productivity increases and the 
people are able to earn themselves a 
better standard of Eving. 

In the last three years we trained 
over one hundred and twenty men. to 
the next three, our target is over three 
hundred. 

Please lend us your support and 
help us to reach that target. 



lira Gen. Manager. HQ ILPH, Anne CoMn~| 
House, Snetterton, Norfolk, NR16 2LR. 1 

ID Please send me more information. 

]□ I wish to make a donation of S 

i and 1 enclose a chequtyPO made payable 

I to ILPH". 

I wish to pay by credit card. Please debit 
c my Acces smsa/American Express ca rd. 

I Cart number m 


mrr 


I Expiry date 

Signature 


(Name 



(Address 



1 

Postcode 



SSaOMfB7rMk2BS65g FUMKDKS etrr TTT3 

I THE INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR THE 

[PROTECIIONOFJHO^Bj 


The ILPH is working 












— scan 


I * 


i ; i KDA 


6 HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1902 


Irish minister predicts 
poll deadlock will 
drag on till Christmas 


By Edward Gorman, Ireland correspondent 


A NEW Irish government 
may not be formed until after 
Christmas, a senior member 
of the outgoing administra- 
tion said yesterday. 

Bertie Ahem, who contin- 
ues as finance minister pend- 
ing agreement on a new 
coalition following last week’s 
election, said in Dublin that 
he expected negotiations to 
continue for more than three 
weeks. Mr Ahem, whose 
Fianna Ffiil party lost ten seats 
and looks unlikely to remain 
in power, did not believe, 
however, that political instabil- 
ity was exacerbating the diffi- 
culties of the Irish currency. 

The caretaker administra- 
tion run by Albert Reynolds, 
the outgoing prime minister, 
wifi represent Ireland at the 
European Commission sum- 
mit in Edinburgh. 

Nevertheless, if Mr Ahern’s 
analysis is right, Ireland will 
be effectively without a govern- 
ment to cope with continuing 
assaults on the punt and 
speculation that a devaluation 


is inevitable. The delay may 
also affect the next budget, due 
at the end of January. 

Mr Allan's comments 
came as the Irish Labour party 
continued its negotiations 
with Democratic Left, part of 
its effort to form a centre-left 
coalition with Fine Gad. The 
possibility of such a coalition 
depends to a large extent on 
the outcome of what is be- 
lieved to be the longest dection 
count in Irish history, in die 
Dublin South Central con- 
stituency. 

The third full recount to 
decide whether the fourth seat 
in the constituency should go 
to Eric Byrne of Democratic 
Left or Ben Briscoe of Fianna 
Fdil was expected to be con- 
cluded last night after nine 
days of counting at the Royal 
Dublin Society. The Indicar 
tions were that Mr Briscoe 
may win the seat by as tew as 
four votes. If the final result is 
very dose, either one of the 
parties may petition the High 
Court to settle the matte - . 


which could drag tire final 
decision into next week. 

A win for Mr Byrne would 

give Democratic let a total of 
five seats, which would be 
enough to give a coalition of 
FmeGaeL Labour and Demo- 
cratic Left command of the 
Ddfl. 

So far John Bruton, the Fine 
Gael leader, has ruled out the 
possibility of entering any 
government involving Demo- 
cratic Left. Mr Bruton, who 
begins his own coalition dis- 
cussions with the Progressive 
Democrats this weekend, has 
cited the opposition of the 
small Marxist party to the 
Maastricht treaty as the main 
obstacle. 

He has repeatedly said that 
he wishes to lead a three-way 
coalition of Fine Gad, Pro- 
gressive Democrats and lab- 
our. The Labour party, 
however, remains determined 
to press ahead with its negotia- 
tions with Democratic Left 
and a joint platform may be 
agreed by Monday. 



Sex abuse 
‘almost run 
of the mill’ 


i 


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I 


The case of a father jailed for 
using his young dau ghte r as a 
plaything for perverts has 
been described by Lord Justice 
Watkins as “almost run of the 
mill". 

Lord Justice Watkins and 
two other Coun of Appeal 
judges cut to 12 years the 
man’s sentence for “mon- 
strous” sex offences against 
the girl when she was aged 
between four and eight- The 
man, 46, who cannot be 
named, was jailed for life at 
Manchester Crown Court on 
December 6 last year for 
unlawful sex. aiding and abet 
ting unlawful sex and bug- 
gery. Orgies also involved the 
mother, who received a six- 
year jail sentence, and grand- 
parents. 


•-.-n for j 
,t-j: »r 
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urn-Wi 

at'tfi m 

If 

i'f 


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“Tliere are many cases now- 
adays where wholesale abuse 
of chfldren by parents have to 
be dealt with,” he said. “Al- 

j't'i ■ 

i ” - 

1 


though it may seem strange to 

■v • 



say this, it is not an exceptional 
or rare case. It is almost a run 


m 

y ■ 

of the mill case, although a 

serious example.” 

-* ' • 

*«PRP 


Fistful of gold: Roger Mintey’s find of coins with a face value of £120 could fetch him £150,000 

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(NOV^ ISN'T THAT A GREAT PACKAGE.) 


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treasure 
up for sale 


Biyan Norman. 53. a City fi- 
nancial expert of Much 
Hadham. Hertfordshire, won 
£883,654 agreed damages in 
the High Court for being de- 
prived of his £1 50,000 a year 
income when he suffered head 
injuries in a head-on collision. 


By Sarah Jane Cbeckland 

ART MARKET ' 
CORRESPONDENT 


Fire on feny 


AN ACCOUNTANT who 
spends his weekends search- 
ing for hidden treasure is 
likely to earn £150,000 next 
week when he sells a hoard of 
1 5th century coins he found in 
a Geld near Frigate. 

Roger Mintey made his 
discovery— said by the British 
Museum to be the largest 
collection found once 1351 to 


A fire caused by an electrical 
wiring fault broke out on a 
Sealink feny sailing from Di- 
eppe to Newhaven. Twenty- 
four crew members were 
treated for smoke inhalation, 
but the 12 passengers on 
hoard were not affected. 


Students riot 


be property recorded — at the 
end of along day trudging the 
countryside. The field had 
been scoured by rivals, and he 
was just about to give up when 
he “got an enormous response 
from the ground". 

The hoard contained 136 
grid and 6,567. silver:. coins 
weighing 50Ibs, with -a total 
face value of £120 — a fortune 
in those days. Mr Mintey*S 
previous finds had been fiinit- 
ed to a couple of coins. 

He then went through the 
official procedure according to 
the English law of treasure 
trove. He registered his discov- 
ery with his local police sta- 
tion, which referred him to the 
coroner’s court After a hear- 
ing lasting 90 minutes, a jury 
pronounced the coins trea- 
sure, whereupon Mr Mintey 
gave the British Museum the 
first option to buy his find. 
Barrie Cook, the museum’s 
expert, selected 300 pieces, 
arid negotiations are under 
way to agree their market 
value. 

The remainder of the coins 
will be sold at Glendinings. of 
Blenheim Street, London WI, 
on Tuesday. 

□ The Royal Opera House’s 
hppe of raising up to £1 50,000 
by selling an autographed 
manuscript of an opera by 
Donizetti were dashed, when it 
failed to sell at Sotheby's. The 
manuscript for “EKzabetta” 
had been haded as a major 
find when it was unearthed 
recently in the Music Library 
of the opera house. 


Mushirul Hasan, a professor 
Ur Delhi whose comments 
supporting Salman Rushdie 
sparked riots that dosed his 
university for three months, 
was taken to hospital yesterday 
after Muslim students at- 
tacked him with knives on his 
first day back at work. 


Chef fined 


Raymond Blanc, owner of Le 
Manotr aux Quaf S arsons, 
was banned from driving for 
six months and fined £350 
after being caught speeding 
twice in five weeks. He drove 
at 130mph in his BMW to a 
meeting in London and at 
95mph in a 50mph zone. 


Osborne sale 


The playwright John Osborne 
is placing for sale the original 
handwritten manuscript of 
Look Back in Anger, which 
was first produced in 1956. It 
is expected to fetch £30,000 to 
£40,000 at Sotheby’s in 
London on December 14. 


Briton’s plea 


Paul Ride, the Briton serving a 
seven-year jail term in Iraq, 
has written to Ken Bates, the 
chairman of Chelsea football 
dub, asking him to persuade 
the prime minister to press for 
his release so he can return to 
watch Chelsea play. . . 


Last pickings 


Mike and Lorna Delanoy wOl 
dose the Fenland Farm Mus- 
eum near Ely, Cambridge- 
shire, tomorrow after 23 years 
and 85,000 visitors. 


Clinic helps phobics 
unbutton their fears 


By Jeremy Laurance, health services correspondent 


THERE is no fear so compel- 
ling as that which is unex- 
plained, according to Michael 
Whitenburgh. One woman is 
so terrified of buttons that she 
has had them removed from 
her dothes and replaced with 
Velcro fastenings 
A 60-ycar-old retired post 
office worker has not seen in 
the new year for 35 years 
because of her fear of bag- 
pipes. “If I hear ‘MuD of 
Kmtyre*. I go to pieces,” she 


Both were among 1,700 
people who contacted Mr 
Whitenburgh’s phobia clinic 
in Liverpool for help in just 
one month, prompting him to 
launch National Phobia 
Awareness week. “We wanted 
people to know they don’t 
have to live with a phobia. We 
can cr ack them." Mr Whiten- 

burgfa said. 

A young man treated at the 
clinic wanted to join the navy 
but suffered from an irratio- 
nal fear of brushes. Mr 
Whitenburgh, who describes 
himself as a psychoanalyst, 
traced the fear to an experi- 
ence In his early teens when 
he had had a crew cut and was 
teased because his hair stood 
up like a scrubbing brash and 


his ears stock out tike taxi 
doors. 

“We’ve bad a woman with a 
phobia of haUcocks," Mr 
Whitenburgh said. “If anyone 
lifts the cover off a dsten, die 
goes into a flat spin. We’ve 
had people with fears of 
waterfalls, dwarfs. Punch and 
Judy, as well as the com- 
moner ones of flying and 
claustrophobia.” 

Some phobias create more 
serious problems, such as the 
games phobia suffered by a 
girl aged 6, who was so 
terrified of PE at school that 
she had nightmares. After she 
had refused to attend games 
classes for a year, her 
headteacher said that the 
national curriculum was 
being breached and warned 
her parents that he might 
have to expel her. 

Some phobias turn out to 
be fataL Adeton Adegoke. a 
student nurse, was ternffedof 
dogs and fefl into a canal in 
east London and drowned last 
summer trying to avoid one. 

One of the moa widespread 
phobias, however, is fear of 
the Channel tunneL “Dear edd 
British Rail will keep me in 
business, ” Mr Whitenburgh 
said. 



4- . I 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


HOME NEWS 7 


Fanners reap bumper harvest 
I from Britain’s ERM exit 


BRITAIN'S farmers can look 
frtward to substantially high- 
et incomes next year in spite 
of the recession and cuts in 
production subsidies imposed 
ifider the reform of the Euro* 
fpn Community’s common 
agricultural policy (CAP). 

ITheir relative good fortune, 
al wen as the lack of a Gallic 
tradition of peasant revolt, 
hups to explain why the 
yfomen of England are not 
d living their tractors into the 
scfcets or dumping manure on 
thl doorstep of John Gum- 
mrr. the agriculture minister. 

"he immediate reason why 
fa. mere are cushioned against 
th nation's economic woes is 
th sharp devaluation of the 
pc ind since its suspension 
fn n the European exchange- 
rale mecharusm in Sep- 
tember. That factor, and other 
cfinges to the ECs arcane 
“green currency" system, are 
likely i by next month to give 
farmers an 18 per cent in- 
crease in the subsidies that 
form a large part of their 
income, even after allowing 
for me mini-surge in sterling's 
value in the past week 
Fred wheat should be fetch- 
ing £140 a tonne, compared 
wifri the £120 farmers were 
expecting last June when the 
CAP reform was agreed; pay- 


By Michael Hornsby, agriculture correspondent 

ments for leaving land fallow 
under the set-aside scheme 
will be about £100 an acre 
instead of £86; and compensa- 
tion f° r cuts in Support prices 
will be £57-£58 an acre, up 
from £48. 


Jim Ward, head of agricul- 
tural research at SaviDs, foe 
estate agents, said: The im- 
mediate future is looking pret- 
rosy. Some high-yielding 
may still suffer loss of 


income under foe CAP re- 
form, fait anyone growing 2.9 
tonnes an acre or less, which 
covets most farmers, should 
deariy be better off." 

EC faxm subsidies are fixed 
in European currency units 
and then converted into nat- 
ional . currencies at special 
“green" rates that lag behind 
real currency movements. 
Ftom next month, with foe 
advent of the single European 


HOW STERLING DEVALUATION HAS 
BOOSTED FARMERS’ INCOME 



market, the “green” pound 
will be brought fully into line 
with the real pound and 
adjusted as necessary every 
month. 

That means that any contin- 
uing fall in the value of 
sterling will translate almost 
immediately into higher subsi- 
dies for British farmers. Con- 
versely, if the pound goes up. 
foe sterling value of subsidies 
will come down, but the 
pound would have to make a 
dramatic recovery to wipe out 
all foe depreciation of the past 
three months. 

Even without foe devalua- 
tion bonus, with prudent cost- 
cutting foe average arable 
farmer should notice no loss of 
income under the CAP re- 
form, says a survey of 390 
farms in eastern England by 
foe department of land econo- 
my at Cambridge University. 

The study estimates that an 
average-sized farm of 467 
acres will be making almost 
foe same profit in real terms in 
1 995-6, after two years of CAP 
reform, as in 1990-1. 

□ Report on Farming in the 
Eastern Counties of England 
1990-1 (Department of Land 
Economy. 16-21 Silver Street 
Cambridge CB3 9EL: £1 2.50) 

Royal support page 1 



Birthday stroll; Father Francis McLachlan. who celebrated 
his hundredth birthday yesterday, taking his daily walk in 
the grounds of Belmont Abbey. Hertfordshire. Fr 
Me Lachlan, who is believed to be the world's oldest 
Benedictine monk, marked the occasion by helping at his 


own celebratory Mass, watched by members of his family 
from Paris. Fr McLachlan, who was bom at Hackney, east 
London, entered the order at Belmont in 1920. He retired in 
1976, after teaching and working in Lancashire. Cumbria, 
Hereford and Worcester. Merseyside and ComwalL 


Royals reflect 
our own image 

The Rev Jonathan Sedgwick 


T his year 
has been a 
bad one for 
the royal family. 

Yet I believe we 
are mistaken in 
assuming that its 
events tdl us pri- 
i manly about the 
'state of the mon- 
'archy. I suspect 
they say rather 
about us. 
ne of the earii- 
examples of the shifting 
ids of pubtic -opinion 
imes in foe Christian Holy 
'eek stories. 

Jesus made a triumphal 
ttty into Jerusalem but the 
:lebi 



Sent 

'celebrations were 


short- 
lived. and largely die same 
'crowd would bay for His 
blood days later. It was as a 
projection of their aspira- 
tions that they cheered, and 
it was their disappointment 
that He was not what they 
(would have Him be that 
(turned them against Him. 

At work in foe relation- 
ship between us and our 
jublic figures is foe projeo- 
ion of our needs and fears 
>n to them, and it is most 
rue of the monarch. What 
lormally breaks down this 
me- way projection is real 
rontact. and most of us are 
lenied this. 

Like the hosannas that 
greeted Chrisfs entry into 
ferusriem. the fairytale 
(monarchy that seemed so 
fcecure in foe early eighties 
tau at least in part our 
ki instruction. It was our 
desire to have ideal, beauti- 
ful rich and romantic fig- 
ures that created an image 
fo- the Prince and Princess 
of Wales. Just as it was the 
destructive desires of foe 
cuwd that crucified Jesus, 
« it is our desire to pry into 
ne privaty of others, our 
ip petite for scandal and our 
viliingness to cast off im- 
ages we have tarnished that 
threatens the monarchy. 

The royal family has 
something to tell us that is 
probably more important 
than the endless speculation 


into their well- 
being. They re- 
flect something 
bade to us about 
our health as a 
nation. They 
show us to be 
increasingly pre- 
occupied by the 
misfortunes of 
others and un- 
able to apply any 
standards of 
compassion and 
rationality to a series of 
personal setbacks. 

Because we live in a world 
in which puWictastes are in- 
creasingly volatile and influ- 
ential. we have a corres- 
pondingly greater respons- 
ibility to take care of our 
institutions. Destruction 
has a corrupting life of its 
own. Before we can see what 
has happened, we may have 
damaged something pre- 
cious and creative. 

C hrist gives hope, for 
the end of the Holy 
Week story is that, 
however great our destruc- 
tive effort, the creativity of 
God and foe power of love 
cannot be quenched by it It 
asserts that, at every point, 
there is chance to turn bade 
and co-operate with foe 
creativity of love. 

Perhaps someone does 
need to expose foe weak- 
nesses of the monarchy, and 
ask questions about the 
inequalities it represents 
and foe snobbery it may 
encourage. However, it is 
dear that if foe monarchy 
were to be destroyed it 
would not be by republican 
idealists; it would be by the 
rich, foe disenchanted, the 
cynical and the opportunis- 
tic Above afl, it would be 
destroyed by our weakness- 
es and destructive urges. 

□ The author is fellow and 
dean of divinity at Magda- 
len Colle ge, Oxford 

Weekend section; 
High spoils, page 1 
At your service, page 9 


This man has just had 
a HERNIA operation! 

(Only 90 Minutes before the photo) 

At The British Hernia Centre , our top 
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Painlessly performed now in under 

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8 OVERSEAS NEWS 


1 THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER S 1992 ‘ 







General pledges to ‘meet fire with fire’ 

Nineteen whites hurt 
in Cape cafe blast 

From Michael Hamlyn in Johannesburg 


NINETEEN whites were hurt 
when a bomb exploded at the 
Spur restaurant in Queens- 
town in the Eastern Cape, a 
crowded fast-food caffe just 
before midnight. Eight people 
were kept in hospital, of whom 
five were seriously injured. 

Following hard on the at- 
tack. General Johan van der 
Merwe, the country’s police 
chief, said that his men “will 
meet fire with fire'*, and he 
warned the Azanian People's 
Liberation Army (Apia), which 
is being blamed for the bomb- 
ings. that “any member of 
Apia who commits acts of 
aggression against the people 
of South Africa wiD be severely 
dealt with". 

At the same time, three days 
of talks between the African 
National Congress and the 
South African government 
ended with a bland statement 
in bureaucratic language that 
both sides recognised the need 
for a speedy movement to a 
democratic form of govern- 
ment and that efforts must be 
made to resume the Conven- 


tion for a Democratic South 
Africa (Codesa) in a more 
representative form. 

General van der Merwe was 
given explicit backing for his 
stand against Apia by Presi- 
dent de Klerk, who, chatting to 
reporters after a meeting with 
Edouard Balladur. a former 
French finance minister, said: 
“We will not stand terrorism.” 
He said that the government 
would act strongly to curb die 
violence, adding that the Apia 
action would have a profound 
effect on discussions with the 
Pan Africanist Congress. Apia 
is die aimed wing of the PAC 

An dries Treumicht. the 
right-wing Conservative Party 
leader, called for the banning 
of file PAC in the aftermath of 
the first bomb attadc. in King 
William’s Town at the week- 
end, in which two white 
couples died and 17 people 
were injured. The hardline 
Herstigte national party has 
gone further and called for the 
immediate arrest of the PACs 
leadership. The PACs youth 
wing replied that any attempt 


to carry out such action would 
lead to the deaths of more 
whitepeople. 

In fact the chances of any 
serious white backlash are not 
large. The Nazi-style Afrika- 
ner Weerstandsbegweging 
(A WB or Afrikaner Resistance 
Movement), led by the faintly 
ludicrous Eugene Terre 
Blanche, is at present suppos- 
edly carrying out protection 
patrols on me border with 
TranskeL The only result so 
far has been an accusation 
that a blade man was beaten to 
death when he fen foul of an 
AWB commando. 

Both fiie Queenstown bomb 
attack and fiie assault on the 
golf dub party in King Wil- 
liam's Town took place m fiie 
neck ofland that separates the 
so-called independent Xhosa 
homelands. Transkei and 
CiskeL 

The PAC armed wing has 
not hitherto been highly re- 
garded as a fighting force. 
However, some of its soldiers 
are now said to have been 
given training in Libya. 


Welcome home: Blandino Mones, left, greets a friend after be and five UN colleagues were freed by guerrillas 


Hostages 
tried to 
flee Khmer 
Rouge 

FROM AFP 
IN PHNOM PENH 

SIX United Nations peacei 
keepers held hostage t by 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas since 
Tuesday said that they tried to 
escape twice, but they were 
hatted by gunfire. They were 
released yesterday . 

The men dishevelled and 
covered with mosquito ani 
flea bites, returned to Phnom 
Penh from Kompong Thom 
province in central Cambodia 
visibly tired but in good 
health after their ordeaL 
UN officials said that the 
three Britons, two Fffipinas 
and a New Zealander were 
freed after Khmer Rouge 
leaden authorised their re- 
lease. However, Mak Ben. a 
Khmer Rouge official, said 
fiie detention was justified 
because the troops were 
ing for the Phnom r 
government. He indit 
that any other pe 
caught trespassing in 
Rouge territory would 
detached. 


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Isolated Indians 
welcome tourists 


From Christopher Thomas 

IN ITANAGAR. ARUNACHAL PRADESH 


M ost of the 26 tribes in 
the mountaiuous 
northeastern tip of India have 
never seen an outsider. The 
British sealed off the region in 
1873, saving it from cultural 
destruction by Christian mis- 
sionaries. Hie In dian govern- 
ment continued the isolation 
policy after independence in 
1947, presaving it as (me of 
the most unexplored and un- 
known comers of die world. 

Last week fiie bastion fcH 
The Delhi government an- 
nounced that tourists would 
be allowed to make controlled 
expeditions to two small dis- 
tricts, providing funds to 
modernise toe last undevel- 
oped part of India. The load 

Mhmnid nitii>n ri omtiMM hy 

the comparatively well-edu- 
cated Adi group of tribes, 
welcomed the move. 

The region was known as 
the North-East Frontier Agen- 
cy until it was renamed Arun- 
achal Pradesh in 1972. Since 
the IndoChinese war 30 
years ago the ban on outsid- 
ers, including Indians, has 
been afl but absolute. There is 
not even an airport little is 
known about fiie region’s 
ancient history because schol- 
ars and archaeologists have 
not been allowed free rein to 
explore. 

The Indian government is 
divided about opening up 
Aronachal. The environment 
department is nervous that 


CHINA 

(1BET) 


BHUTAN 


PRADESH 


BURMA 


SOW Aim 


ASSAM 

INDIA 


that tribes will be turned 
into selfeonsrioas tourist 
gimmicks. The tourism de- 
partment argues that a limit- 
ed but profitable tourist 
industry will create a vested 
interest in preserving the 
environment. 

Madhav Rao Scindia, the 
minister for tourism, flew in 
by helicopter to announce the 
selective opening of Aruna- 
tihaL Adi leaders let out a 
cheer as be did so. There are 
plans to set up helipads so 
that tourists can be ferried 
from airports in neighbouring 
Assam. Adi leaders say they 
will follow the example of the 
kingdom of Bhutan and make 
tourism expensive and selec- 
tive to minimis e cultural «nH 
environmental damage. 

Arunacfaal’s 52,000 square 
miles are home to barely 
800,000 people, predomi- 
nantly of IndoMongotoid 
stock. Most are aninris ts but 
there are some Buddhists. 
The tribes and sub-tribes 


speak at least 60 dtstmctivl 
dialects, preventing inter-tribj 
al communication. They are 

also kept apart by m ountains} 
forests and rivers. Only in the 
foothills bordering Assam ran 
tribes mmwnmieate with ane 
another in a lmgi« fiana of 
Assamese-cum-HindL 
Some tribes have teen 
changed almost avenfigh by 
the arrival of tdeviaon. 
Aerials poke from the toy of 
bamboo huts in villages ad- 
joining a few twisting main- 
tain tracks that provide 
tenuous commnnicati<ns 
with the outside world. Yotng 
men influenced by tetevison 
wear T-shirts and jeans wtile 
their fathers still dress in load 
doth and animal skins. Bun- 
boo huts serve as cinema: in 
villages with electricity, fifing 
the mountains with the somd 
of Hindi songs. But nost 
tribes live fair from sidi 
encroachments. 

T he outside world of cor- 
ruption and politiai gtny- 
mandering touches Xtamgar. 
the hilly capital, with its 
population o£2 5,000. The 
Congress (I) party has engi- 
neered itsetf into a position of 
absolute rule in the 60seat 
local assembly, and thertare 
suspicions that local .politi- 
cians are engaged mjflfcga.' 
logging. 

There is no 
taxation and 
income. U is the __ 

India without fandlc 

eylendcrs or lie, 

and there is no caste. Nt 
is there begging nor 
When people from An 
visit other areas of India] 

are often mistaken as 

ers. “They think we are 
nese and ask to see our 
says Nani Kojin, a join.— 
in l tana gar. He thinks 
arrival of tourists wiD jb< 
generally welcomed. “We cm 
not remain museum pier: 
forever.” 


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v ; 


§ | the tim es Saturday December 5 1992 

- — 

n ''"'(i: Bush sends troops 

into Somalia to 


OVERSEAS NEWS 9 




1 Indians 

e tourism 


I t .1 • _ . . 

* **• ’ i 


Shop 





protect food airlift 


By Martin Fletcher in Washington and Our Foreign Staff 

zsiaiSZ <mmn ftsxs 


awiukiuain marines on 
board helicopters are expected 
kj sweep into Mogadishu 
within days and secure the 
airport. They wOl protect a 
United Nations military airlift 
of food to starving Somalia, 
Pentagon officials announced 
last night. 

President Bush briefed con- 
gressional leaders yesterday 
and last night addressed the 
nation to explain why he was 
sending thousands of Ameri- 
can troops abroad in one of 
the largest armed humanitar- 
ian relief missions ever 
undertaken. 

Defence officials said 

28.000 American marines 
and soldiers could be deployed 
to relieve the drought-affected 
and wartom East African 
country after the UN Security 
Council unanimously voted 
on Thursday to authorise mili- 
tary intervention. 

Ail amphibious task force of 
1 ,800 marines is anchored off 
the capital Mogadishu, and 
could enter the city early next 
week or even this weekend. 
The aircraft carrier Ranger 
and two warships were also 
apparently being diverted 
from the Gulf to Somalia to 
lend support 

In Bonn, President Mitter- 
rand said that France would 
send between 1,500 and 

2.000 troops to Somalia to 
help in protecting aid. “The 
goal is to stay until we reach a 
breakthrough in this tragic 
situation." he said. Italy. Bel- 
gium, Canada. Egypt Moroc- 
co, and possibly Nigeria are 
also expected to contribute 
small troop contingents to give 
the American-led operation an 
international appearance and 
counter Third Worid fears of 
American colonialism. Japan 
said it would contribute 
money. 

In London, Baroness 
Chalker of Wallasey, overseas 
development minister, an- 
nounced that Britain is to give 
an-extra £4.5 million, to help 
die relief effort in Somalia. 
The government also an- 
nounced the deployment of 
RAF military transport air- 
craft to Somalia. 

In Mogadishu, a senior 
French official said that 
armed gangs and militias had 
begun to leave the Somali 
capital, faced with the certain- 
ty of military intervention. 
Bernard Kouchner. minister 
for humanitarian action, said 
that the “atmosphere has 


DJIBOUTI 


ETHIOPIA f ^ l &'- lf , 

e>° Jwmupii 

J BaMoa /*' OC£ANll 

< ***** - SmMw Wv 

S&xmm 

changed" since the UN vote. 
Pakistani peacekeeping sol- 
diers shot dead a Somali 
gunman and wounded two 
others in a battle at Mogadi- 
shu airport yesterday. Witness- 
es said fighting erupted when 
a “technical”, the heavily 
armed battle wagons used by 
the Somali militias, swung 
into the airport and opened 
fire on Pakistani UN soldiers. 

The Pentagon said Ameri- 
can troops would not go in 
with “guns Mazing” masting 
their purpose was simply to 
create a secure environment 
for humanitarian relief opera- 
tions. However, tbe fames 
w milrt if aWarlfpri BS1 

Clinton, tiie presidentelect, 
hailed the UN vote as an 
“historic and welcome step” 
that provided new hope to 
millions of Somalis. He 
praised Mr Bush for “taking 
the lead in this important 
hu manit arian effort”. 

Congressional Democrats 
have expressed more cautious 
support for the operation, but 
before the president’s briefing 
they were alarmed at the lade 
of a dearly defined mission or 
timetable for withdrawal, and 
at the potential cost Pentagon 
officials do not share the 
White House belief that the 
troops could complete their 
task and pull out before Mr 
Clinton’s inauguration on • 
January 20. They believe it 
could take months. 

According to Carl Mundy. 
the Marine Corps comman- 
dant. the 1,800 marines will 
first make an amphibious and 
helicopter landing in Mogadi- 
shu and pave the way for the 
arrival of their colleagues. The 
initial task vdll be primarily a 
huge engineering project 
Mogadishu airport is one of 
two in Somalia capable of 



Patten reforms win 
Nixon’s backing 

From Martin Fletcher in Washington 
and Catherine Sampson in Peking 

RICHARD Nixon, the former 
American president has ex- 
pressed strong backing for 
Chris Patten’s proposals to 
expand democracy in Hong 
Kong, and American support 
for the governor's stand app- 
ears to be growing. 

Neither President Bush nor 
Bill Clinton, the president- 
elect, have commented public- 
ly on Mr Patten’s proposals, 
but the State Department has 
issued a supportive statement. 

Media comment, particularly 
in The Wall Street Journal. 
has been favourable. Mr Pat- 

after ' m? CtintorrtT inaugura- Nixoi hi^aiSo^ 6 

tion and hopes the new presi* wffl huff and poff 

^u^amSg^uMsend prajea. of some forwani 

taSEVK?*— can- 

Chinese leaiwsnil> support of Mr Patten. 

SSL°gSS *££££ 

S lj0,n *? e SSIm Sretaiv “huff and puff” at Mr Patten’s 
Kong while foreign .j but ultimately would be 

5* c™* *SSL SSui Mr ations: Hong Kong was ther 

^gethctrnw^abottMJ to & West ^ they 

Patten s proposals needed to prove to Taiwan 

“fSSt ' visiting Peking that they meant to keep their 
at*e hSTSf S righl promise of “one country, wo 
ddegatiom^esmb^Chmas added: “If they 

reject democracy in Hong 
nor-s propomfc® oWOTip^t *ey wfll dose out any 

tied denunaatton^ chaiSe of making that impres- 

Swim tire Taiwanese.” 

ran ^. n ° n ’ -J^SiBniseflial The State Department has 
f 3 * 9“ fc called Mr Patten’s proposal a 

Mr Patten ! BJJJjjJJJ “constructive approach to die 
doing a veiy P°. |p n p go^ of the democratisation of 

Hong Kong". A Wall Street 
w Soint Dec- Journal editonal on Wednes- 

compatiblewi day lavished praise on Mr 

^ Men. saying he had "flushed 
China into the open”. 


receiving American transport 
planes, but the runway is in 
disrepair and there is no space 
for parking a large number of 
military aircraft. The port may 
be too shallow for military 
cargo vessels. 

While tiie troops win be 
flown in. most of the supplies 
for the operation win be deliv- 
ered by four pro-positioned 
Marine ships based at Diego 
Garda, the British island terri- 
tory in the southern Indian 
Ocean. They cany water puri- 
fication plants, fuel bulldoz- 
ers, armoured vehicles and 
other heavy equipment Only 
when Mogadishu had been 
secured and staging areas 
established would die troops 
begin securing roads into foe 
country for the distribution of 
relief supplies. 



Agony of Africa: a teen 
supplies, awaiting 




je Somali boy, tamed away from relief centres for days because they have only limited 
ae arrival of American troops in Mogadishu to protect international aid convoys 



Lee resigns 
as party 
leader 

Singapore: Lee Kuan Yew. the 
former prime minister, 69, 
resigned as leader of the 
People’s Action party that he 
helped to launch 3 8 years ago. 
He suggested that Goh Chok 
Tong, the present prime min- 
ister, should take over. (AP) 

Treaty signed 

Bangkok Burma has signed 
the Nuclear Non-Prolnera- 
tion Treaty, Radio Rangoon 
said. The radio said a repre- 
sentative of Rangoon's mili- 
tary junta had signed the 
treaty in Washington. (AFP) 

Rice appeal 

Hanoi Vietnam is collecting 
donations so that it can ship 
rice to Cuba. Civil servants 
have been asked to donate a 
day’s salary towards the 
10,000-tonne cargo. (Reuter) 

Bush estate 

Stuart. Florida: President's 
Bush mother, Dorothy, left 
much of her multi-mfllion- 
dollar estate to her five child- 
ren and 16 grandchildren. 
She also left $2,000 to her 
fbnner cook. 0419 


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difference between them. 


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10 EUROPEAN NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


Britain wants EC 
to abandon more 
than 30 directives 


■ Britain has put subsidiarity firmly on the Edinburgh agenda. 
The Danish opposition does not think the proposals go far enough 


From Tom Walker in Brussels 


THE British presidency of the 
European Community will 
present next week’s Edin- 
burgh summit with a hitiist of 
proposed and existing EC 
laws that it believes should be 
scrapped- 

The list, leaked by a Labour 
MEP. is the dearest a tt ac k yet 
on the powers of Brussels, and 
win inevitably be condemned 
by Jacques Delors. the presi- 
dent of the European Com- 
mission. who will put forward 
an alternative, smaller-scale 
list of questionable EC laws. 
The British presidency calls 
for mom than 30 proposed EC 
laws to be scrapped. It also 
believes existing legislation, 
such as the bathing waters 


directive, should be deleted 
from the statute bodes. By 
naming EC laws it doesn’t 
want, the presidency has 
thrown light on the obscure 
subject of “subsidiarity" — and 
has added fuel to what prom- 
ises to be a fiery summit. 

Many of the directives tar- 
geted by Britain are the work 
of Brussels’ two most contro- 
versial commissioners of re- 
cent years. Carlo Ripa di 
Meana, formerly in charge of 
environmental affairs, and 
Vasso Papandreou, social af- 
fairs commissioner, who will 
leave Brussels at the end of the 
year. Directives that may be 
deleted indude plans for a 48- 
hour workmgweek and com- 


Swiss vote poised 
on the knife edge 


By George Brock 


SWITZERLAND is a country 
where nearly half the popula- 
tion brush their teeth three 
times a day, stand-up comics 
wear cardigans and Tamil 
asyhun-sedcers seD advent 
candles unmolested by the 
lakeside in Lucerne. 

Today and tomorrow, the 
people of Switzerland vote on 
whether to join the single 
market due to be formed tty 
merging the trading areas of 
die European Community 
and the Scandinavian and 
alpine states of the European 
Free Trade Association. Eu- 
rope's “other" treaty has been 
overshadowed by the wrangles 
over Maastricht at the West- 
ern end of the continent but 
the Swiss referendum is a test 
of whether the country turns 
inwards, outwards — or even 
splits up. Polls suggest that the 
result is very finely balanced. 

For Hanspeter Kraeslin. sit- 
ting in- the warmth of a public 
house in the mountain village 
of Stans, Europe is a long way 
from Switzerland and he does 


regulations. You need simple 
load rules to take decisions." 

For advice and support Mr 
Kraeslin has brought along 
Dr Willy Futterknecht, the 
local Euro-expert Against die 
argument that Switzerland 
must join the treaty to protect 
hs export markets. Dr 
Futterknecht has a trump 
card. He brandishes an open 
letter from die head of the tittle 
factory near fay which makes 
the world famous red Swiss 


Army penknives. Ninety per 
cent of d 


not want it coming any doser. 
fai 


Mr Kraeslin. a farmer, is a 
councillor and man of some 
influence in the tiny German- 
speaking canton of Nidwald 
and he will be voting “No”. 
He acknowledges that the 
giant trading area win be 
assembled with or without the 
Swiss, but he is suspicious that 
devious outsiders are dying to 
steal Switzerland's souL “But 
we will surmount the difficul- 
ties.” Mr Kraeslin says, "in 
this treaty there are too many 


the firm’s work goes 
abroad but the knife-grinders 
are solidly hostile to any 
entanglement with "Euro- 
Babylon”. Dr Futterknecht 
says: “We don’t need anything 
from Brussels." Sitting in the 
cosmopolitan chic of die Fed- 
eral cate across the square 
from the parliament in Berne. 
Josi Bessard struggles jriam 
fully against this' truculent 
insularity. His government dfc- ., 
partment issues- fioppy dises, ' 
balloons, buttons ana books . 
which explain dial Switzer- 
land is notbeingasked to join 
the EC and dial the country 
cannot join the new market 
without sacrificing some of its 
laws to the new “Eurolex" 
system created fay the EC 
Twelve. 

The Swiss have hibernated 
away from international poli- 
tics for centuries.“We resisted 
Hitler during the last war.” 
the treaty’s leading opponent 
Christoph Blocher. told a tele- 
vision d ebat e, "and we can 
hold back foreigners again". 


mon blood alcohol limits for 
drink-driving charges. Plans 
for workers* councils, and the 
harmonisation of speed limits 
are also listed 

Ken Collins, the Labour 
MEP for Strafodyde East 
who leaked the British paper, 
said yesterday: “It’s quite dis- 
graceful; the British presiden- 
cy’s trying to tear the heart out 
of Europe.” Both the EC laws 
that have landed Britain in the 
dock of the EC Court of Justice 
recently — on the quality of 
bathing waters and drinking 
waters — are on a separate list 
of existing laws to be can- 
celled. Mr Collins said. 

A British spokesman said: 
“We happen to think our own 
legislation on these things is 
rather good and we’d like to 
change as little as possible." 

In an attempt to make the 
Maastricht treaty acceptable 
to Danish voters, the British 
presidency looks set to call for 
a confirmation by the summit 
of Denmark’s request for opt- 
outs from a common currency 
and defence policy. EC citizen- 
ship and EC legal coopera- 
tion. EC legal experts have 
questioned whether such a 
confirmation, which would 
have less weight than the 
treaty itself, would stand up in 
a court of law. But yesterday in 
Copenhagen. Uffe Eflemann- 
Jensen. Denmark’s foreign 
minister, said there were now 
“good possibilities to reach a 
final solution” at Edinburgh. 
He said there was a g reeme n t 
between all Danish parties on 
the legality of the British 


odalist People's Party said 
the British proposal did not go 
far enough. 

In Paris, there was farther 
evidence that France, at some 
stage, would reject the US-EC 
deal ova - farm subsidies. Do- 
minique Strauss-Kahn. the in- 
dustry and trade minister, 
sai(kt/!Xbe whole agreement 
doeJndrtebect tbe fairness we 
wantedLWe also want the US 
to : reduce; subsidies to its 
farinfasL*"’ 

□ Washington: The Bush ad- 
ministration yesterday re- 
voked the punitive 200 per 
cent tariffs on $300 million 
(£189 million) of European 
farm products that were due to 
take effect today. Carla Hills, 
the American trade represen- 
tative, said that now dial the 
agreement on EC farm subsi- 
dies had been confirmed in 
writing, the tariffs were 
unnecessary. 


Bumper harvest, page 7 
Letters, page 13 



Conversational Fresfcb: the Prince of Wales accepting his associate membership 

VToral Sciences in Paris, while die 


of the French Academy of Political and Mor 
group’s president, top right, chats to the secretary 


Royal support page 1 


Parisian 
passion 
brings in 
the law 


Fhosi Charles Bremnrr 
imparts 


THE world's most famous 
embrace most surety be “Le 
baiser de lUOtel de Vfile". 
Thanks to Robert Doisneau, 
die photographer-poet of the 

streets, those unsuspecting 
young lovers of postwar Paris 
have become the icon of a 
bygone age. 

Almost everyone knows M 
Doisneau’s account of that 
lucky moment in the spring of 
1950 when he snapped the 
picture that launched a mil- 
lion posters. 

WeD, not quite. M 
Doisneau now says it was all a 
set-up with actors. The matter 
is about to be tested in a Paris 
court which will bear a daim 
for heavy damages from Jean- 
Lotris and Denise Lavergne, a 
couide in their sixties, who are 
certain it was their moment of 
youthful passion that M Dois- 
neau seized far posterity. 

“We were young fianefe at 
the time.” M Lavergne says- “l 
was wearing my only tailor- 
made siriL Denise was dressed 
in a jacket and skirt that she 
had had made and tiie had a 
chain bracelet, a gift from her 
father, on her wrist" ITie pair, 
he says, had just left the BHV 
department store opposite the 
town hall on the rue de RivolL 

The couple, who run a 
printing business in the east- 
ern suburbs, were thrilled 
when they discovered their 
image in 1988. when it fea- 
tured on tbe cover of die 
French TV guide five years 
after the photograph was giv- 
en mass circulation as a poster 
and postcard. M Doisneau, 
who is now 80 and has lost 
none of his playfulness, 
lunched with them and said 
nothing to contradict them, 
according to the lawyers of 
both sides. At this point, die 

riig pH te hpgin3- 

M Lavergne, who is 66, said 
last night that he and his wife 
had been mortified to team, 
after th^ appeared on trie- 
vision in February, that M 
Doisneau was claiming that 
he had staged their portrait 
using not them but profession- 
al models. 





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PICTURED on.tbe j. 
screens of Europe's , 
dia in tbe rarnipj 
European* 

burgh summit, Bril 

btes once again a small and 
semi-detached state that has 
lost its sense of purpose. 

T have the feeling of living 
in a bad dream,” Jean 
Durieux of La Libre Belgique 
complained yesterday. Few 
continental commentators on 
European politics would agree 
that Britain ever shared its EC 
partners' desire for unifica- 
tion, and previews of Edin- 
burgh regularly hint that 
Britain is enjoying the Com- 
munity's introspective 
discomfort 

This week’s French-lan- 
guage newspapers lament yet 
another alleged example of 
Britain abusing the privileges 
of the EC presidency to pack 
the agenda for an employ- 
ment ministers* meeting with 



A weekly look at how the world views Britain 


empty declarations inspired try 
the government’s “Thafcherite 
credo". Liberation was honest 
enough to record in its cata- 
logue of British perfidy that 
the key directive limiting Eu- 
rope’s working week is 
blocked by a dispute between 
France and Germany. ' 


The soap opera of Norman 
Lamonfs difficult 


acuity with his 
Access card quickly disap- 
peared, to be replaced by 
worthier but less interesting 
accounts of the summit be- 
tween Helmut Kohl, the Ger- 
man chancellor, and Francois 
Mitterrand and confirmation 
that the German parliament 
had ratified the Maastricht 
treaty. The twists and turns of 
British cabinet politics this 
autumn have reduced Euro- 
pean correspondents to the 


pitying giggles people would 
be reduced to watching a 
group of men stumbling 
round a darkened room look- 
ing for their pyjamas. 

Few writers could credit foe 
idea that darker forces were at 
work in a minister's off-licence 
purchases. Britons and then- 
newspapers cannot forgive foe 
Chancellor of foe Exchequer, 
one wrote, for the "national 
humiliation” of the pound’s 
exit from tbe European ex- 
change-rate mechanism. 


Forecasts for the Edinburgh 
beat John 


summit are downbeat 
Major is heading for a “for- 
eign policy fiasco" in the 
Scottish capital according to 
foe Frankfurter Allgemeine 
Zeitung. “Desacordo Total" 
fTotal Discord) reported Pu- 
blico of Lisbon after Mr 


Major had gone over foe 
familiar budget rows with his 
Portuguese counterpart 

Looking for small crumbs of 
comfort, foe Dutch daily NR C 
Handelsblad pointed out foal 
the summit mil be held in a 
part of the United Kingdom 
which is much more sympa- 
thetic to Europe than Eng- 
land. The New York Times 
devoted a long front page 
analysis by Craig Whitney, its 
London bureau chief, to Eu- 
rope's crisis of confidence 
which quoted an unidentified 
diplomat on “a crucial col- 
lapse of political credibility in 
Western Europe”. 

European reporters are fas- 
cinated by the mechanical 
similes used by Douglas Hurd 
to describe the intricate EC 
negotiations. Last year he 
compared the final phase of 
the Maastricht treaty talks to 
12-dimensional chess. This 
year one of his officials 
thought that foe budget prob- 
lem resembled the problems 
posed by Rubik's cube. 


Oil kills 
Spanish 
wildlife 


Geneva: An oil spill caused by 
a Greek tanker that ran 
aground and caught fire off 
the coast of northern Spain is 
threatening birds, fish and 
dolphins in the area, the 
World Wide Fund for Nature 
(WWFJsaid. 

The 80.000 tonnes of Brit- 


ish o3 spilled by the stricken 
tanker, foe Aei 


Aegean Sea. which 

ran aground in a heavy storm 
and broke up off La Coruna 
on Thursday, is ravaging 
coastal ecosystems, foe WWF 
said. “The first visible victims 
are tens of thousands of mi- 
gratory birds," it said. 

Ezequiel Navfo, marine co- 
ordinator for WWF Spain, 
said: “Dangerous and catas- 
trophic accidents like that of 
the Aegean Sea merely prove 
that existing transit regula- 
tions for marine toxic goods 
are inadequate. 


Shamir tumour 


Td Aviv: Doctors have re- 
moved a malignant tumour 
from the colon of Yitzhak 
Shamir, 77, the former Israeli 
prime minister, after a two- 
hour operation. They said his 
chances for a fall recovery 
were good and that he nuty go 
home soon. (AFP) 


Corsica protest 

Ajaccio; Nationalists set off 27 
bombs on Corsica and in 
mainland France yesterday in 
a campaign to preserve a spe- 
cial tax status for the French 
Mediterranean island. The 
devices caused serious damage 
to tax offices but no casual- 
ties. (Reuter) 


Captain jailed 


Athens: The Italian captain of 
a freighter that was in collision 
with a Greek liner, the Jupiter, 
carrying 500 British children, 
in 1 988. has been jailed for six 
years fay a Greek court. A Brit- 
ish teacher. one pupil and two 
crew, were killed. (Reuter) 


Unita warned 


Luanda: President dos Santos 
of Angola told Unita rebels 
that foe government's “good 
faith and willingness to hold 
dialogue is dangerously reach- 
ing its limit” in a speech foal 
diplomats called a virtual dec- 
laration of war. fReuterf \ 


SunnieMann 


Nicosia: John Major paid 
tribute to Sunnie Mann’s 
“courage and fighting spirit” 
in a message read at her funer- 
al in Cyprus. A wreath from 
her husband. Jade Mann, tire 
former boscage, read: “Sunnie 
darling, part of the cost of love 
is sorrow." 


Tajiks fight on 


Tashkent: A ceasefire among 
Tajikistan’s waning groups 
collapsed as dashes continued 
in the capital Dushanbe. Pro- 
communist forces were poised 
to secure foe city. Battles were 
also being fought in outlying 
regions. 


Verdict given 


New York: Dewi Sukarno, 
widow of President Sukarno 
of Indonesia, was given a sus- 
pended sentence after admit- 
ting to an attack on a feDow 
socialite with a champagne 
glass during a party in Aspen. 
Colorado. 


Mussolini granddaughter seeks 
cash to buy II Duce’s home 


From John Phillips 

IN ROME 


ALESSANDRA Mussolini 
foe neofascist Italian MP. 
yesterday appealed for finan- 
cial help to enable her to take 
out a mortgage to buy the 
house where her grandfather, 
IlDuce, was bom more than a 
century ago. 

“Barbarians, 


take 


your 

hands off the house of my 
La 


nonno (grandfather), 
Stampa newspaper quoted 
her as saying. Tbe modest 
three-storey country house in 
the village of Predap pio, 25 
miles southwest of Ravenna, 
is one of a package of proper- 
ties the state is selling to raise 
money to reduce the huge 
budget deficit Officials said 
foe building would be auc- 
tioned with a reserve price of 
56 million tire (£26,000). 

But Signora Mussolini 29, 
has laid daim to the property 
as a birthright "I am maid 
foe house MU end up in the 
wrong hands and, who knows, 
become a restaurant” 

Signora Mussolini has 
made a personal appeal to 
Giovanni Goria, foe finance 
minister, to help her save the 
bouse. Signor Goria. a Chris- 
tian Democrat, succumbed to 
her charms so far as to offer 
his opposition colleague a 
mortgage, recommending 



Desirable residence: where Mussolini was bom 


that she write to his minis try, 
Ui Stampa reported. 

“My only income is my 
MP*s salary,” said the deputy 
for the Italian Social Move- 
ment who was elected to the 
Chamber of Deputies in tire 
April general election. “If it 
goes to auction, that wfll be 
the end. Certainly I cannot 
compete with a millionaire. 

Even if die masters suffi- 
cient funds. Signora Mussoli- 
ni may be thwarted fay fro 
Maitelti, foe mayor of 
Predappio, a member of foe 
former Communist Demo- 
cratic Party of foe Left. Signor 
MaroeOi wants the town hall 
to buy the house to prevent it 
being turned into a propagan- 
da museum by the neo-fas- 
cists. “It is one of the oldest 


houses of Predappio,” foe 
mayor said- There is a 
ground floor where Mussoli- 
m’s father Alessandro worked 
as a blacksmith. There are 
t hr e e reception rooms on foe 
first flow and three small 
bedrooms fa the a*tic reached 
by dnrih ing a wooden ladder. 
It is a peaceful property baih 
about 150 years ago in foe 
typical peasent style of foe 
Romagnotoarea.” 

He added: "We believe it 
has historical value because a 
bead-of-state was bom there. 
But it should be preserved as 
a historic record run by the 
council not exalted.” 

Aides to foe superintendant 
for heritage in Ravenna said 
they have spent £119.000 
maintaining the building. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 



EUROPEAN NEWS 1 1 


Macedonia issue threatens to dominate EC summit 


EC members could sour 
relations with Greece if they 
give in to pressure to 
recognise Macedonia, 

Af ichael Binyon writes 




RECOGNITION of Mac- 
edonia is one of the most 
divisive issues on the agenda 
of the Edinburgh summit, 
one that is likely to generate 
long argument and lead to 
diplomatic deadlock. 

Despite a friendly Down- 
ing Street meeting on Thurs- 
day. evening between John 
Major and President Gtigo- 
rov of Macedonia. Britain 
sees little hope of compromise 
in the bitter feud between 
ureeec and its northern 
neighbour. 

Robin O’Neill, the diplo- 
mat asked by the British 
presidency to mediate be- 
tween Athens and Skopje, has 
made little headway. Neither 
side is ready to compromise 
over the use of the word 
Macdeonia in the former 
Yugoslav republic’s name. 

In June the European 
Community summit in Lis- 
bon decided to withhold rec- 
ognition but there is 
mounting pressure for that to 
be reversed. Led by the Dutch, 
several EC members, includ- 


ing Britain and Germany, 
argue that non-recognition is 
illogical and dangerous. They 
say that Macedonia has ftil- 
fjkd all the conditions set by 
the EC for recognition of 
other former Yugoslav repub- 
lics. Leaving Skopje in limbo 
has deprived it of vital EC aid, 
is increasing fissiparous na- 
tionalist pressures on Mr 
Gligorov and could lead to 
ethnic tensions that might 
erupt in a conflict that would 
draw in all Macedonia’s 
neighbours. 

Greece, however, insists 
that the issue is of vital 
national importance and is 
appealing for EC solidarity. 
Greek public opinion is in- 
flamed at what it sees as an 


attempt to steal Greek history 
and culture and at implicit 
territorial claims on northern 
Greece. Constantine Mitso- 
takis, the prime minister, has 
said his centre-right govern- 
ment would collapse if there 
were any change in EC policy. 

The point was forcefully 
made to Mr Major during his 
recent Athens visit and will 
again be underlined by 
Michalis Papaconstantinou. 
the foreign minister, to his EC 
colleagues in Brussels on 
Monday. Greece is threaten- 
ing unilateral measures if 
Macedonia is recognised, in- 
cluding dosing its northern 
border, a total trade boycott 
and non-cooperation with the 
EC in other fields. 


Britain sees great dangers 
whatever the outcome at Ed- 
inburgh. If recognition is 
withheld, it fears Mr 
Gligororis authority over his 
shaky coalition, which in- 
dudes members of the Alba- 
nian minority, will drain 
away. Tension between ethnic 
groups is likely to increase, as 
well as growing strain with 
Albania and a possible revival 
of Bulgarian territorial claims 

on an area that has been twice 
fought over in Balkan wars. 

Special EC help to counter- 
act the devastating impact of 
sanctions on Serbia is already 
dependent on Greek good- 
will.- continuing denial of EC 
aid could drive Skopje into 
the arms of Serbia. 

If the EC ignores Greek 
pleas and overturns the Lis- 
bon declaration, Macedonia 
will effectively be cut off. It 
depends on the port of Thes- 
saloniki and the rail link 
north for almost all imports 
and exports. The links 
through Serbia are blocked; 
the read to Albania is impass- 


able; the only exit route is the 
poor road east to Bulgaria. 
Despite Greek claims that 
they have sent 40,000 tonnes 
of oil north this year, Macedo- 
nians say they are already 
suffering a devastating eco- 
nomic blockade by Greece. 

Mr Gligorov and Denko 
Maleski, ms foreign minister. 


found a sympathetic welcome 
in Britain. Greece, however, 
has sent Virginia Tsouderou, 
a senior diplomat, to warn the 
British presidency that Greece 
would be the first country to 
suffer if the Balkan war 
spreads south; that, as in 
Bosnia, premature recogni- 
tion would not guarantee 


Macedonia’s security and 
that Greece expects the same 
EC solidarity as Denmark 
does over Maastricht. She 
points out that Greece has 
obtained a guarantee from all 
the republic's neighbours that 
its borders are inviolable. 

Greece accuses Mr Gligo- 
rov of mounting a propagan- 
da campaign at the expense of 
economic development, of 
continuing the policies of 
Stalin and Tito in creating an 
artificial nationality, of rous- 
ing the proposed compromise 
of a double name, and of 
using the name and star 
emhlem of Philip Ji as a cover 
for territorial expansionism. 

Such intemperate language 
makes compromise unlikely. 
Britain has suggested that 
Macedonia change its name 
unilaterally to “Northern 
Macedonia” or “The Slavic 
Republic of Macedonia" as a 
gesture of goodwill, which, 
though not satisfying Athens, 
might assuage Greek fears. 
Mr Gligorov rules this out it 
would be seen in Skopje as an 


unacceptable concession to 
outside pressure. Macedonia 
accuses Greece of flying ® 
strangle the new republic, of 
hastening a Balkan war and 
of conniving with Serbia. 

The likely outcome at Edin- 
burgh is deadlock, with the 
argument eating into time the 
EC wants to spend on policy 
over Bosnia. President Mit- 
terrand is personally commit- 
ted to support for Greece; 
other countries may insist on 
breaking flee of the Lisbon 
declaration. 

The wrangling on this issue 
could do lasting damage to 
Greek relations with the EC, 
and would certainty make a 
common foreign policy more 
difficult to achieve in other 
areas. Macedonia would then 
take its case to the United 
Nations, as Americaand sev- 
eral other countries are wait- 
ing for an EC lead before 
taking a derision on 
recognition. 


Reagan speech, page 3 
Leading article, page 13 


Yeltsin supporters 
call for referendum 
to beat Congress 

■ President Yeltsin is being driven by hardliners to dissolve the 
full parliament His moderate critics are eyeing cabinet posts 


From Anne McElvov in Moscow 


PRESIDENT Yeltsin battled 
yesterday to save his reforms 
after the conservative Con- 
gress of People's Deputies 
condemned the record of his 
tent and demanded 
icntal policy changes. 

The resolution, passed by an 
overwhelming majority, indi- 
cates a hardening of hostility 
towards the government and 
makes it more likely that Mr 
Yeltsin will have to take emer- 
gency steps to ensure that his 
reforms continue. 

The swing against die presi- 
dent enraged Vyacheslav Kos- 
tikov, his spokesman, who 


said the Congress’s antipathy 
might mean Mr Yeltsin would 
be forced to hold a referendum 
to dissolve it That would need 
support from a third of the 
deputies or a petition with a 
million signatures but is con- 
sidered risky because it would 
polarise tire country at a time 
when die government is ask- 
ing moderate political forces to 
unite in the race of economic 
hardship and the threat of 
nationalist extremism. Asked 
if Mr Ydtsin would be pre- 
pared to bypass the constitu- 
tion jmd simply dissolve the 
'ruling body, Mr 



YEGOR Gaidar. 36. a bril- 
liant, workaholic academic 
and journalist. Russia’s 
acting prime minister and ar- 
chitect of economic re- 
form. The doggedness of his 
commitment to market 
economics has won him wide- 
spread respect in the Wert 
and some grudging admira- 
tion at home. The son of a 
famous children's writer and 
grandson of a distin- 
guished admiral. Mr Gaidar 

used his establishment 

credentials to undermine the 
Soviet system from with- 
in; he was economics editor 
of a prestigious journal 
and later of Pravda in the fi- 
nal years of co mm u n ism. 


ARKADY Volsky, 60. a 
skilled and influential polit- 
ical operator, is a fanner 
party apparatchik who now 
presents himself as 
spokesman for bosses and 
workers at Russia's giant 
in du s tria l plants. This sum- 
mer he founded “Renew- 
al”, a group that lobbied on 
behalfof factory directors 
struggling with market re- 
forms, and then helped to 
found the Civic Union, which 
aimed to become chief _ 
power-broker in the legisla- 
ture. He says he supports 
reforms, though at a slower 
pace than Mr Gaidar ad- 
vocates. He was an adviser to 
Andropov and Chernenko. 



RUSLAN Khasbulatov. 

50, a mysterious figure m 

Russian political ure and 

the partiamentaiy dflinnan 
who emerged in 1990 as a 


adc repeateo ai- 

m fast-track reform, a 
manipulator of par- 

i taxy procedure, t be 
smoking economics 
sorbasoftenojisrf 

e. He described the 

t last spring as wonns 
cn -desphe tape- 
ed evidence -denied 

tn warrior race. 


ALEKSANDR Rutskoi, 

45, a da sh in g air force officer 
was shot down twice dur- 
ing bombing raids in Afghan- 
istan. The vice-president 

personifies one important 
faction in the Yeltsin 
camp: tiie faction that rejects 
the ideology of Marxism 
but retains the idea of Russia 
as a great power. He 
emerged last year as leader of 
a “liberal communist” 
parliamentary faction which 
delivered key votes to Mr 
Yeltsin. While broadly loyal 

to Mr Yeltsin, he has at- 
tacked the Gakfar cabinet 
and called fora tough line 
towards other former Soviet 
republics. 

. _ . x... ... — - • 


Kostikov said: “I do not ex- 
clude such a possibility.” 

Mr Ydtsin urged deputies 
to reject the proposals that 
would strip him of his powers 
to appoint a government and 
in effect allow the hanfline- 
dominated parliament to run 
the country. He said then- 
adoption would damage Rus- 
sia’s statehood and turn the 
government into “a spineless 
appendage". He added: “You 
would get weak government 
regardless of who heads iL 
The whole executive power 
'would be damaged and re- 
form would be in question.” 
The special powers by which 
he has ruled Russia since 
March ran out on Tuesday 
ahd must be granted anew by 
the Congress. 

Opponents of Mr Ydtsin 
have won some procedural 
votes with almost the two- 
thirds majority they would 
need to pass the amendments 
that would tame the radical 
government Deputies, how- 
ever. are fickle and Mr 
Ydtsin’s strategy appears to be 
to frighten deputies into back- 
ing down by threatening cha- 
os in the country unless they 
approve his’powers. The Con- 
gress will reconvene today to 
vote on the amendments. 

The government believes 
that the Supreme Soviet is 
hampering its ability to carry 
out policy. Under the sway of 
Ruslan Khasbulatov, its con- 
servative chairman, the parlia- 
ment has blocked many 
reform moves in recent 
months and Mr Khasbulatov 
declared this week that he 
disagreed with the govern- 
ment not only over the pace of 
reforms but also over their 
baric aim. 

The Ydtsin camp is disap- 
pointed that informal agree- 
ments with centre-right de- 
ments of Civic Union to stabi- 
lise the government have not 
materialised, with several 
votes showing hardliners ra- 
ther than centre-conservatives 
to be in control. “Today’s 
events have shown that the 

five from the start^Mr Kosti- 
kov said- “The more sacrifices 
the government presents, the 
more aggressive it becomes.” 
He said that other ministers 
intended to resign if the as- 
sembly did not accept the 
continuation in office of Yegor 
Gaidar, the radical ac&ng 
prime minister. 

Andrei Nechayev, the eco- 
nomics minister, called the 
mow to subject the govern- 
ment to the Congress's whim 
“a- constitutional coup” and 
said the entire cabinet would 
resign ff the legislature did not 
back Mr Yeltsin and Mr 
Gaidar. Despite the colourful 
debates that dominate pro- 
ceedings, much of the real 
bargaining is done behind the 
scenes in traditional Kremlin 
style and many of Mr Ydtsin’s 
supporters believe, that a deal 
with Civic Union on cabinet 
portfolios may well be the 
outcome of the deadlock. 

“The price for keeping Mr 
Gaidar in office may well be 
four or five posts for the 
union," sold Igor Golombow 
sky. editor-in-chief of the 
liberal Izvestia newspaper. 
“The big .soueeze is. now on 
and the options are limited,’' 
he added. . 

Ydtsin on the edge, page 12 



Close upc a Russian deputy tries to get a better view of President Yeltsin at the people's Congress to Moscow yesterday. The Congress passed 
a resolution condemning (be government’s record, thus narrowing Mr Yeltsin’s means of ensuring that his reforms continue 


Baby food to reach 
Vitez by Christmas 

By Ruth Gledhill 


THE 1st AID appeal which 
aims to raise El million for 
immediate disaster relief by 
January 1. is about to fund its 
first mission. 

The appeal is financing a 
life-saving delivery of baby 
food to the former Yugoslavia. 
The toby food will be deliv- 
ered to refugees near Vitez and 
Travnik in Bosnia before 
Christmas. 

Refugees tiring in freezing 
conditions in temporary 
homes, or in what remains of 
their houses after shelling, are 
bring forced to feed babies 
and young children on wateiy 
soup or bread dipped in tea. 
Many homes are without 
heating, light or proper shel- 
ter. Shortages of baby food 
chronic, and even more severe 
than the shortages of adult 
food. 

The supplies win be taken to 
Split, Croatia, in a20-ton lorry 
by Feed the Children, the 
lamest British agency taking 
aid directly to former Yugosla- 
via. From Split it wfll be 
transferred to four-wheel drive 
trucks to be ferried across the 
border to Vitez, Feed the 
Children’s base in Bosnia, 
then to go immediately to 
refugees in Travnik and else- 
where. The food should be 
with the mothers and babies 
by December 20. 

Stewart Crocker, fand-rais- 
ing director of Feed the Child- 
ren. said the lorry was one of 
about 20 travelling to the 
former Yugoslavia that week. 
This load will get priority 
because there is a chronic 


rtage of baby food. Babies 
not receiving any 
aalised food. Most relief 
1 is destined for adult 
sumption. This is a valn- 
an and 1st AID 
ig another source of 


THE TIMES 



IS AID 


funding for agencies doing 
this work.” Jeff Aldeiscm, 1st 
AID overseas officer, said: 
“The food is going to refugees 
who have been turned out on 
the road with nothing, who 
are camped in schools or in 

what is left of their homes.” 

Robert Kandt, 1st AID ap- 
peals director, said: “This mis- 
sion indicates how AID 
wffi wink. Feed the Children is 
taking the supplies; we are 
simply giving diem the money 
to arable them to do it" 1st 
AID is being coordinated by 
the World Memorial Fund for 
Disaster Relief, an interna- 
tional charity set up in 1989 
by the late Lord Cheshire with 
United Nations backing. 

The Charities Aid Founda- 
tion wQl be responsible for all 
aspects of banking and dona- 
tion costs of 1st AID. Dona- 
tions can be made by 
telephoning the credit card 
hotline on 0272-226688 (24 
hours); cheque/postal order 
payable to 1 st AID and sent to 
1st AID Appeal, do CAF 
Fteepost TN 2257, Tun- 
bridge Wells, KentTN2 5BR: 
or over the counter at any 
Bradford & Bingley Building 
Society or Midland Bank 
branch. 

□ Tokyo: Japan wQl give £2.5 
million in fresh aid to the 
republics of the former Yugo- 
slavia. the foreign ministry 
said last night. 


Good News for 
N&P VISA 
Cardholders. 

Interest Rate Reduction Notice to N&P VISA Customers. 

National & Provincial Building Society is to reduce 
the monthly interest rate charged on the N&P VISA card 
from 1.81% to 1.65% (APR 2L6%) with effect from 15 
January 1993. 

With effect from the same date, the rate of interest 
payable on credit balances will be the rate applicable to 
the £1 tier on our Instant Reserve account except that, in 
the event of any change in that rate, the revised rate will 
be applied 14 days after the effective date of that change. 

If you require further details, contact your local branch 
office or Card Services, Dunfermline. 

N&P_ 

No-one's busier on your behalf 

National &. Provincial Building Society, Provincial House, Bradford, BD1 1NL 
Telephone 0274 733444. Fax 0274 737918 











THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 -1 


Building society proposals to discriminate in favour of married couples are unfair, unjust and unworkable, argues Matthew Pams 

SSiSSRKSis: pin/l Uq pwHit lwnrtliv iasstt 

SJsBii aaa uidu 10 DC CicQ.ll Wurilly asssjass 


S ingle, childless people are to 
pay more for our mortgages. 
The Bristol & West build in? 


K^f The Bristol & West building 
society is considering differential 
interest rates, loaded against single 
people because we are the type of 
individual they think more likely to 
default. "Not bonded by mar- 
riage,” is the delicate phrase chosen 
by Tony Fitzsimmons, their chief 
executive, to describe our fickle and 
uncreditworthy natures. 

Ha! So it has come to this? My 
fury was aggravated by the know- 
ledge that I have no mongage with 
the Bristol & West and am therefore 
denied the pleasure of marching 
down to the nearest branch to 
withdraw it and take my custom 
elsewhere. 

So I had been alternately cursing 
and brooding (we single people, 
when not busy defaulting on debts, 
are subject to wild swings of mood) 
and kicking things. 

My rage swelled as news about 
the new council tax was an- 
nounced. My bill, it seems, may 


approach £1,000. For this I get my 
dtutbin emptied once a week by the 
Derbyshire Dales district council 
The rest of the money goes to help 
the county council educate the 
children I don't have, fund the 
serial services department’s work 
dealing with wife-beating and do- 
mestic violence among married 
couples, build the council houses 
for which they have priority on the 
waiting list, repair the bus shelters 
smashed by their kids, and care for 
them in old age when foe offspring 
upon whom they have blown ail 
their savings desert them. 

Where will it end? Shall single 
Telecom subscribers pay a sur- 
charge because we are more likely 
to default? What about the interest 
rates on our Visa cards? Should we 
be allowed to drive cars at all. our 


motoring habits being unre- 
strained by any fear of orphaning 
little dependants? Perhaps we 
should be restricted to humdrum 
employment in pests of a non- 
sensitive sort, unguided as we are 
by concern for posterity. 

Matrimony! Bah! Humbug! 
Then I read The Times leading 
article. My blood ran cold. It 
supported the Bristol & West This 
move, it argued, was “no less 
discriminatory than the policy of 
motor insurers who charge twice as 
much to a 23-year-old driving a hot 
hatchback as to a 55-year-old 
grandmother.*' 

Grandmother! Notice • that? 
There they go again. She’s a 
grandmother so she’s presumably 
incapable of jumping a red light 
Ah no, argues The Times, loading 


premiums against whole categories 
of individuals on foe baas of half- 
code actuarial generalisations is, 
they accept tough justice on the 
untypical safe 23-year-old driver, 
but he just has to accept that he is 
part of a doss of motorist who 
scores badly. 


S o ifl were to discover (say) 
that one of the ethnic groups 
making up our population 


L7 making 19 our population 
has an appreciably worse motoring 
record than another, then The 
Times would rally behind colour- 
testing for insurance premiums, 
would it? 

And I will tell you something 
else. Mr Times leaderwriten The 
only reason the 23-year-old takes 
out motor insurance at all is 
because it is compulsory. If the 


motor insurance business was a 
genuinely free market instead of a 
st ate-sponsored scam, then individ- 
uals aggrieved that the insurer was 
f ailin g to assess them as individ- 
uals, and lumping them into crude 
and inappropriate classes, would 

screw up their cover notes and stuff 
them where I would be stuffing my 
Bristol & West mortgage deeds, if 1 
had any. 

Which moves me from ray ex- 
tended harrumph to the gravamen 


have to do it to some degree. Until 
now, all mortgagees have been 
treated as an imdifgfpntia tf d 
mass, and charged foe same. The 
better risks have subsidised foe 
worst It is to rectify that that the 
Bristol & West wants to create sub* 


species among mortgagees and 
differentiate, "nicy accept that some 

injustices w2l result, but argue that 

this is foe cost of mitigating a larger 
injustice. 

And my reply? In logic they are 
right Indeed their logic can be 
taken further. It migh t prove 
applicable to racial groupings, who 
might have different cultural atti- 
tudes towards debt, it might apply 
to g e n d er differences: women are 
better debtors than men. Single 
homosexual men. furthermore, are 
better risks than rin glp 


of my complaint. Let me put foe 
building society argument as fairly 
as I can. then reply. 

The Bristol & West say that there 
is nothing inherently unjust about 
making good rids pay for bad 


risks. To lump us all together 

without regard for our own partiai- 


without regard for our own particu- 
lars is rough justice, but insures 


men, a$ foey are less likefy to saddle 

themselves with family obligations 
they cannot sustain- Further’, senior 
civil servants are probably a better 
risk than journalists and certainly 
safer than navvies in other word&a 
job-class test could help in 
classifying risk. Devout members of 
any Protestant church, I believe, 
world be among the best risks in 
Britain. 

In short, my friends ax Bristol & 
West, proceed further down the 
road on which you propose to start 
and you w31 quickly find yourself 
risking the injustice which rankles 
most in any man or woman: 
individuals deeply resent assump- 


ST A 


>•* 




tions bong made about them on 
the basis of supposed categories. In 
England, sex. class, morals and 
career status are foe categories on 
which we are at our most prickly. 
They are also categories with 
obvious potential for assumptions 
about credit worthiness. Go no 
further. B & W. You have been 
warned! 


The battle for 
Russia’s soul 

Hardliners are poised to derail 


America is taking up the white man’s burden with its misguided intervention in Somalia 


This caring imperialism 


Take up the White Man’s burden 
The savage wars of peace 


Yeltsin’s plans, says Anne McEIvoy mw£t 

— — And bid the sickness cease. 


S et-piece power struggles are 
built into the fabric of Rus- 
sian history. The old Leninist 
question of who wields the power, 
in whose name and for whose 
benefit is at the core of this week's 
events in Kremlin palace, home to 
Russia’s Congress of People’s Dep- 
uties. 

The outcome of foe assembly will 
determine whether the reforms 
begun by President Yeltsin can 
continue. The alternative is a 
triumph for the hardliners who are 
seeking a reversal of the radical 
changes and would set the country 
back on the road to centralism. 

Unlike the revolu- 

tionaries of 1917. 

Boris Yeltsin does t-Tfc rvn 
not have the option 
of ruthlessly violent _ii j_ r 

methods, followed lie 

by administrative • , 

repression, to en- lniCT 

sure that his vision 
of Russia holds DfOtt 

sway. Such is foe * 

price of democracy. +V» pryi 

Congress so far Uiciii 

has not been a sue- l 

cess for the Yeltsin IlOm J 

team. It meets at j 

the nadir of the TcLQ 

reform programme _ 

with inflation and TCIO 

unemployment ris- 
ing, and the rouble " 
plummeting. The president's oppo- 
nents believe that a return to 
centralism can keep unprofitable 
factories open and the workers 
employed while still pursuing 
reform. 

The recommendations of foe 
Chic Union, which ranks as the 
moderate alternative to the present 
strategy, although hidden behind 
foe slogan “slower-paced reform", 
would signal an end to the transi- 
tion to a market economy. It 
believes foe state should bafl out the 
bloated military-industrial enter- 
prises which Stalin created and the 
Cold War sustained. 

The forces of foe reformers and 
hinderers is finely balanced but 
many of the votes, such as yester- 
day’s resolution demanding fcnda- 
mcntal changes to the reform 
programme, indicate that a broad 
church of unreconstructed commu- 
nists. military men and pragmatic 
industrialists are in foe majority. 
All have an interest in protecting 
themselves from radical changes to 
their state-protected influence. 

In an ideal wurld foe Congress 
would not be taking place at all. A 
vestige of the Gorbachev years 
packed with former communists, it 
is a kangaroo court of conservatism 
presiding over a reformist govern- 
ment. Mr Yeltsin is quite right to 
pursue with vigour the separation 
of executive and legislative powers. 
Most worrying is the number of 


His opponents 
all have an 
interest in 
protecting 
themselves 
from further 
radical 
reforms 


doset conservatives whose commit- 
ment to change is merely extern aL 
It is no accident (as the communists 
were fond of remarking) that the 
podium scuffle broke out over 
whether the ballot on constitutional 
amendments should be secret The 
liberals fear that many who out- 
wardly support Mr Yeltsin would 
vote against him in a secret ballot 
and foe backroom pacts would 
collapse. 

In this climate there is little 
chance of the government reaching 
a painless compromise with foe 
opposition and Mr Yeltsin is hav- 
ing to consider emergency sol- 

utions. such as 

whether to bypass 
mrtpntc Congress altogefo- 

JUircuiA grand instigate dfr- 

\to 01-1 ect presidential 

VC dll rule. This would be 

. • a risky strategy 

-SI 111 once it would invite 

, civil unrest and, 

Cting being both uncon- 

0 stitutional and au- j 

ZpIvpq tocratic, would be 

hard to explain to 

nrthpr foe West 

LU UlCi Xh e alternative 

iral being mooted by 

ILctl his advisors 15 a 

' deal with Civic 
miS Union, giving 

_ them a handful of 
cabinet posts in re- 
turn for voting with the govern- 
ment. Although buying foe presi- 
dent time this risks bringing 
opponents of reform dose to foe 
heart of government from where 
they could strike for power. 

The Civic Union’s vision of 
Russia should worry the West not 
just because its nostrums will 
further weaken the economy, deep- 
ening the dangers of instability and 
the lure of nationalism, but because 
its affiliations with the military will 
encourage foe retention of a huge 
army, increased arms production 
and exports and a greater role for 
foe generals in foe running of the 
state. It is not concerned with 
integration, harbouring isolationist 
visions of a Great Russia behind 
foe bland slogan of “self-reliance’'. 
Many Civic Union activists consid- 
er foe dissolution of the Soviet 
Union a mistake and are much 
readier than Mr Yeltsin to risk 
intervening in other republics. 

Nor is foe apposition committed 
to democracy — its guru Arkadi 
Volsky talks of a “Chinese way" for 
Russia, citing Bejing’s economic 
successes without mentioning foe 
political conditions which accom- 
pany them. 

The Russian flag hangs half- 
un furled above foe assembly plat- 
form. reflecting the country’s 
uneasy poise between reform and 
regression; no one yet dares guess 
who will capture it 


T his is the way a war starts, 
not with a bang but a 
slither. The British gov- 
ernment is being sucked 
into three distant conflicts at foe 
behest of American (and some 
British) public opinion. It must' 
resist 

Not content with trying to de- 
mocratise Cambodia and partition 
Iraq, a transitional American gov- 
ernment appears to be steeling 
itself to go to war with what passes 
for Somalia and Serbia. As is now 
customary, these wars are sur- 
rounded with euphemism. They 
are under a “multilateral UN 
umbrella”. They are to keep foe 
peace, monitor democracy, protect 
aid. Soldiers merely escort convoys 
and enforce exclusion zones— until 
things go wrong. Then public 
opinion reacts and people like 


Douglas Hurd get “very angry". 
Soldiers start killin g and getting 
killed- When we stopped trying to 
police Beirut in 1984 — - a classic 
“humanitarian" operation — thou- 
sands lay dead; over 200 of them 
“ours”. 

The itch to intervene is round 
again. A War Party is in foil ay. 
most strident in foe American 
press. The New York Times, Wash- 
ington Post and International 
Herald Tribune run daily calls to 
arms. Columnists Anthony Lems, 
Jim Hoagland and Leslie Gelb 
rewrite scripts for Oh What a 
Lovely Wart Lewis trumpets Soma- 
lia as a “world scandal" (surely it is 
a Somalian scandal). The aims 
lobby is bade on parade, talking of 
“precision targeting” Serbian guns 
and disabling Serbian transport 
“Serbia cannot win." they crow in 
tones recalling General Westmore- 
land. Soon their bombers wall be 
“taking out terrorist villages". Brit- 
ain’s Paddy Ashdown says that one 
bash on the nose from Our Boys 
will have Johnny Serb crawling 
bade to Belgrade. 

There are already 20,000 foreign 
troops in former Yugoslavia, foe 
largest UN force assembled since 
Korea. That number has topped 
the second largest. 16.000 in 
Phnom Penh, where it is trying to 
decide whether to defend Cambo- 
dian democracy against the rena- 
scent Khmer Rouge or turn tail and 
flee. That awful dilemma was 
predictable from the start of this 
mad venture, but nobody thought 
to think. Undaunted, the UN is 
sending 28,000 Americans ashore 
in Somalia, where each warlord 
has offered them an ominous 
welcome. In Mogadishu, extorting 
aid workers is the only business in 
town. Now it is to be extorting 
Americans. 



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Heading towards a savage war of peace: the West is in danger of being embroiled in an unwinnaWe conflict 


The Herald Tribune reports that 
American strategy in Somalia is 
simple: to intimidate the warlords 
by “blowing-up oneof their pickups 
with an Ml tank”. Then a “polit- 
ical and administrative structure" 
will be set up and the Americans 
can leave by January 20. Much the 
same was said in Vietnam. We are 
told by the Financial Times that “a 
well paid and trained Somali police 
force will have to be established. . . 
Once in place and the cycle of 
criminality broken, foreign troops 
can retreat to a minimum role and 
the UN can sponsor a national 
conference to prepare the way for 
elections." Every report from the 
ground shows this is fantasy. 

Washington wiD have either to 
rule Somalia indefinitely and 
against growing local resistance, or 
support oneof the warlords, swamp 
him with weapons and get out. In 
die latter case, anarchy and famine 
will simply resume 4uitiL as in 
Mozambique and Liberia, exhaus- 
tion ora neighbouring power takes 
over. We leant nothing from foe 
history of these civil ware. The only 
victor is foe arms salesman. The 
only yield a glow of moral content- 
ment Bcrr editorial writers. In Ku- 


wait. foe allies had a legal basis fin- 
intervention and a dear military 
and political goal- No clarify of 
means or ends lies behind action in 
Somalia or Serbia The War Party 
seems unconcerned. The Washing- 
ton Post has a brand new Ameri- 
can ideology to cheer on the troops: 
“Countries that faD to care deoentfy 
for their citizens", it asserts, “dilate 
their daim to sovereignty and 
forfeit invulnerability to outride 
political-military intervention." 


R eally? Is this to be Bill 
Clinton’s America? If so, 
it goes far beyond the 
Cold War doctrines of 
Dulles. Kennedy, Nixon and Kis- 
singer, that foreign intervention 
was justified only ninvhed to save a 
nation from communism. If the 
Post is right three-quarters of foe 
globe is now at risk of attack from 
America or its UN proxies. 

Of course rich countries are 
moved by the horror of war and 
famine beyond their borders. They 
help best by offering shelter to 
refugees and by supporting Chilian 
charities. 1 1 may rarely be feasible to 
insert charity on foe ground by 
main force, without taking sides 


and worsening foe strife, but I 
doubt It That is plainly not the case 
with the siege-breaking convoys of 
Bosnia and the “aid warriors’* that 
will now sustain an anarchic equi- 
librium in S omalia. 

The War Party is motivated not 
by humanitarianisni but by a desire 
to see a particular evO smashed. Its 
human itarianism is proxy for more 
active worldwide engagement by 
foe West after foe ending of the 
Cold War. In principle such com- 
mitment notably by foe US. is no 
bad tiling. It saved Kuwait and 
mitigates American isolationism. 
But as the world saw in the 1970s 
and 1 980s. engagement by outsid- 
ers so easily aggravates conflict: 
then in Vietnam, in Lebanon, in 
Angola, in Sri Lanka; now in 
Bosnia, in Somalia, in Cambodia, 
perhaps again in Iraq, in Armenia, 
even in South Africa. 

American liberalism is behaving 
as if it had found its first just war 
since 1939. There is no sense of 
proportion: every enemy is Hitler. 
Here is a new jihad, a global 
crusade against man’s inhumnify 
to man. a holy war stripped of self- 
interest stripped even of hope of 
victory. Uke all jihads, calm assess- 


ment of costs arid benefits is treated 
as contemptible. Send in the troops 
and damn foe consequences. It is 
every politician’s cop-out and every 
soldier's dread. Such crusaders 
measure their glory in body bags. 

Perhaps there win be a wider war 
in tiie Balkans, in East Africa.' in 
Cambodia. If so. I hope foe outside 
world stays dear, dear with its 
money, its weapons and its moral 
confusion. We can relieve pain but 
we cannot rule foe wodd. Last 
week, America withdrew its last 
troops from the Philippines, a 
century after they first arrived. I 
wonder how soon they will return, 
driven back by the hysterics of 
network television. 

Many think Kipling wrote “The 
White Man’s Burden" to glorify the 
British empire. He did not. He 
wrote it to warn Americans of foe 
perils of empire, when America was 
seizing Subic Bay from the Spanish 
in 1898. Its subtitle was “The 
United States and the Philippine 
Islands". Its message to the arm- 
chair imperialist was Weak 

The ports ye shall not enter. 

The roads ye shall not tread. 


Go make them with your living. 
And mark them with your dead. 


Rooting for a Windsor dig 


IT MAY be an annus horribilis for 
the royal household but the fire 
which devastated Windsor Castle 
could make it an annus mirabilis 
for archaeologists, already abuzz 
with exritment about what might 
be uncovered by foe blaze. If they 
can get at the remains, that is. 

As the Royal Berkshire Resale 
Service issued its somewhat in con- 
ducive report yesterday into foe fire 
a fortnight ago. a team of archaeol- 
ogists from the Central Archaeolo- 
gy Service was still waiting in foe 
palace wings ready to excavate 
material which they believe will 
date from foe twelfth century. 

The archaeologists themselves 
say diplomatically that they have 
been unable to reach the damaged 
areas for safety reasons, but one 
insider said yesterday that the royal 
household was being less than 
helpful. “They are often difficult 
about access and. from what I have 
heard, little has changed." he said. 

Brian Kerr, one of 30 archaeolo- 
gists who will be involved in the 
initial excavation, said at Windsor 
yesterday. “We would certainly 
hope to excavate, going back at 
least as far as the reign of Henry II 
and. who knows, possibly even 
further. This would indude parts of 


the King’s Chamber, the King's 
Hall ana other important 12th- 
century palace buildings." 

Professor Martin Biddle, the 
eminent Oxford medieval archae- 
ologist, says that the Prince of 
Wales, himself a student of archae- 
ology, might get involved: “It is 
such an important matter that I feel 
sure he cannot but be interested." 
English Heritage, in charge of foe 
programme, appears to have its 
hands tied by Buckingham Palace. 
Palace officials refused to com- 
ment “We will not say anything 
until we know about foe restoration 
programme." said one. 



spokesman, denies that the busi- 
nessman is feeling the pinch. “I’m 
sure they will be happy to lend their 
stuff. They know the rules. No one 
is recession-proof but Mrde Savaiy 
is still here and still going strong." 


Ill wind? 


DIARY 


does not have women priests. Hell 
be attending mass. I think he’s 
looking forward to the visit.'’ 


Shelf life 


• The congregation at John Cum- 
mers local church in Ealing 
should not be too alarmed when he 
does not turn up on Sunday 
morning. Gummer, who has re- 
signed his seat on the General 
Synod . has not yet left the Church 
Of England, despite his opposition 
to women priests. But the agricul- 
ture minister will be worshipping 
this Sunday in St Lucia, where he 
flew this weekend to “ talk about 
bananas ” Cummers spokesman 
says: “/ spoke to him on his 
earphone earlier and he told me 
that St Luda’s Anglican church 


DESPITE foe recession, Peter de 
S avary has lost lMe of his entrepre- 
neurial spirit Following news of 
bis Hogmanay "rave” at Uttiecote 
House, foe Elizabethan mansion 
near Hungerford. comes word that 
de S avary is setting up a “personal 
collections" exhibition there. 

De Savaiy has placed an advert 
in this month’s The Field seeking 
“interesting historical collections" 
for foe house’s long gallery. Collec- 
tors are offered foe chance to lend 
their exhibits “free of charge”. 
There is no mention of foe feet that 
de Savaiy charges a £4.80 entry foe 
to the house and grounds. 

David Redfem, de Savary’s 


IF Norman Lamont is still search- 
ing for the economic miracle he 
should take atrip to Florida, where 
inhabitants are just beginning to 
discover the silver lining left by foe 
clouds of hurricane Andrew. A 
University of Florida study shows 
that post-hurricane rebuilding will 
boost the economy until 1995. 
Next year employment is expected 
to grow by 3.8 per cent Had An- 
drew not happened foe growth rate 

would have been 2.8 per cent 
Growth in real personal income, 
0.3 per cent this year, is expected to 
be 4.9 per cent next year, thanks 
largely to insurance pay-outs — a 
prediction to make Lloyd's names 
choke on their champagne. 



• Sir Denis 1118111101*5 renowned equilibrium at Number 10 Downing 
Street is said to have had much to do with tire golf course. That may soon 
be a pleasure offoe past Thatcher, left, disclosed to fellow guests, who 
included Vivien. Duffidd, centre, and Gerald Ronson. right at the £1.000 
a bead Angk>-Isnid tfinner on Thursday night at Guildhall that he had 
cut down his golf. *Tm afraid my bade is rather painful I’m frankly 
playing less and less these days." He does; however, espouse die merits of 
playing the gaww» m a warm climate. “I think the sun would ease my 
back," he added, fuelling speculation that the Thatchers’ next 
incarnation might be as nei^ibours of the Reagans in California. 


his latest product Burleigh, who . 
has just written a poster slogan 
publicising the housing charity ” 
Shelter, was evicted from his 
London flat last weekend. - 

“I had been given a month’s no- 
tice by my landlady.” he says, "bull 
could not find anywhere else and - 
she flew off foe handle. 1 got this > 
phone call at work saying she had 
evicted me." It took him weeks to ‘ 
retrieve his belongings deposit and _ 
advance rent 

Burleigh says that if he had not 
been able to move in with his girl- 
friend, he would have been on foe - 
streets— his family lives in Notting- • 
ham. “I’ve never been homeless be- 
fore and I never want to be again. It 
brought home the importance of 
the Shelter campaign." V 


Pink’un 


Labour coordinating committee is 
bringing out a new magazine. 
Wrth tire support of such tomi- 




WHILE John Smith tried this 
week to modernise the Labour par- 
ty by severing its union links, the 
party's co-ordinating committee 
was taking a step back in foe past 
Set up in the 1 980s as an intellectu- 
al alternative to the hard left, the 


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THE TIMES SATURD AY DECEMBER 5 1992 



AGAINST AGGRESSION 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone 071-782 5000 


D\t West needs a winter of statesmanship to curb a Balkan 


war 


A rthur Koestler onoe warned on 
these pages that a "decade of 
demagogues" in different parts of 
the world might be a matched by a 
"decade of dentists" in the leadership of the 
West He was writing about the Eighties and 
he was wrong. Today, as Serbia struts and 
Bosnia bums, it seems that the great man 
may have been merely misled in his timing. 
European leaders are preparing for next 

week's Edinburgh summit. The talk is of re- 
$ bate and subsidiarity, enlargement and 
Maastricht the subject might as well be 
molars. But. slowly, quietly, and at lower 
levels in the chancelleries of Europe, there is 
growing worry about greater matters: in five 
years’ time, it is said, we may look bade to 
winter. 1 992, and ask why Western govern- 
ments refused to use the weapons they com- 
mand to save Europe from a widening war. 

Any words of pre-emptive military action 
to avert war are still bardy whispered. When 
the whisper is heard, it is muffled and stifled 
by arguments that “nothing can be 
done ... the public would not put up with 
the casualti e s . . . and die Balkans always be- 
have abominably, don’t they?”. On the other 
side of the Atlantic, polity is in flux. America 
acquiesced in the EC’s early, rash insistence 
that this was Europe's problem. Now it 
awaits President Clinton, a man whose 
\ character is shaped both by hatred of the 
Vietnam war and love of John F. Kennedy. 
How will he judge the threat to peace from 
Serbian ambitions? No one knows. 

Everyone in Western public office, anxious 
with reason to avoid intervening militarily in 
a notoriously complex region, has main- 
tained so far that in this nasty little “local" or 
“civil" war, the correct policy is diplomaty 
coupled with a small peacekeeping effort 
and humanitarian assistance. This position, 
though appearing as one of prudence, is a 
gamble that neither addresses, nor was 
designed to address, a real and present 
danger of international conflict Govern- 
ments are only now beginning to consider 
just how combustible the Balkans could be, if 
the war in Bosnia is not stopped. 

Serbian territorial 
l ambitions are not 
confined to Croatia 
and Bosnia; they ex- 
tend to areas only 
thinly inhabited by 
Serbs. Belgrade has 
claims on Macedonia 
ro the south, over 
which two Balkan 
wars have been 
fought this century. 

Cyrus Vance, a con- 
summately cautious 
diplomat, worries 
publicly that "a spark 
from Macedonia 
could ignite the whole region". Serbian 
nationalists are already talking about "a 
weekend in Skopje". Were Serbian forces to 
move south, Bulgaria, Albania and even 
Greece could join a war of partition, reviving 
ancient territorial daims. 

Fighting in Macedonia could spark an 
explosion in Kosovo, which Serbia views as 
I its historical heartland but where Albanians 
form an exploited and bitterly resentful 90 
per cent Muslim majority. A Serb crack- 
down could bring in Albania; Turkey would 
be pressed to intervene by Isl a mic countries, 
which already see the Bosnian war in terms 
of a Christian onslaught against Muslims. 
Two Nato members. Greece and Turkey, 
could be on opposing sides in a wider war. 

The principles that the West laid down 
when fighting first broke out in the former 
Yugoslavia are sound enough. But first in 
Croatia, and now in Bosnia, the West has 
failed to enforce the idea that frontiers 
should be protected from forcible change. 
British, French and other troops have been 

| drawn into the Balkans slowly and without a 

coherent strategy. Nearly 23.000 UN troops 
are policing enclaves in Croatia and ferrying 
food parcels across the war-zones of Bosma- 
Herzegovina. But no Western government 
has accepted the case for sending troops to 
Bosnia to enforce the peace. None even 
countenances the use of force to prevent the 
armed obstruction of the relief effort 
Ronald Reagan said yesterday in the 
Oxford Union that “when the nations of the 
UN commit themselves to medical and food 
relief they should also commit the resources, 
and above all the will, to deliver the supplies 
regardless of roaming bandits who would 
thwart the international consensus’ ■ There 
is tittle sign that he will be heard. 

For months it has been evident that the 
I Serbs will stop fighting and cede territory 
only when their leaders are convinced that 
this is a war they cannot win without 
impoverishment, isolation and unacceptaoie 
casualties. At the moment they are con- 
vinced of the opposite case. Because the UN 
forces are not mandated or equipped^ ngn 
back, their presence may even nmferetM 
Serbs’ conviction that the world has nothing 

to throw at them but words. . 

The Serbs may well be nght. Theresa 
non-interventionist solution whkh._howwer 
cynicaL has all the appeal of simplicity. 
Western meddling, it is said. just prolong 
the agony. The Bosnian Muslims have! lost 
the war. and suffering would be mrtL 
speedily relieved if the w>rfd< came rotenm 
with reality and redrew the Orders baween 
the former Yugoslavia’s repubh^ taking 
account of the aggressors 

Ut no one think foat such a pob^ts free 

of ride There is dangerous pre?* 6 ™ “J 
inaction. Acceptance of Serbian gains woul 
SSurage demagogues and ethnic wtot 
across rScrically ^ery 
and Eastern Europe- A R 
to Serbian success 

European troops out of fighting m the Balk 



ans for the time being. But it would not stop 
the war in Bosnia, or avert the risk of the 
wax’s spreading. The Bosnian Serbs’ hold 
over the lands they have conquered is both 
precarious and contested by Croats as well as 
Muslims: if the Bosnian Muslims were des- 
erted by the West, Sobs and Croats would 
fight over the country’s corpse. The risks of a 
wider conflict would be undiminished. 

There is a second, more far-reaching 
objection to rewarding Serbian aggression. 
Almost 40 countries went to war with Iraq, 
under Western leadership, to defend the 
postwar structure of international law. 
Islamic countries see the West’s readiness to 
counter to Serbian aggression as a test of 
good faith. Should it be proved openly to 
them that the war over Kuwait was no more 
than “a war about ofl", the West will be 
weakened in attempts to win collective action 
in future under the United Nations emblem. 

A much-discussed alternative to direct 
Western intervention would be to send UN 
troops to Macedonia and Kosovo, while 
arming and t rainin g Bosnia’s defenders 
much as the West armed the Afghan 
mujahideen. Many Bosnians ask for noth- 
ing more. But it would take years to forge 
untrained volunteers into a fighting force. 

The West must test the Serbs’ will and 
capacity to continue the fight Meaningless 
bluff will not work. What is needed is the 
threat of a timetable, leading to military 
enforcement of the peace under either 
Chapter VII or Chapter VIII of the UN 
Charter. Both out of principle and to win 
Russian assent to collective action against 
fellow-Slavs, the UN must be even-handed. 
Croatia should be put under notice of UN 
sanctions unless it withdraws all troops from 
Herzegovina and ceases to support Bosnian 
Croat operations there. 

The first step must be to enforce the UN 
ban on flights over Bosnia, routinely violated 
by file Serbs, shooting down aircraft and 
destroying any bases from which they take 
off. Britain. France; Spain and Canada fear 
that their troops would come under Serb 
fire: they are coming under fire now. The 
answer is to empower 
them to return fire in 
good earnest, rather 
than merely in self- 
defence. 

The Bosnian Serbs 
are heavily reliant on 
Belgrade for money, 
food and munitions. 
Serbia should be 
warned that unless 
these deliveries cease, 
air power will also be 
used to bombard de- 
pots and strategic 
routes into Bosnia. 

A year ago. The 
Times argued that before recognising Bos- 
nia, the UN must dispatch peacekeepers to 
prevent the war spreading from Croatia. 
That advice was ignored. The EC must not 
repeat the same mistake; Macedonia must 
receive the thousand UN troops it has 
requested before, not after, recognition. 

Western governments should simulta- 
neously prepare for the dispatch of a larger 
UN force, equipped “to enforce the peace by 
all available means” if Serbia has not 
implemented a genuine ceasefire by a given 
dale, formally accepted the principle that 
frontiers will not be changed by force and 
started to negotiate seriously. 

Eveiy government winch commits troops 
to such a force must be prepared for the 
possibility that they will have to be used in 
combat There will be casualties, and risks to 
the civilian population- But civilians are 
already suffering horribly, and opponents of 
intervention exaggerate both the feats of 
Tito’s partisans against the Germans in die 
last war and the fighting prowess of the 
Serbs in this war. 

War against Serbia might indeed demand 
1 00.000 or more troops, the figure bandied 
around the dentists’ waiting rooms of the 
free world. But war against Serbia is not 
and should not be, considered. The UN 
should be there to stop the fighting and push 
the Serbs (and Croats) back from Bosnian 
territory taken by force. With the support of 
air power. Nato’s logistical resources and 
superior training and equipment a smaller 
force could turn the tide. 

None of tins will happen without the 
leadership of Britain, France and America 
— the countries which would have to contrib- 
ute most of the frontline troops. Little of that 
is apparent Nato is, as Mr Reagan said 
yesterday, “tragically Inactive". 

T he need for a tougher Western, 
approach is daily spelled out in 
blood. Britain could and should 
use the special influence it has in 
Washington during a change of presidemy. 
But unless Britain can overcome its reluc- 
tance to take military action, there is litfle 
chance of America joining Europe in action 
for which US military support at least by air 
and sea. is indispensable. 

Much has changed since the summer in 
Luxembourg when the EC first set out to 
mediate, proclaiming that “the hour of 
Europe" had come. Catalysts for a new 
strategy will indude Western public horror 
at the winter suffering in Bosnia and the 
impression thai a swelling refugee exodus 
makes on the most cynical of Western 
governments. That is the optimist’s scenario. 
The pessimist’s is that action may be forced 
on the West by the crisis on Nato’s southern 
flank, as the third Balkan war begins. 

To wait until that happens cannot be in 
the interests of the West Compassion has 
already drawn international forces into 
Bosnia. Interest now joins with compassion. 
Leadership is needed to promote that truth. 


Maastricht and 
referendums 

From Mr George Cunningham 

Sir. If tiie Deputy Speaker, despite his 
indication that he is still open to 
persuasion on v the matter (report 
December 2), in the end refuses to 
allow members of Parliament to vote 
on an effective amendment request- 
ing a referendum before the Maas- 
tricht treaty is built into British law, it 
will be a significant reflection on the 
role of the Chair as defender of the 
rights of the House as a whole. 

The bills on Scottish and Welsh 
devolution in the 1970s did not 
initially indude provision for referen- 
dums; amendments requiring them 
were addled during consideration in 
the House. It cannot therefore be 
argued that a referendum clause is 
“outside tire scope of the bllT, the 
usual ground for ruling an amend- 
ment out of order. 

As to the argument that it is 
improper for private members, as 
against the government, to initiate 
proposals having expenditure im- 
plications. the fact is that masses of 
amendments with some such implica- 
tions are accepted every session and 
that they normally fall foul of the rule 
only if they directly and specifically 
authorise money to be spent. Even the 
House of Lords, theoretically de- 
barred from considering money mat- 
ters, has found ways of advancing 
proposals which raise expenditure. 

In the light of the Deputy Speaker's 
remark that members should exercise 
greater ingenuity in hying to draft a 
referendum amendment perhaps the 
greatest danger is that he will accept 
only an “opinion-expressing motion" 
which the government will be free to 
accept or reject This wnfl not do; it is 
for the House finall y to decide the 
issue, not the government 

The Speaker and all her deputies 
must accept their responsibility to see 
that members are able to do all nat- 
ural things arising on draft legislation 
placed before them. If they do not one 
will have to condude that the Chair is 
more concerned to please the govern- 
ment than to uphold the rights of the 
House, as it has sworn to do. 

Yours faithfully. 

GEORGE CUNNINGHAM 
(Labour MP for Islington 
South, 1970-83), 

28 Manor Gardens. 

Hampton, Middlesex 
December 2. 

From Mr Martin Howe 

Sir. On November 3, just before the 
Maastricht “paving" debate, you re- 
ported the prime minister as reassur- 
ing Conservative MPs that the pre- 
amble to the Maastricht treaty is just 
“Eurowaffle" which has “no legal 
force whatever". 

This is puzzling. Probably the angle 
most fundamental constitutional case 
to have oome before the European 
Court of Justice was Van Gend en 
Loos 11963] ECR 1. This established 
die principle that Community law is 
directly applicable and “constitutes a 
new legal order, the subjects of which 
comprise not only Member States but 
also their nationals". The court's 
reasoning was explicitly based on “the 
preamble to the [Rome] Treaty which 
refers not only to governments but to 
peoples". 

Van Gend en Loos is one of the best 
known decisions of the European 
court and is taught to students on 
elementary courses about European 
Community law. It is disturbing that 
the advice apparently given to the 
prime minister should contain so 
basic a misconception, since it calls 
into question the quality of the advice 
he is receiving on other aspects of this 
treaty. 

Yours faithfully, 

MARTIN HOWE, 

Francis Taylor Building, 

Temple. EC4. 

December 1. 


Paying the piper 

From the Secretivy-GenemI 
of the Arts Council of 
Great Britain 

Sir, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies refers 
(letter, December 3) to a report in 77te 
Times in which I was quoted as saying 
that giving money to composers was 
“not directly related" to foe Arts 
Council’s policy of support for artists. 

The quotation is self-evident and 
arrant nonsense and must have arisen 
from a misinterpretation of what was 
said. In fact support for composers is a 
perfect example of foe policy to which 
1 referred — the Arts Council exists to 
serve the arts. 

Yours sincerely 

ANTHONY EVERITT, 

Secretary-General 

The Arts Council of Great Britain, 

1 4 Great Peter Street, SW 1 . 
December3. 


Fit and proper 

From DtP. Cloister 

Sir. The decision by foe Danish 
company Lego to buSd a theme park 
on the site of the former Windsor 
safari park (report. December 3) 
should crane as welcome news for 
some of those hit by the recession in 
this area, par tieulariy small firms of 
builders, or should I say firms of small 
builders. 

Yews faithfully. 

P-GIAISTER. 

3 InstowRoad, 

Eariey, Reading, Berkshire, 
December 3. 


John Glimmer's reasons for quitting synod examined 


From the Reverend D. B. Webb 

Sir, John Gummer's resignation from 
the General Synod (report, December 
2) and foe reasons advanced for it 
raise some issues that call for clarifica- 
tion. 

It is not foe intention of foe General 
Synod “to change foe orders”, but 
merely to admit to the priesthood 
people without distinction of gender. 

Mr Gurnmer mentions "the au- 
thority of the (Church) fathers". They 
have many things to say about foe 
qualities required in priests: love of 
God, love of foe people, humility, lack 
of ambition, gifts of intelligence and 
oratory, holiness, etc., but they hardly 
ever mention masculinity. These gifts 
can be found in women. 

Mr Cummer daims foe Church 
“has arrogated to itself power it could 
not possibly have”. Aitide XX says: 
Tbe Church hath power to decree Rites or 
Ceremonies, and authority in Con u ove isi es 
of Faith: And yet it is not lawful for die 
Church to ordain any thing that is contrary 
co God's WoitJ written . . . 

I have looked carefully to see 
whether the ordination of women is 
consonant with Scripture, and believe 
it is. There is nothing in Article XX 
about “Catholic tradition”, although 
Aitide X2X says: “the Church of 
Rome bath erred, not only in their 
lives and manner of Ceremonies, but 
also in mailers of Faith". There is no 
reason why we should have to wait for 
Rome in this matter . 

Yours etc, 

DAVID WEBB, 

St James’ Vicarage, Church Lane, 
Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire. 
December 2. 

From Mr Roger Fry 

Sir. Aitide 8 of schedule 2 of foe 
Synodical Government Measure, 
1969 enables foe General Synod of 
foe Church of England to pass 
measures and canons that change the 

n nrffnal 

Has Mr John Gummer, who joined 
the synod in 1979, only now discov- 
ered he disagrees with the constitu- 
tion? 

Yours faithfully, 

ROGER FRY 
(Member, House of Laity). 

1 1 Evelegh Road. Fadington, 
Portsmouth. Hampshire. 

December 2. 

From Sir Leslie Fielding 

Sir, While sympathising with John 
Gummer. I have resigned after two 
years from foe General Synod for 
different reasons. 

Like many middfeof-the-road An- 
glicans. I am agnostic about women 
priests. But any such really major 
move ought to be taken only by an 
equally major consensus within the 
Church of England. The synod has 


not demonstrated such a consensus, 
in part because it is a flawed and self- 
suspecting institution. 

One of the last acts of the previous 
General Synod was to call for a 
radical reappraisal of its own com- 
position. purposes and procedures. 
One of the next acts of the present 
General Synod will be to effect that 
overhaul Meanwhile it is in no 
position fundamentally to modify the 
apostolic priesthood by qualified 
majority voting, as if it were fixing 
subsidies on oilseed rape in Brussels. 

The decision on women priests was 
un- Anglican, and I want no part in 
the body which took it 

Yours faithfully, 

LESLIE FIELDING 
(Vice Chancellor. University of 
Sussex. 1987-92). 

Sutton Court Stanton Lacy. 

Ludlow, Shropshire 
December 2. 

From Mrs Caroline Armitage 

Sir, In resigning from the General 
Synod, Mr Gummer stated that he 
felt “excluded". How does he think 
women members of the Church have 
felt for centuries? 

Yours sincerely, 

CAROLINE D. ARMITAGE. 

33a Spencers Road. 

Horsham, West Sussex. 

December 2. 

From the Chaplain of Christ’s 
College, Cambridge 

Sir, The Dean of Queens’ College 
Cambridge. Brian Hebblethwaite 
(letter, November 28). accuses the 
former Bishop of London of “theo- 
logical illiteracy — in thinking there to 
be a serious doorinal issue behind the 
decision to ordain women priests”. 
However, there are, I suggest several 
serious theological issues behind that 
decision. 

First there is foe place of foe Bible 
in flie decision-making process of the 
church. The New Testament appears 
to teach that women should not be in 
positions of ultimate teaching au- 
thority (I Timothy it 1 2). Should that 
be decisive for tbe modem Church? If 
not on what basis do we decide which 
passages are to be followed and which 
are not? 

The second issue it raises is the 
place of foe wider Church in foe 
decision-making process of the 
Church of England. Is it enough to 
get a two-thirds majority of General 
Synod, or should some consensus first 
be readied within “the one, holy, 
catholic and apostolic Church” of 
which foe Church of England daims 
tobeapart? 

Thirdly, there is the relationship 
between men and women in the 
creation purposes of God. Is that 
relationship to be symmetrical or 


complementary? Does equality of 
status require identity of role? 

The Dean of Queens’ may disagree 
with the former Bishop of London on 
the answers to these questions, but 
they are dearly issues foal are both 
theological and serious. Just how 
serious can be gauged from the fact 
that belief in the virgin birth or the 
physical resurrection are not pre- 
requisites for episcopal appointment 
but belief in the ordination of women 
may well now be required. 

Yours faithfully, 

MICHAEL LLOYD, 

Chaplain, 

Christ’s College. Cambridge. 

From Mr Colin W. V. McC leery 

Sir, The suggestion from Simon 
Hughes, MP (report December 2, 
early editions), that Mr Gummer 
“should accept foe democratic view of 
the Church” epitomises all that is 
wrong with the Church of England. If 
Anglican doctrine and orders are 
based on Scripture they cannot also be 
determined by "democratic" vote. 

Yours sincerely (faithfully?), 

C. W. V. McCLEERY, 

Orchard House. 

Rod borough Common, 

Stroud. Gloucestershire 
December 2. 

From Mrs Susan Carson-Rowland 

Sir, Since the minute but vociferous 
minority of Catholic women belong- 
ing to foe Catholic Women’s Network 
and St Joan's Alliance has been 
pontificating for years about the 
necessity of women’s ordination, it is 
depressing to read Ruth Gledhill's 
report (November 20) that a “new 
lobby” is being formed. 

These groups, knowing well that 
foe Church has declared itself not 
unwilling, but unable , to ordain 
women to the priesthood, dearly 
believe that their personal opinions 
have greater validity. With their 
breathless admiration for the “pro- 
phetic and courageous decision" of 
foe Church of England synod, it is 
mysterious foal they do not plan to go 
where their hearts and convictions lie 
instead of subjecting foeir Catholic 
brethren to further displays of bitter- 
ness and discontent 

The only viable solution is for 
disaffected members of both commu- 
nions to change places. As with foe 
exchange of council houses, advertise- 
ments for an opposite number could 
be placed in the personal columns. 
Very ecumenical and exduding all 
possible hint of the dreaded pros- 
dytism or “poaching”. 

Yours faithfully, 

SUSAN CARSON-ROWLAND. 
Bams tead , 

14 1 Ecdesfidd Road, Chapel town, 
Sheffield, South Yorkshire 


Musical variety 

From Mr Simon Berry 

Sir, Susan Elkin (“Oh for a song to 
sing O!", November 23) rightly points 
out that there is much to be gained 
from school performances of Gilbert 
and Sullivan. My school has mounted 
two fully staged performances re- 
cently — Trial by Jury and The 
Mikado. However, she is quite wrong 
to criticise schools for investigating 
other genres. Any stage performance 
is an ideal method of educating across 
the traditional boundaries of foe 
curricular subjects, irrespective of its 
thane. 

Ms Elkin obviously revels in foe 
parody and pastiche in Sullivan's 
scores. Surely it is easier for students 
to appreciate these nuances after 
performances of works such as Magic 
Flute or Dido and Aeneas? 

Many Britten operas, for instance, 
are planned around foe talents of 
school musicians. 


I would always shy away from 
asking any but the very best of school 
violinists to tackle a G&S part When 
it comes to Bugsy Malone and Grease 
we should never forget the exacting 
demands for dancers that would vie in 
difficulty with any bunch of G&S 
sailors merrily turning the capstan. 

No musical style is to be damned, 
none should take precedence. G&S 
should take an equal place with all 
styles. Perhaps, then, one Savoy 
operetta every five years? 

Sincerely, 

SIMON BERRY 
(Director of Music). 

Lady Margaret School 
Parson’s Green. SW6. 

November 25. 

From Miss Hazel R. Morgan 

Sir, Susan Elkin believes that “the 
educational gain" of schools perform- 
ing Gilbert, and Sullivan operettas 
“would be considerable". So might 
foe vocal loss. 


These works were written for mar 
tore singers. They require a reliable 
vocal technique, strong projection 
(spoken and sung) of the “rich 
vocabulary”, and plenty of stamina. 
Even as a trained singer I have always 
found G&S hard on the voice: the 
dosing chorus of The Mikado feds as 
demanding as Beethoven’s Choral 
Symphony. 

School-age voices, female as well as 
male, are at a very sensitive stage of 
development and should not be over- 
stressed. no matter how mature they 
may sound. Indeed, it is foe preco- 
cious, enthusiasticyoungsteis who are 
at greatest risk of permanent damage. 

Even if all the notes are there, 
unless the child has learned tire 
correct method of breathing it is 
unlikely that he or she wfil be able to 
sustain a role written for an adult. 

Yours sincerely, 

HAZEL R. MORGAN. 

SO Rickstones Road, Witham, Essex. 
November 27. 


Prison education 

From Mr/. Tall 

Sir, As a prisoner in foe young 
offender system I have benefited 
greatly from the education provided 
in prison. In foe past two yean in 
custody I have gained three A levels 
(two As, one Bj and I will soon acquire 
a vocational training qualification. 
More importantly, I have seen many 
other inmates, often lacking in the 
most basic academic skills, gain so 
much from foe education department 
that I am convinced it is worth its 
weight in gold. 

I am thus dismayed by foe govern- 
ment’s plan (report, August 24) to 
contract out these services to the 
private sector from April 1 , 1 993. Few 
doubt this w£D prove to be a system 
where low cash bids are aB-important, 
with little regard to quality and to the 
harm which would be caused by foe 
uncertainty involved. This will lad. I 
believe, to disruption to foe education 
programme in 1 993 and a reduction 
in education standards. 

For foe government cost-cutting is 
dearly the order of foe day. Sadly, this 
will result in a raw deal for prisoners 
desperately seeking a way out of foe 
rut of c riminali ty, which ultimately 
will reflect on society in general 

Youis faithfully. 

J.TALL, 

HM Young Offender Institution, 
Bierton Road. 

Aylesbury. Buckinghamshire. 


Letters should cany a daytime 
telephone num ber. They may be 
faxed to 071-782 5046. 


Services and shows 

From Dr Derm Coshman 

Sir. Graham Young (letter. December 
2) expresses disquiet that actors and 
singers take part in memorial services 
in church. 

Surely they are using God-given 
talents, in God’s house, in tire good 
service of others — perhaps friends or 
relations. I find foal wholly appro- 
priate. 

Yours faithfully, 

DENIS CASHMAN. 

4 Derwent Road, 

Cullercoais, Tyne and Wear. 
December 2. 


Missing millions 

From Mr Peter J. Hyde 

Sir, II after foe public spending 
auditor discovered irregular pay- 
ments totalling £1,218.000 for an 
efficiency incentive scheme (report, 
December 3), the Treasury decides to 
write off the money as a loss and the 
defence ministry neither takes disci- 
plinary action nor tries to recover any 
of foe money, why should time and 
money be wasted m having an audit 
at all? 

Perhaps, to minimise the auditors’ 
disDhisionroent and frustration, they 
might be allowed to share in the 
recreational and social facilities in- 
volved in the missing £1 .2 million and 
not spend foeir time auditing. 

Youis sincerely, 

PETER J. HYDE, 

1 5 Elm Green Close, Worcester. 
December 3. 


life, death and caring 

From Professor and Mrs David Miers 

Sir. Correspondence on the case of 
Tony Bland (November 21, 23, 27) 
has not addressed the physical, 
psychological and ethical challenges 
which would face those charged with 
caring for. yet withdrawing nourish- 
ment from a living body. 

Further questions for public dis- 
cussion. and legal address, are 
whether the responsible physician can 
be said to speak for all professionals 
involved in cans, and whether foe 
interests of lay carers who are not 
relatives can be identified and consid- 
ered. 

The complexity of caring should not 
be ignored. 

Yours sincerely. 

DAVID MIERS. 

MARGARET MIERS, 

69 Church Road. Whitchurch. 
Cardiff. South Glamorgan. 
November 29. 


A green shoot? 

From Mr Anthony Herschel Hill 

Sir. At long last I have proof the 
recession is at an end and recovery is 
at hand. The bank statement for my 
deposit account shows: balance 0.00; 
interest, 0.02; less tax, 0.01; balance, 
00 . 01 . 

Youis sincerely, 

ANTHONY HERSCHEL HILL, 

70 Prebend Street, Ni. 


Weekend Money letters, page 24 



THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1952 


: KP.-VI 



European Institute 
for die Media 


Church news 


Forthcoming 


COURT CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
.'December 4: The Princess RqyaL 

■Golonel.-in- Chief. uita)20th 

■ King's Hussars. today attended 
.the King's Royal Hussars' Amat- 
-tarnation Parade at York Bar- 
racks. Munster, Germany, and 
was received by the Colonel of the 
King's Royal Hussars (Major Gen- 

; eral John Fried bergeri and the 

- Colond of the I4th/20th King's 
4 H(issus (Major General Sir M ich- 

ael Palmer). 

. Mrs David Bowes Lyon was in 
attendance. 

■ Her Royal Highness, Cokmd- 
• in -Chief, The Worcestershire and 
. Sherwood Foresters Regiment, 
•was represented at the Thonfcs- 

- giving Service far Lieutenant Coto- 
•rfd John White at Sherborne 
j Abbey by Colonel Thomas White, 


Honorary Colonel of the 4th 
Battalion. 


On the occasion of the Con- 
sultation an the Broadcast Media 
and the Citizens of Europe die 
I ostitute last evening gave a dinner 
ai Leeds Casde, Kero. Lord Thom- 
son of MoniEeth presided and 
Lord Aldington. Dr Francisco 
Balsemao and Sir Jack StewfUT 
Clark also spoke. Among those 
present were: 

The Ambassadors at Belgium. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 4: The Prince of Wales 
was installed as Foreign Associate 
Member of the Academic des 
Sciences Morales et Politiques at 
the iosdtut de France in Paris. 

Mr Peter Westmacott was in 
attendance. 


YORK HOUSE. 

ST JAMES’S PALACE 
The Duke of Kent. Chancellor of 
the University of Surrey, this 
afternoon presided at the Confer- 
ment of Degrees Ceremony in 
Guildford Cathedral and later 
attended a dinner for ho no ray 
graduates at the University. 

Commander Roger Walker. 
RN. was in attendance. 


Republic, Mr Boris Bergam. Mr 
Kenneth Bfytfl. Dr Manyn Bond. Mr 
Adam CtesfetW. Mis Liubov aomaia. 
Monsieur Claude coma mine. 
Madame Michelle Cota, mb Jocelyn 
Hey. Mr Peter HetuL Mr EnUl 
Kapudailev, Mr Teodor Kefcn, Mr 
Richard Labanavsfcls. Professor 
Gottfried Lelbbrand. Mr peter Melee. 
Mr ivo Matdte. Signor Luigi Mamtcci. 
Mr Alexei PanJdn. Mr Nenad Fejlc. Mr 
Davtd Plowright. Mr Anthony 
PtaeneU. Sir Frank Roberts, Mr 
MUorad Roganovtc. Mr Dorel Sand or. 
Mr Richard Scfcoonhoven, Mr Jan Set 
Mr colln Shaw. Mr Paul Slsa. Herr 


Appoaffmefos 
Next Archdeacon of Ely 
The Rev Canon Jeffrey Watson. 
View. Bineroe. and Rural Dean of 
Southampton, diocese Windresten 
to be Archdeacon of Ely. succeed- 
ing the Ven David Water, who is 
retiring in Manfo. 

The Rev Colin Fletcher, Vicar. Hoty 
Trinity. Margate, and Rural Dean of 
Thanet (Canterbury): to be Arch- 
bishop-* chaplain to Lambeth Palace) 
from March 1. 1993. succeeding the 
Rev Canon Graham Junes, who is ro 
be Suffragan Bishop of St Germans. In 
the diocese of Tram. 

The Rev Gordon Reid. vicarGeneral of 
the diocese In Europe: to be also 
Canon of Gibraltar Cathedral 
(Europe). 

The Rev Nicholas Ash. Assistant 
Curate. Hen ha/n (Gaildfonfr to he 
Prtest-ln-cbsrge, Fiookburgb 
(Carlisle). 

The Rev Lewis Atkinson, vicar, St 
Fun's, Wordsworth Avenue. Sheffield: 
to be Vicar, The Ascension church. 
Ougtuftuidge (Sheffield}. 


The Rev David Barnes. C u rate 
Mlnlster-ln-Sheppey. w special 
responsibility for st Peters Haifaw to 
tovuar. Ash. St Nicholas * 
westmarsh (Canterbury). 

The Rev Hugh Burton. PritsMa- 
chargt Paddngton w NotmantoiHO- 
HeamT a be Wear, Paddngton w 
Norman to a-te-Hcath (Leicester). 

Ihe Rev Salty a Chapman. Deacon, St 

Mantes' stoneydelpb: to be Team 
vicar. Short Heath Team Ministry 
(umneka 

The Rev Robert Oifton. Rg»r. 
Cuifont West Stow, worqweU, 
Fiemmon. Hen grave ana inemoni: » 
be also Rural Dean Of Thingoe (St 
Edqundsbuiy and Ipswteh). 

The Rev Helen Connell. Assistant 
Chaplain at Grimsby District General 
Hospital (Lincoln): to be tiaplaln of 
Kem and canterbury Hospital. 

The Rev Brian Davis. Vicar. Hinckley 


Team Vletr. Budcnail w Bagnail Team 
Ministry (UshfldiO. 

The Rev peter Golrttbarpe, Midlands 


Area secretary. Church's Ministry 
Among Jews: to be Vicar. Letton and 
Albrtgstos w BatOeffeKl (Uchffdd). 
The Rev Jonathan cordon. Assistant 
Curate. St Michael -s, TUehuot 
(Oxford}: to be Team Vicar, stoke Team 


mamages 


A! 


Ministry, wtzh special responsibility 
for All Saints. Hahlar (Lichfield}. 

The Rev Frederick Harwood. Honorary 
curate Madron (Truro): to be 
precentor of the Cathedral Church of 
the Holy Trinity (Europe). 

The Rev Anthony Hogg. PrtesMn- 
charge. Hsnney. Denchworfo. East 
Chahow: to be vicar, money, 
Denchwoith. East cnaiiow (OK&nd). 
The Rev Orahame Jones, parish 
Evangelist. SfaeOlngtaotpe (Unoofay. 
to be Parish Evangelist Booker, High 
wyeombe (Oxford). 

-me Rev George Moffat vicar, st Maty 
Bte VIrgtre Jonfo^El msalb to^ be Team 

The Rev Richard Newton. Assistant 


St Slaty. Leicester: n be also Rural 
Dean of sparfceoboe west (Leiceaeff. 
The Rev Roger Driver. Assistant 
Curate St Peter. Wooten; to be Pdert- 
liHdiarge. St PauL Famkeney 
(Liverpool), 

The Rev Mark East. AsdMun curate 
Daltoo-te-Ftzrness (Carlisle): to be 


MrDJKJ.CaiT 
and Miss A.C. Tgytor 

The engagement is announced 
between Davkl, Hrtetr son of Mr 
and Mb John Carr, of GrealGten, 
Leicestershire, and Amber, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Peter Taylor, of Heme Bay, Kent 


cnran». stodomod (Bristol): to be 
Assistant Curate. 5t Martin. Dorking, 


Assistant Conte. 5t Manta, 
w St Barnabas. Ranmoreu w 
IbHUy (orPKham Church (Gi 


Mr A. ChamUm 
. n»d Miss J. Ashbofixn 

The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, eidest son of Mr 
and Mrs Ed ChamKin, of 
Amarillo. Texas, and Jo, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Julian 

Ashbourn. of Berkbamsted. 


Klaus Sch Otz. Mr Andrew Taussig. 
Miss Tflnde vajda. Madame Sound 
wade. Professor George Wedeu, Mr 
Brian Wenham and Mr wfli wyun. 


Weekend birthdays 


Lundieon 


European Court 
.of Justice 


Today's royal 
engagements 


The Grand Duke of Luxembourg 
attended a formal session of the 
Court of Justice of the European 
.Communities held yesterday in 
Luxembourg to mark the 40th 
anniversary of ns establishment 
Mr Ole- Due. president of the 
,inirt. presided. 

Mr Egon Klepsch. President of 
,ihe European Parliament. Lord 
Mackav of Gash fern, Lord Chan- 
cellor. Mr Jacques Defats, presi- 
•dent or the commission. Mr 
-Jacques Sanrer, Prime Ministerof 
i the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, 
and Lord Keith of Kinkel also 
■spoke. 


The Duke of York wfl attend the 
Falkland Island Association's 
wreath-laying cerem o n y at the 
Cenotaph at 10.45. 

Princess Alexandra win attend a 
gala performance of The Nut- 
cracker by the English National 
Ballet at the Theatre RqyaL Nor- 
wich, at 7.25. 


“Saints and Sinners" CSnb 
Mr Ian Irvine, Chairman of the 
"Saints and Sinners” Chib, pre- 
sided at foe Christmas luncheon 
held yesterday at die Savoy HoteL 
Mr Gilbert Gray. QC, was die 
principal guest Viscount Tony- 
pandy. Mr Ned Sherrin and Mr 
Nefl Benson also spoke. 


Service dinner 


Appointment 


Mr Nigel Hamilton Nicholls, an 
Assistant Under-Secretary of Stale, 
Ministry of Defence, has become 
Cleric of the Privy CounriL 


1st Regiment Royal Horae 
Anffleiy 

Past and present members of 1st 
Regiment Royal Horae Artillery 
held their annual Reunion Dinner 
at Woolwich last night General 
Sir Edward Burgess was foe 
Prinripai Guest 


TODAY: Viscount Bridgeman. 
62; Mr Jose Carreras, tenor. 46; 
Lord Chalfont 73: Miss Lucie 
Clayton, model agent 64; Sir 
William Downward, forma- Laid 
Lieutenant of Greater M anchester, 
80: Major-General H.R.B. Foote, 
vc, 88; Mr PJ. Grant chairman. 
Sun Life Assurance Society. 63; 
Sir Peter Kitcatt Speaker's Sec- 
retary. 65; Little Richard, 
rock'n'roll singer. 57; the Ead of 
Longford, KG. 87; Lord Mat- 
thews, 73; Mr Sheridan Mortey, 
author and broadcaster. 51; Laid 
Napier and Ettridi 62; Lord 
Nathan. 70: Lord Rotherwkk. 80; 
Mr Jeremy Sandfoid. writer, SB; 
the Earl of Scarbrough, 60; Mr 
Harold- Sehag-Montefiore, bar- 
rister, 68; Mr Bill Skin, chief 
constable. Hertfordshire, 51: 
Dame Mary Smieton. civil ser- 
vant 90. 


TOMORROW: Lord Ashley of 


Stoke, CH. 70; Mr David Barons, 
racehorse trainer. 56; the Right 
Rev Patrick Barry. Abbot of 
Ampfeforth. 75: Mr Dave 
Brabeck. jazz pianist 72: Vice- 
Admiral Sir John Cartel), 63: Lord 
Ointon-Davis. 64; Air Marshal 
Sir John Curtiss, 68; Lord Fmsfe 
73; Earl Granville. 74; Mr Derek 
HBL artist 76; Mr Jonathan King, 
br oadcas ter. 48; Sir Richard 
Upyd. deputy chairman. HID Sam- 
uel Bank. 64; Sir Nicholas Lyefl, 
QC MP. 54; the Right Rev Eric 
Mercer, former Bishop of Exeter. 
75; Sir George Pinker, former 
Surgeon-Gynaecologist to The 
Queen, 68; Lord Porter of 
Luddenham, OM, 72; Sir Bryan 
Thwaites. former chairman. Wes- 
sex Regional Health Authority. 69; 
Mr Charltxe Van re , ^irennr and 
theatrical producer. 63: the Right 
Rev Peter Walker, former Bishop 
of E ty. 73; Mr Peter WDhy. 
cricketer. 43. 



MrW.BM.Coky 
and Miss CX. Dairy 

The engagement is announced 
between WHBazn. son of the late 
Mr and Mis Maitland Coley, of 
M amble. Worcestershire, and 
Catherine; youngest daughter of 
Mr and Mis John Daley, of 
Chippenham. Wiltshire. 


Mr NJ. Curran 
and Miss R-E. M«K 

The engagement is announced 
between Nick, younger son of Mr 
and Mis PJ- Curran, of Dorking. 
Surety, and Rachel, younger 
daughter of Mr Anthony Morse 
and Mb Fiona Ruddle, of 
Leicestershire. 


Lord Taykrr of Gosfdrth, 
the Lord Chief Justice, 
yesterday received an hon- 
orary degree in law at die 
University of Northumbria 


Mr CM. Hamilton 
and Miss N.W. Taylor 
The engagement is announced in 
Hong Kong between Charles, 
younger son of Mr and Mrs 
Michael Hamilton, of Exmoulh. 
and Nicola, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Christopher Taylor, 
of West Orihin gtoE 


Dr A. Hubbard 
and Miss S. Ddrqy 
The engagement is announced 
between Adrian, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs John Hubbard, of 
Holton St Maty. Suffolk, and 
Sarah, elder daughter of District 
Judge and Mrs Buxton Delray, of 
Boton. Lancashire. 

Mr J.F. Nelson 

and Miss A. Sevastopol!) 

The engagement is annomosd 
between Julian, son of Mr and 
Mis K.M. Nelson, of Berlin, 
Germany, and Alexandra, only 
daughter of Mr and Mm J.D. 
Sevasmpulo. of Ottershaw, Surrey; 
Dr L. Sbaddeton-Fergus 
and Mi8g J. McOe H aud 
The engagement is announced 
between Lachlan, only son of Mr 
Ftands Shaddeton-Ftagusand the 
late Mrs Grace Sbaddeton- 
Fergus, of Stratford-upon-Avon, 
and Julia, daughter of Mr an) 
Mrs Frank McQeQand. of 
Melbourne, Australia. 

MrRJLA. Wallis 
and Miss C.EJL Douglas 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard Nod ABea. son 
of Mr and Mrs Allen Wallis; 
of Hampshire, and Catherine 
Elizabeth Louise, daughter of the 
late Captain the Rev Peter Douglas 
and of Mrs Peter Douglas, of 
Devon. 

MrN-M. Williams 
and Miss A.E. Bates ‘ 

The engagement is announced 
between NeaL son of Mr and Mrs 
Eric WOliams. of SotihuD. West 
Midlands, and Anna, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs David Bates, of 
Ludlow. Shropshire. 


Church services tomorrow 


'BIRMINGHAM CATHEDRAL: ! 1 
Chora] Eucb. Darloe In E. Responses & 


Teach me O Lord (Byrd), o soJutoris 
h ostia (Nicholson). Rev Dr Maureen 


Palmer 4 Chora) E, Responses (Byrd). 
Stanford in B flat. Teach me O Lord 
i Atwood), canon Alan Luff. 

.CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL: 8 HG 
n JO M, Rev R H watts; 1 1 S Euch. 
Mtsn Brevis (WaJtonL Here wc bring 
new water (Britten), The Dean; 3. IS E. 
^Responses (Statham), Stanford In G. 
vox. dicentls (Nay lop: 4 JO King's 


School Community Carol Sendee. Our 
'Lady or undercroft; 6J0 Sermon A 
t Compline. The Archdeacon 
Carlisle cathedral: iojo s 
E uch. Nun Komm 1 . der Helden 
.Holland (Buxtehude). Prelude and 
Fugue In F (Bach). Archdeacon Colin 
sunnard: 3 E. Money Responses. 
Short Service (Gibbons), They word Is 
«a lantern (Purcell), voluntary tor 
Double argon (PurceUk 6 jq Night 
. prayers, Mrs Joan Barham. 
CHELMSFORD CATHEDRAL' 7J0 
MP!S HG9J0 Parish C A Parade. The 
; word or God In the Old Testament. 
p Rev J. Jones; U .15 sung Euch. Mtssa 
. ere\1s (Berkeley), o Sacrum amvlvhim 
i Messiaen), Canon Barry Thompson; 3 
'Willow Ttee Carol Sendee; 4. 4 5 Round 
Table Carols: 6 Choral E. Reponses 
..idyTd). Rememha now dry creator 
. (Stegall), me provost 
. COVENTRY CATHEDRAL: 740 MP 
(Gethsamane Chapel); 8 c (Lady 
^Chapel): IOJO Cathedral Euch. Mlssa 
de An gel is (Eyrie), o Lord increase my 
faith (Loosemore). Love bode me 
.welcome (Vaughan Williams). Rev 
: David Robinson. 5 JO E. O Lord 
'Increase my faith (Loosemore). 
Responses (BynIL Faux Bourdons 
‘(Whitlock). And I saw a new heaven 
(Sainton). 

'ELY CATHEDRAL 8.1SHC IOJO 
sung Euch. Mlssa O quam glorfosum 
ivinorla). The Lord gave the word 


(Handel), Prelude and Fugue In G 
minor (Buxtehude). Canon Bone; 3.45 
E. Purcell in G minor. Thy word Is a 
lantern (Purcell). Offertoire sur les 
grands Jeux (Couperin). 

ST ASAPH CATHEDRAL Oywd: 11 
choral Euch. Mlssa Brevis (Berkeley). 
A spotless rose (Motet), Fantasia in P 
minor (Mozart). Rev Gtyn Price: 3 JO 
Choral E. The Second Service 
(Gibbons). Responses (Rose). There 
shall be signs In the sun (Wadefy). 

ST GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL South- 
wark: 8, |0 LM: It JO HM. Steepen 
Awake (Bach). Re m ember, remember 
not our offences (PoicelQ. ft Derm or 
Dunne. 

LEICESTER CATHEDRALS HC; 9A5 
M; IQJQ Euch. setting (Darke in E). 
Teach me O lord (Atrwood). The 
Provost: 4 Choral E. Setting (Ireland in 
Q. Thou wilt keep him (Wesley). 
LINCOLN CATHEDRAL 930 Song 
Euch, collegium Regale (Harolds), o 
sacrum convivlam (GabrieU); 1 1 .IS 
M. How beautUbl upon the 
mountains IS tanner): 3.45 E. Lord let 
me knoe mine end (Greene). Canon 
John Warwick. 

MANCHESTER CATHEDRAL' 845 
MP; 9 HC IOJO Sung Euch. Mass 
(Stravinsky). Lord let me know mine 
end (Greene). The Archdeacon: 6 JO E. 
walmlsley in D minor, we wait for 
thy loving kindness. Rev Bill TwtdeU. 
ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL' 8 HC IOJO 
M. Te Denm and Juhllatei (Tomkins). 
Rev Michael Sawatd; 1 1 JO HC 
Sumskrn In F, Prevent us O. Lord 
(Byrd); 3.15 E. Canddes {Nicholson in 
D flat). 1 saw the Lord iStalner). Rev Dr 
Jonathan Trigg. 

ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL Dundee 8 
HC 9.40 Sung C 1 1 ChonJ Eudu This 
Is the record (Gibbons). The Provost 
6J0 Choral E. The Short Service 
(Gibbons). The Provost 
ROCHESTER CATHEDRAL 8 HC 
9-45 M. Responses (Ferial), Benedlche 


(Ferguson in Q, Teach me O Lord 
(Attwood); IOJO Sung Euch. Teach me 
o Lord (Attwood). Fugue on the 
Magnificat (Bach). Chnon Edward 
Turner; 3.15 E.The K1 notion of God is 
dose at hand (Ferguson), Morley Hist 
service. Thy Word Is a lantern (Purcell). 
Prelude (Duralle); 6 JO Gonflnnadon. 
Rev Ambrose Weekes. 

SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL 9 HC 1 1 
Euch. Jdesse soiennelle (Vie me). 
People, look east (Brim m a). 
Remember, o thou man (Ravenscrofo. 

Canon Roy White 3 E. Setting 
packson In G), Hear mV prayer 
(Mendelssohn), canon David Palmer. 
WELLS CATHEDRAL 8 HC9.45 Sung 
Euch. call to remembrance (Farrann 
Darte in E). Rev P de N Lucas; 1 1 JO M. 
Benedlche (Dyson In F). Benedkrus 
(Harwood in A 0 ad. Ecce saoerdos 
magnus (Victoria}: 3 E. The wilderness 
(Wesley). Preb P J Riley; 6 wells 
Cathedral School Carol sendee. 
WESTMINSTER ABBEY: 8 HC 10 M. 
Benedlcnis (Byrd). Rev Richard 
wheeler; li S Euch. Rev Philip 
Chester 11.15 Abbey Euch. Mlssa 
Bel’Amfloli altera (LasuS). O tasie and 
see (Vaughan Williams), O sacrum 
convivium (Tallis). Rev Paul Ferguson; 


THE CHAPEL ROYAL SL JtmerS 


Palace: 8 HC 11.15 Sung Each. 
Jackson In G. The Ven P Ashford. 


QDEEVS CHAPEL OF THE SAVOY. 
WC2: 1 1 S Each. Short Sendee (tend}, 
Asurna Chrtsd Munera (Palestrina). 


Colin Semper. 

WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL 7. 8. 9. 
12. 5 JO. 7 M; 10 MP. IOJO Solemn 
Mass. The Malcolm Sargent Festival 
Choir; 2 JO Organ Redial. Iris 
SeboUhom: 3 JO Solemn v«B- 
YORK MINSTER: 8. 8A5 HC 10 S 
Euch. Thee we adore (Pialnsong). 
Mlssa ad lmhationem paier Nosier 


(Hanoi), very Rev John Southgate: 
II JO M. Responses (Smith), nux 
bourdon (Moore): 4 E. PurceU In G 
minor. Lord thou hast been our reftige 
(Vaughan Williams). Canon Ralph 
Maynard. 


Rev Richard Harries 
ROYAL NAVAL COLLEGE CHAPEL 
Greenwich. SEKfc 1 1 s Euch. Turn 
Thee again (Attwood). Lead me Lord 
(Wesley), The Chtplaln. 

GUARDS chapel Wellington 
Barracks. Swi: 1 1 HC Carol of the 
Advent (French Tung. Mass In four 
parts (Byrd). Lord we beseem thee 
(Barren). Band of the Irish Guards. Rev 
KR Joyce. 

CHAPEL ROYAL Hampton Court 
Palace: it M. Ireland on F. Teach me 
O Lord (Attwood); 3 JO Choral Each A 
connraudon, statbam in D, Let all 
mortal flesh keep silence (Balntow). Rt 
Rev A Hon Dr David Hope. 

ALL SAINTS. Margaret Sum. wi: 8, 
5.1 s LM. 1 1 HM. Mlssa Aerernaairlsd 
Munera (Palestrina), Teach me Thy 
Way (Hooper). Rev pa Crowe ft EAB, 
The short Service. Caustum. Rejoice In 
the lord (Anon). Rev c A Jones. 
all SOULS, Langham Place, wi : 1 1 
Rev Stephen wookey. 6 Rev Simon 
Parke. 

GROSVENOR CHAPEL South AutOey 
Street WI : 1 1 S Bach. Canon Roger 
Greenaoe. Mlssa Brevis (Patterson), a 
spotless rose (Howells). 

ST BARTHOLOMEW THE GREAT. 
Smith field. EC1: 9 HC 11 Choral 
Euch. Mlssa 

ST BRIDE'S. Fleer SneeL EC4: II 
Choral M A Euch. Respo nse s (Smith). 
Bcnedldre (Sumskro in B flat), Messe 
basse (Faure). There is no rose 
(Jouben). Handel's Messiah. Pan i. 
Fantasia In E flat (Sain t-Sates). canon 
Anthony Harvey. 

ST CLEMENT DANES (RAF Church) 
WC2: 1 1 Choral Such. Mass tor five 


voices (Byrd). Lord we beseech thee 
(Batten). 

ST GEORGE'S. Hanover Square. Wi: 
8J0 HC II S Euch. Mlssa brevis 
(Victoria), o Lord die Maker of all 
things (Mnndy). The Rector. 

ST JAMES'S. Garitckhytbe. BC4: IOJO 
Sung Euch. Rev John Paul 
ST JAMES’S. Sonet Gardens. Wl: 8 
HC IOJO Sung Each. Mlssa Aetema 
Chrisdnl (Patetrina). Every valley 
(Handel). Rev Bvbt Galloway; ft Choral 
E, Dorian Mode (Tallis}. Rejoice In the 
Lord (Anon). Rev G Buckle. 

ST LUKE'S. Chelsea. 5W3:8. 12.15 HC 
IOJO Sung Each. Messe cum JaMlo 
(Dunifle), Horanna to the son of 
David (Gibbons). Fantasy on 'Lo He 
conies' (Leighton}. Rev D Watson: 6 JO 
E. A spotless rose. Rev D Watson 
ST MARK'S. Regents Farit Rd. nwi : 8 
HC 1 0 Family C 1 1 Sung Each. Short 
Service (Batten), Call to remembrance 
(Famm), Rev Joanna Tates: 

ST MARGARETS. Westminster. SWI: 
II sung Euch. Messe Basse (Faure). 
Far shining names (Nicholson). O 
thou foe central orb (Gibbons). Rev 
Philip Chester. 

ST MAR3TN4N-THE-FIELDS. WCZ: 
9.45 Eucharist. The safari Martin -s 
Service (Stringer). Rejoice In the lord 


Choral Euch. Setting (Wtildock In GL 
Here O my lord. 1 see Thee (Whitlock). 
ST PAUL'S. Wilton Place. SWI: 8.9 HC 
li solemn euch. Mlssa . "Stage 
Propers" (Lassus), CBndque de Jean 
Ralne(Faure). Echo Carol (Wllhy), Rev 
Henry Ruschmqrer. 

STFETETS. Eaton Square. SW]: 8.15 
HC to Family Euch: U- Sung Euch. 
Mlssa Canute (Sheppard); Rev Fr 
Desmond Tillyer 

ST COLUMBA’S CHURCH OF 
SCOTLAND. Pont Street. SWI: 11. Rev 
Eleanor McMahon; 6J0 Rev John 
Mctadoe. 

CROWN COURT (StURCH OF 
SCOTLAND. Oovenr Garden. WCZ: 

I i .IS. 6 JO HC. Rev Stanley Wood. 
THE ASSUMPTION. Warwick Street, 
wi: M Mlssa brevis (CasalO. Hosanna 
OUo David (SicalQ. Nos qtd samus In 
hoc mundo (Lassus). 

FARM STREET. Wl: 7J0. 8Ja 10. 
IZ.IS. 4.15. 6.1S IM: II Solemn M. 
Mlssa In honorem (PeeterS.Avc Maria 
(vinoria). Ma grdllcit (»*fai| 

THE ORATORS. Brompfam Road. 
SWT. 7.8.9, ia 11 Mass. MissaSextl 
Toni (Croori, Aspidens a loege 
(Handl). 12 Ja 4 30. 7; 3 JO V A B. 
Dixit Marla (Hassle^. 

ST ETHELOREDA'S. Etf Place: 11. 
Mlssa Rotate coell (Hayun). Salvator 
mundl (Blow). ' ~\- m . 

ST ANNE AND ST AGNES (Urihenut). 
Gresham SL ECL 11 Choral HC Rev 
Wayne Swanson; 7 Choral M. Mass for 
five voice (Johannes EccanQ. nmm 
John Kaaiburton. 

WESLETS CHAPEL CMy Road. EG: 

II HC Rev Dr Oordon Banin; Rev 
Paul Holme. 

WESTMINSTER CENTRAL HALL 
(Methodist). SWI: 11. 6JC IDAS LBC 
Christmas Service Refolding; 6 JO 
Advent Carols. Rev Dr John Tudor. 


»1wht istrineei), Avt verom corpus 
(Byrd); 1 1 JO Visitors sendee. Jubilate 
Collegium Regale (Howells). Ave 
Maria (Palestrina); 6 JO ES- 
ST MARirs, Bourne Street, swi: 9. 
9.45. 7 LM; 1 1 HM. Mom -Le bien 
que far (GoudlmeO. I was glad 
(PurceU); Jerusalem surge (Isaac). Fr 
B01 Sooth 6 Solemn E A 8. 

ST MARYIEBONE. Mtiylehoae Road. 
Wl: 8 HC 1 1 Choral Each, Mass for 
Hour voices (Byrd). They wort Is a 
lantern (Purcdft. Rev Christine Owen; 
6J0 Ministry of Healing, Rev Barry 
Nevuun. 

BT MICHAEL'S. COmhta. EG: II 


MriT-Hoadun 
and Mm BS. Scblesmgcr 
T he engagement is announced 
between Junan. son of Mr Kelvin 
and die late Mrs Kay Houdiin. of 
Connecticut; USA. and Emma, 
daughter of Mr Roger Sditesinger 
and Mis Christopher Ryder, both 
of London. 


Marriage 

Lieutenant CoioneJ J.CF. 
MacCarthyMorrogfa 
sod Mra Xk.E. Jameson Ndson 
The marriage took place an Mot^ 
day. November 9, 1992. in BaiF 
gor, Co Down, of Lieutenant 
Colonel J.C.P. MacCarthy 
Morrogh (Seumas), of Inis Beg. 
Baltimore, Co Cork, and Joyce 
K.E. Jameson Nelson, formerly of 
Bene terry. Carkjw. 


, t • J_ j.' 

I, , f • 


— f 

■ 'J ’ C - 




Anniversaries 


Today 

BIRTHS: Robert Harley, Ead of 
Oxford, statesman. London. 1661: 
Martin van Buren. 8th American 
President 1837-41. Kindofaook. 
New Yortc. 1782: Christina Ros- 
setti. poet. London, 1830; John 
Rushworth Jeflicoe, 1st Ead Jdli- 
ooe. admiral of the fleet. 
Southampton. 1859; Fritz Lang, 
film director, Vienna. 1890; Walt 
Disney, cartoonist and film pro- 
ducer. Chicago. 1901; Emeric 
Pressbuiger, mm producer. Hun- 
gary. 1902; Otto Preminger, film 
director. Vienna. 1906. 


with a cargo of alcohol 1872. 
Prohibition was repealed in Amer- 
ica, 1933. 


BIRTHS: King Henry VI. reigned 
1422-61 and J470-71. Windsor. 
1421; Elizabeth Carter, poet Deal. 
1717; Sir Osbert SitwdL writer. 
London. 1892; Ira Gershwin, 
composer. New York. 1896. 


DEATHS: Sir Heniy Wotron. 
diplomat and poet Eton. 1639: 
Sieur de la Verendtye. explorer in 
Canada, Montreal 1749; Wolf- 
gang Amadeus -Mozart^ Vienna. 
1791; Alexandre Dumas pin, 
novelist Puys, France. 1870; Sir 
Heniy Tate, founder of the Tate 
Gallery. London. 1899; Claude 
Monet painter, Givemey. France. 
1926; Vacbd Lindsay, poet 
Springfield, Illinois, 1931. 

The Marie Celeste was found 
aba ndone d, drifting in the Atlantic 


DEATHS: Jean Baptiste Chardin, 
painter. Paris, 17 79; Joseph Black, 
chemist Edinburgh. 1799; An- 
thony Trollope. novelist. London. 
1882; Jean Blanc, socialist and 
historian, Cannes; 1882; Jefferson 
Davis. President of the Confed- 
erate Slates in die American Civil 
War 1861-65. New Odeans; 
1889; Ernst Werner von Siemens, 
engineer, Berlin. 1892. 

Today is die feast d^y of St 
Nicholas, patron saint of youth, 
popularly known as Santa Claus. 
Christopher Cohimbus discovered 
Hispaniola, now Haiti and the 
Dominican Republic. 1492. 

The Irish Free State was pro- 
dafared. 1922. .» 


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loose like calves released 
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Maiachl a : 2 


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COURAGE - On December 
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■ Australia, to Jo and Jeremy, 
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Special thanks hi Doctors ■"**”“*" 

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IBE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


15 


t,- Obituaries 


i, 


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S- 




ARTHUR STEPHENSON 


A rthnr Stephenson, prolific 
trainer of winning steeplechasers 
and hurdlers in die north of 
England, died in Bishop 
Auckland on December 3, aged 
72. He was bom on April 7, 1920. 


^ distinguished career spanning 
33 years, Arthur Stephenson's most 
important individual success was at 
Cheltenham in 1987 when The 
Thinker captured the Gold Cup. It was 
also a victory charged with high 
drama. 

Before the scheduled start of the 
cuniax. to the three-day jumping 
festival snow began to fall heavity. It 
looked odds-on dial racing would be 
called off. But the stewards decided to 
postpone the start in the hope that 
conditions would improve for a highly 
competitive 5 eld which included the 
1985 winner. Forgive ’N Forget, tire 
previous season's Grand National 
victor. West Tip. and that favourite of 
the crowds. Wayward Tad, successful 
three times in the King George VI 
Chase. 

Their optimism was miraculously 
justified as late as 4.50pm, but as the 
runners made their way to the start not 
only was lighting up time rapidly 
approaching, there was also further 
snow in the air. Finally, to the relief of 
the crowd, the runners were des- 
patched and the resulting Gold Cup 
can seldom have more resembled a 
procession of ghosts. 

In the murk on the far side, however, 
under the shadow of Cleeve Hill by 
then giving a passable imitation of the 
Matterhorn, one set of colours drew 
nearer and nearer the front It was the 
orange and green of The Thinker, a 
true beacon in the gloom. But al- 
though in the final stages, the race was 
not over yet First a blunder and then a 
bump all but put paid to what proved a 
thrilling triumph by a length and a 
half for die horse schooled by the 
trainer from Bishop Auckland. 



William Arthur Stephenson came of 
forming stock and was a cousin of the 
successful Royston trainer, the late 
“Willie” Stephenson, like his relative, 
he had a natural understanding of and 
skill with horses. He first rode a point 
to point winner at the age of 14 and 
two years later achieved his first riding 
success under Rules. Altogether he 
rode more than a hundred winners, 
combining the activity with forming 
the family lands in Co. Durham. 


Although he held a permit to train he 
did not take out a full licence until 
relatively late in life, when he was 39. 


Stephenson quickly built up a sub- 
stantial string of winne 


[winners, among them 
Kinmont Wullie, winner of the 1961 
Scottish Grand National (a race he 
won again with KHIone Abbey exactly 
30 years later) and Rainbow Battle, 
who captured the Welsh Grand Nat- 
ional in 1 964. 

Despite these victories, the Grand 


National itself consistently eluded him. 
although he had a succession of placed 
horses including O'Malley Point, 
Hawa's Song, and The Thinker him- 
self (all third). He came nearest with 
Durham Edition, twice runner-up. 
and beaten only three quartets of a 
length after a great tussle with Mr 
Frisk in 1990. 

Other Ain tree events, nevertheless. 
Stephenson won in profusion, includ- 
ing the Liverpool Fox Hunter's Chase 
four times (twice each with Credit Call 
and Sea Knight); the Topham Trophy 
with Rigton Prince, and. when this 
race was renamed the John Hughes 
Memorial Chase, with Vfllierstown. At 
Cheltenham, meanwhile, he had a 
Mackeson Gold Cup winner in Pawn- 
broker. and sent out Credit Call to win 
the Foxhunter’s Chase there as welL 
Stephenson also believed in quantity; 
he saddled that gallant old performer 
Supermaster to win on no fewer than 
34 occasions. 

Victory in numbers was perhaps 
Stephenson's very own hallmark, in 
1 969-70 he became the first National 
Hunt trainer to achieve 100 winners in 
a season: a feat he performed many 
times over, and most recently in 1991- 
92 with a total of 101. 

Although best known for his prolific 
success with jumpers, Stephenson also 
had important winners on the Flat, 
first with Forlorn River in the 
Nunthorpe Stakes, the July Cup and 
Challenge Stakes in 1967. then with 
Forlorn River's offspring Rapid River 
in tiie Gimcrack and other important 
two-year-old races five seasons later. 

As a personality, the ample-framed 
Stephenson cultivated a reticence with 
the Press which made him not the 
easiest trainer to approach for informa- 
tion. But there is no doubting that he 
had a baric rather than a bite, and was 
an affable enough man to those whom 
he knew he could trust He leaves a 
widow. Nancy, a son and two 
daughters. 


JOHN PAGE-PHILLIPS 


John Page-Phillips, 
president of the 
Monumental Brass 
Society, a fellow of be 
Society of Antiquaries of 
London and a well known 
antique dealer, died at his 
home at St Peter’s HaH, 
Suffolk, on November 14 
aged 62. He was born on 
June 17. 1930. 


JOHN Page-Phillips's great 
interest lay in the study of 
church monuments, most es- 
pecially monumental brasses. 
He was a notable writer on the 
subject not onty publishing 
articles but a widely selling 
general study Macklin's Mon- 
umental Brasses, 1 969. and a 
two-volume treatise Palimp- 
sests — The Backs of Monu- 
mental Brasses, 1980, which 
is a standard work of reference 
on re-used brasses, and the 
wealth of new material that 


has been discovered in exam- 
ining the reverses of memorial 
brass plates. His systematic 
analysis has enabled the link- 
age of many re-used pieces, 
now widely dispersed, a num- 
ber of which have been traced 
to London and other churches 
in England and, most interest- 
ingly, to others in the Low 
Countries. Some of his less 
known work, such as his 
unpublished thesis A Six- 
teenth Century Workshop. 
1 958. proved of great value to 
others studying the develop- 
ment of brasses and style and. 
as a consequence, the revision 
of many long accepted dates. 

His influence as a writer was 
nevertheless exceeded by his 
impact as a generator of 
interest and research. His 
home in London became a 
regular meeting place for anti- 
quaries and the notable ad- 
vances in knowledge of the 



1970s and 1980s owe much 
to his interest, curiosity and 
energy. 

Page-Phillips was educated 
at Eton and Magdalen Coll- 
ege, Cambridge. Following a 
brief period working for ICI 


he devoted his life to antique 
dealing and the study of 
church monuments. He estab- 
lished the business of Phillips 
and Page in Kensington 
Church Street. London, and 
made wide-ranging contacts 
in tiie antique trade. He had a 
particular interest in unusual 
objects from unusual sources, 
specialising, for instance, in 
Ethiopian and Burmese 
antiques. 

As president of the Monu- 
mental Brass Society he pio- 
neered many projects 
concentrating on the centena- 
ry of the society in 1987. 
Particularly notable were the 
“Witness in Brass Exhibition" 
at the Victoria and Albert 
Museum, the consolidated re- 
production of the society’s 
Portfolio plates and his role in 
the production of the book The 
Earliest English Brasses. 

In collaboration with Mich- 


ael Ward, Page-Phillips was 
an innovator in the manufac- 
ture of resin replicas of brasses 
and, for a period, ran a brass 
robbing centre. He set very 
high standards of quality, and 
a major reproduction, that of 
Sir Hugh Hastings (died 
1347), at Elsing, Norfolk, 
with restoration of many parts 
now lost, was included in the 


Age of Chivalry Exhibition at 
, Acade 


the Royal Academy. 

His last project, a confer- 
ence in Bruges earlier this 
year, proved a notable exam- 
ple of Anglo/ Flemish 
collaboration. 

Page-Phillips will be missed 
for his tremendous energy, his 
interest in the initiatives of 
others, and his concern that 
the study of memorials should 
take its proper place in the 
context of medieval art as a 
whole. He leaves a widow, 
Barbara, and six children. 


NUREDDIN ATASSI 


Mnreddm Atassi 
president of Syria. 1966- 
70. died in Paris on 
December 3 aged 63. He 
was born in Homs in 
1929. 


NUREDDIN Atassi came to 
power in Syria as a result of a 
bloody coup— the 20th in less 
than 20 years — in 1966 and 
four years later was over- 
thrown and imprisoned for 22 
years by his former ally. Lieut- 
Gen Hafiz al-Assad, who re- 
mains in power in Damascus. 
President Assad held Atassi 
responsible for Syria’s humili- 
ating defeat in the Six-Day 
War against Israel in 1967, 
when Syria lost control of the 
Golan Heights. 

During his political career 
Atassi had established himself 
within the pan-Arab Baathist 
party as a doctrinaire Marxist 
with extremist tendencies. 
With the party divided be- 
tween two factions. Atassi was 
a leader of the “progressive” 
element, strongly supported 
by Moscow, which believed 
that the creation of a powerful 
one-party state took prece- 
dence over the requirements of 
Arab unity and tiie need for a 
militant stance against Israel 
The opposing “nationalist” 
faction, led by General Assad, 
favoured a more pragmatic 
approach to internal affairs, 
improved relations with Syr- 
ia's Arab neighbours and foil 
participation in the campaign 
against Israel. 

Atassi took a degree in 
medicine at the University of 
Damascus. He then estab- 
lished a practice there and 
entered politics, quickly be- 
coming a leading member of 
the Baath (Resurrection) par- 
ty. After the party achieved 
power in a 1 963 coup d *ftat 
he was appointed minister of 
tiie interior. He retained this 
portfolio in spite of a cabinet 
reshuffle until May the follow- 
ing year. Then, under a new 
constitution which was pro- 



mulgated. he became a mem- 
ber of the presidential council 
and. in September 1 965. was 
appointed its vice-chairman. 

However, in February 1 966 
there was another military 
coup, in which 41 people were 
officially listed as killed and 69 
injured, and the regime of 
Brigadier Amin Hafiz was 
overthrown. Atassi emerged as 
head of state and Gen Assad 
as minis ter of defence. Atassi 
was, initially at least regarded 
as little more than a front-man 
for tiie regime. His achieve- 
ment in remaining in office 
for the next four years defied 
most predictions and was the 
result, primarily, of tire failure 
of his numerous opponents, 
who inducted Haifiz al-Assad. 
to join forces. 

As head of state. Atassi, 
relied heavily on support from 
Moscow while espousing the 
B aathis t regime’s extremist 
foreign polity. 

Eight months after he took 
office in 1966, tension along 
Syria’s border with Israel in- 
creased and was to become 
one of tire dements that led to 
the war beginning on June 5. 
1967. In tiie fighting, in spite 
of some stubborn insistence, 
the Syrian forces were out- 
flanked and overrun and tire 
Israelis advanced rapidly to 
the town of Qtmeitnt, 40 miles 


from Damascus. On June 10 
Syria and Israel formally ac- 
cepted tire United Nations 
proposal for a cease-fire but 
AtassTs regime rejected all 
idea of a c om p ro m ise with 
Israel and, alone among tire 
Arab states, maintained its 
commitment to a reunified 
Palestine. Atassi attacked -the 
more conservative Arab lead- 
ers, accusing them of being in 
league with foreign ardes and 
showed no compunction in 
reqpening earlier inter-Arab 
feuds, kerning Syria at logger- 
heads with Iraq and Jordan 
and estranged from Egypt. 

Meanwhile the feud within 
tire Baath Party in Syria 
continued. By 1968, the “na- 
tionalist” faction was strong 
enough to gain several more 
cabinet seats. In 1969 Gen 
Assad attempted to take over 
tire govennent but was fore- 
stalled by Soviet threats that if 
he did so all military and 
economic supplies would end. 
A year later, however, tiie 
factional dispute readied its 
dimax when King Husain of 
Jordan acted against the Pal- 
estinian guerrillas in his coun- 
try who were threatening his 
authority. Over the objections 
of General Assad, Atassi lent 
the Syrian Army's support to 
the Palestinian guerrillas, 
sending an armoured column 
to their aid. General Assad 
refused to proride the column 
with air cover and they suf- 
fered a humiliating defeat As 
a consequence, in November, 
while Atassi was in hospital 
General Assad seized power. 
Atassi was placed under house 
arrest and later transferred to 
the al-Mezze military prison in 
Damascus where he was held, 
without being charged or put 
on trial until April this year. 
After suffering a heart attack 
he was moved to Tishrin 
Military Hospital and, when 
his condition worsened, the 
Damascus government 
allowed him to be moved, in 
November, to Paris. 


PROFESSOR NORMAN DEES 


Professor Norman Dees, 
director of extra-mural 
studies at the University of 
Glasgow, 1961-81, died 
on November 1 1 aged 76. 
He was bam on April 7, 
1916. 


career fay the experience of 


IT WAS peculiarly appropri- 
ate that Norman Dees should 
die on Remembrance Day. 
His service in the Durham 
light Infantry and his capture 
in the North Africa Campaign 
in the second world war were 
powerful influences on his 
thinking about international 
politics and social develop- 
ment, and he was set on his 


prisoners of war. 

A graduate of Manchester 
University. Norman Dees 
worked with tire Manchester 
Extra-Mural Department as 
warden of Holly Rpyde resi- 
dential adult centre for a year. 
In 1947 he joined King's 
College, Durham (later part of 
Newcastle Univezsity), as resi- 
dent tutor for Cumberland 
and Westmorland, based in 
Penrith. 

Later he became deputy 
director of extra-mural studies 
at Newcastle, and for his last 
twenty years of working life 


was director of extra-mural 
studies at Glasgow. 

Dees (Hided himself on 
teaching without a note. He 
pioneered a number of adult 
education programmes, such 
as an access programme for 
mature students in 1979 (the 
first in Scotland), trade union 
studies and training for tiie 
juvenile justice system. 

He became interested in the 
teaching of Adult Education 
as an academic discipline and 
published two books in the 
field. 

Norman Dees is survived 
by his second wife, Phyllis, 
and two daughters. 


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Ptereeiadu dcm«flon r re« 1 »uaip.»» BT j Bnllm . 1T f f i.Kw«ifnf 
lacpanfosaatceraoJora parent your address with daytime 
and borne telephone man ben (if ddfeoo). 



Homthfi help! distressed people of 
j II ttges. Please send a Jeaatton 
to: Hone life. FHEBPOST, Umdoa 
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asore mfbrmauaa. 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 


BRmSHfSACTFDUIBlXnON 
THE HEART RESEABCfl CHAISTY 


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14 Htzbairftaga S&aaL 
Laata W1U40H 


Thank you from 

theRNLI 


It is 1 

oontnboiiQss that aBows i 

costs of £ 1 C 


with the boats and 
equipment they seed, 
for fid i 


The Director, Dept 

DT, Royal National 
Lifeboat Institution, 
West Quay Road, 
Poole, Dorset BH15 
1HZ, or phone 
(0202)671133. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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( ill! PR! \ HAiM'V 
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it fft i t ing nd moniuif bigfc 
mad inf i ifl cWdra’i soviocs, 
b m e fi tiag ddUrea aO over (he 
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By rcntwiiuiag as ia yoarniD, 
yoa esa bdp as da so ndi reore. 

Castur Kirs Eagbad oa 871 - 
1789441 far rsftaajsnon. 


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ANNOUNCEMENTS 


DIALYSIS AM) 
TRANSPLANTATION 

THEIR ONLY HOPE 



rewia hrepmi w piwi 
lor acres at ream Me year. 
D uiafl bn a K 
[T tfc — mn macY 


How near 
a#") we are to 
^ the cure,,. 
...depends on you. 


LEUKAEMU1 


■ wura uj m-«G aui 


RUSSIA IN EUROPE ON THIS DAY 


The Russians have now been in eastern 
Europe for over four years. The Red 
Array still stands where it stopped in 
1 945 in eastern Germany and Austria, 
in Poland, Hungaty, and Rumania; 
along the Danube and the Elbe. Taking 
advantage of this historic opportunity 
the Soviet Government has imposed 
upon all the countries of eastern Europe 
except Finland a profound and rigid 
revolution which is still continuing and 
is dearly designed to make them wholly 
subservient to, and almost inseparable 
from, the Soviet Union itself. Indeed the 
question arises, more insistently than 
before, whether it is not the ultimate 
intention of the Soviet rulers to incorpo- 
rate them bodily within foe Union, as 
they incorporated the three Baltic 
Republics. 


December 5 1949 


Extracts fmm the days leading article 
indicate the depth of mistrust felt over Soviet 
plans in Europe, less than five years after the 

end qf the war. 


To some extent the Soviet Govern- 
ment is itself the victim of its own policy. 
Fear of the western Powers, foe dreadful 
logic of Stalinism, the crudity of Russian 
methods and the nagging suspicions 


which afflict all tyrants may have driven 
the Soviet leaders farther than they 
meant to go. 

The “example of the Soviet Union" 
must be followed in everything from tiie 
planning of industry to the laying of 
brides. Railway engines driven in a 
Soviet manner run faster and arrive at 
their destinations hours before they are 
due. Adulation of Statin has reacted a 
point where it must surely sicken the 
most ardent supporter, and it is difficult 
to believe that factory workers in 


Rumania are really ovejjoyed when they 
find that they have to increase produc- 
tion by 1 0 per cent as a birthday present 

to the “great genius, our teacher, 
uberator and well-tried friend of the 
Rumanian nation". 

Some of them, no doubt accept this 
position wfflmgty enough in the blind 
faith mat in the end a new society will 
have been created and another genera- 
tion wfli beabfe to reap what they have 
sown. How long tire Soviet Government 
vriti be able to enforce its win and exact 
obohmreunder these conditions must 
be a matter of specufation. but it would 
came to the 

Soffit Union could give it 
foe absolute security fo r whfcfa it 
In the meantime it is terrible to 
contemplate how many men and 
wmen must suffer for what is bound to 
remam an illusion. Whatever the end 
may be, it is already ^ 

four vmtc » f wa 


mark on the Continent of Europe. 


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3 


Summit “hit-list” 

The British presidency of the 
European Community will 
present the Edinburgh summit 
with a list of EC laws it says 
should be scrapped. It is the 
dearest attack yet on the Brus- 
sels' powers and throws light on 
the obscure subject of ‘'sub- 
sidiarity" Page 1 0 

Help for patients 

Patients will be entitled to 
prompt help with changing their 
doctor and a rapid response to 
complaints under new standards 
for general practitioner services 
announced yesterday Page 2 

Castle fire report 

The fixe that ravaged Windsor 
Castle two weeks ago was proba- 
bly caused by a spotlight acciden- 
tally overheating a curtain in the 
private chapeL The official re- 
port concludes that no individual 
was to blame . ......Pages 

Bomb injures 19 

Nineteen white people were hurt 
when a bomb exploded at a 
crowded fast-food cafe in 


Queenstown in the Eastern 
Cape. South Africa’s police chief 
said his men “will meet fire with 
fire" Page 8 

Aiiysa appeal fails 

Administrators will need no re- 
minding that sport is not above 
die law. But they may sleep more 
easily after the failure of die Aga 
Khan's appeal court challenge to 
the Jockey Chib's disqualifica- 
tion of his 1989 Oaks winner, 
Aiiysa — . Page 5 

Yeltsin condemned 

President Boris Yeltsin battled to 
save his reforms from the rav- 
ages of the conservative Con- 
gress of People’s deputies after 
the assembly strongly con- 
demned his government’s record 
and demanded fundamental 
policy changes. - Page 1 1 

Coalition delay 

A new Irish government may not 
be formed until after Christmas, 
said Bertie Ahem, who contin- 
ues as finance minister pending 
agreement on a coalition after 
last week's election Page 6 


Helping phobics unbutton their fears 


■ There is no fear so compelling as that of the unexplained, 
says Phobia Awareness week's organiser. One woman is so ter- 
rified of buttons she has had them replaced by Velcro on her 
clothes. A retired post office worker has a fear of bagpipes. "If I 
hear ‘Mull of Kin tyre’, I go to pieces,” she said Page 6 


THE TIMES CROSSWORD NO 19,094 


Name/Address. 


ACROSS 


1 Vessel supplied with scurvy pro- 
phylactic, that's great! (7). 


28 In die end. former member 
boards plane, perhaps (7). 


5 Slaver bringing back blackbird 
to the French (7). 

9 Soldiers cook in this pan of 
America (5). 

10 Appropriate children argue die 
toss (4,5). 

11 A hundred and fifty English 
scholars feast in February (9). 

12 Ancient letter, a survival from 
ogam, maybe (5). 

13 Unsteady, or firm and unyield- 
ing (5). 

15 The racing game? (9). 

18 One team entered in the race 
finally scratched, bewildered (9). 

19 Discard most of bark (5). 

21 Rope, see. has caught the animal 
(5). 

23 Insect bearing, ’tissaid, supreme 
happiness (9). 

25 Water-dock in dry places going 
wrong (9). 

26 Old man mostly responsible for 
faux pas (S). 

27 Fruit with an outer covering 
might be called bananas (7). 


DOWN 

1 Upset, hurried one's cocktail (7). 

2 Take part in two sports by aims 


2 Take part ui two sports by aims 
(3.3.3K 

3 “This is perfect,” thought the 
student (5). 

4 Site meant for redevelopment as 
a cafe (9). 

5 Nobles used to fight (5). 

6 Setting agent in sort of sailing 
ship (9). 

7 Slattern with a broom (5). 

8 Graceful poem unfinished by 

worker (7). 

14 Allow eyes to wander in the main 
(6.3). 

1 6 On one’s toes in broad-brimmed 
hat (4-5). 

17 Cut top off frill, causing a 
commotion (9). 

18 Bird oift orpiace? In place (7). 

20 Quiedy withdraw herald (7). 

22 Bouquet delivered to an audience 
(5). 

23 Move sprout up, say (5). 

24 Pig entered, switching places (5). 


Solution to Puzzle No 19,088 


Sotothm to Rnzfe No 19.093 


tnn nrnnnra 0000000 

0GJ00QBH0 

00000 000111100110 

dSBHHnHH 

mnciHSQcicna onnnn 
b a □ s s 
EDiicjn 1100000000 
0 0 0 0 0 0 
000000000 0GC300 
3 13 0 0 0 

nnnnn 000000000 

£30000000 
□□□000000 00000 
0000000 0 
0000000 00000001 


0S00DQ00B0 0000 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
□000Q000E0 0000 
00000000 
000000000000 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
H000DH00D £30000 
□ 0000000 
0HDQ0 300000000 
0 B 0 13 E3 □ 0 
000000000000 
00000000 
0000 0000000030 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
0000 0000030000 


THE TIMES TODAY 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 



Insurers battle over bombs cover 

■ In the face of the most sustained IRA campaign since the 
seventies, British insurers were trying last night to meld 
together a package to press the government into underwriting 
the costs of mainland bombings. 

The decision of large foreign reinsurers to cease offering 
cover from next year for claims arising from terrorism in the 
United Kingdom has panicked the industry. Downing Street 
officials says the government wants a commercial solution 
and is determined to resist the pressure Pages 1,2 

Prince backs French farmers 

■ The Prince of Wales ignoring both government and his 
compatriots by offering philosophical support to French 
farmers in Paris as he accepted a French honourPages 1,7, 1 0 



--V: - 


P akis tani soldiers of the UN humanitarian gro u p in Somalia awaiting the arrival of American troops at Mogadishu airport Pages 1, 9 


Weekend pick 

Terence Ratdgan virtually dis- 
owned After the Dance when the 
play was ill received by critics and 
public in 1 939, and it has appar- 
ently not been performed since. 
Stuart Burge’s production does full 
justice to a bleak and tragic 
piece Weekend, Pages 16,17 


1 ■ 1 v! ; ; 


HoBywood witchhunt David Rob- 
inson reopens the FBI file on Char- 
lie Chaplin, and exposes the untold 
story of J Edgar Hoover’s personal 
vendetta to bound into exile foe 

world’s top comedian Page 6 

Treasure chest Samantha Fox 
made millions from her five years 
as a Page Three girl. She talks to 
Sally Brampton about life after get- 
ting dressed Page 12 

Sheer magic See-through chiffon, 
deverfy arranged sequins... this 
season's party looks are artfully al- 
luring, Iain R Webb says Page 30 








Amstrad: Alan Sugar, founder of 
the Amstrad consumer electronics 
group, said plans to foe com- 
pany private could falter. Die suc- 
cess of his bid depends on foe 
number of shareholders at 

Thurday's meeting Page 17 

Markets: Sterling ended foe week 
nearly 9pf higher at DM2.4870 
amid slim signs of improved eco- 
nomic activity and as investors 
fought shy of currencies in the 
ERM Page 17 


Nob holds Bank Yukio Nina- 
gawa's production of-77re Tempest, 
now at foe Barbican, is played in 
Japanese and uses elements of Noh 
theatre in its staging. But Benedict 
Nightingale praises it as “doser to 
the heart of Shakespeare’s most 
forgiving play” than many an Eng- 
lish theatre company could 
manage Weekend, Page 14 

EMs tires: Cynthia Rose visits Ath- 
ens. Georgia, to discover that foe 
King is alive and well in foe work of 
artists he inspires, from a roadshow 
to carrier bags — Review Page 26 


Cricket England has put forward a 
E5 million bid for the 1995 Wodd 
Cup, but it may not be accepted by 
the International Cricket 

Council Piage 32 

Footbath Liverpool's hopes of 
bong reinstated in the European 
Cup Winners’ Cup were dashed 
when Fifa ruled that Mikhail 
Rusayev*s registration with Spartak 
Moscow was acceptable— Page 31 


Hot Ice: The American rapper. Ice 
Cube, has a new album out Anti- 
women, anti-gays, foul-mouthed: 
strange ingredients for success, yet 
The Predator has shot straight to 
the top of foe American pop chart 
Reviews of other new record rel- 
eases indude a big compilation of 
Louis Armstrong in his AD Stars 
prime, and discs of romantic orch- 
estral music Weekend. Page 14 


SIMON JENKINS 

The British government is being 
sucked into foree distant conflicts at 
foe behest of American (and some 
British) public opinion. It must 
resist Page 20 

ANNE McELVOY 

Set-piece power straggles are built 
into foe fabric of Russian hist- 
ory... Unlike foe revolutionaries of 
1917 however. Mr Yeltsin does not 
have the option of ruthlessly violent 
methods followed by administra- 
tive repression to ensure that his 
vision of Russia holds sway. Sudi is 
foe price of democracy — Page 20 

MATTHEW PARRIS 

Hal So it has come to this? My fury 
was aggravated fay foe knowledge 
that I have no mortgage with foe 
Bristol & West and am therefore 
denied the pleasure of marching 
down to the nearest branch to with- 
draw it and take my custom 
elsewhere Page 20 


PAPkTD fo A prize of a superb Parker Duqfold International 
Fountain Pen, with an 18 carat gold nib and fully 
DUOFOLD guaranteed for the lifetime of the original ownerwill 
— -= — i tr.-n-r j-rrr-t oe given for the first five correct solutions opened next 
Thursday. Entries should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday 
Crossword Competition. PO Box 486. Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published, next Saturday. 


For foe latest region by region fore- 
cast. 24 hows a day, dal 0891 500 
followed by foe app rop riate code. 



Greater London 

KertLSuroy .Sussex 

Dorset, Hants & K3W. 

Down & Cornwall „ 

Wats,GkMicBAvanjSorn8 - 

Berta .Bucks, Gxon 

Beds,Herts & Essex 

Norfolk. Suffofc£ambs 

West LW&Stfi Glam & Gwent 

Sfcropsjferefds & Wares 

Central kfidbnds. 

East Midlands 

Lines & Humberside 

Dyfed& 


roads. Morning showers, especially in western and southern 
districts, will die out by the afternoon. Some may be wintry, giving * 
a dusting of snow over hills . Eastern Scotland and England 
should stay diy with the best of any sunshine. By evening, rain will 
reach Northern Ireland, Wales and southwest England. Outlook: 
add and unsettled with showers or longer periods of rain. 


II ' 


=ltuxler d=rttaB; lb-fog: 

: a n^snow: f- Ur odoud; r= 



Amsfdm 

Athens 


Bangkok 

Baibads* 

Bsrcefcta 

Beirut 


18 61 I Makrtne 
23 73 s Man** 


29 84 t Wan 
29 M C Montreal* 


16 61 I Moscow 
18 84 f MuMi 


Bermuda* 

Biarritz 

Bonded 


Ch*cti u re h 

Cotegna 

S5 8 ® 1 

Corfu 

Dufaon 

Fwo 


For th e latest A A traffic and road- 
works Information, 24 hours a day, 
dial 0336 401 followed by the 
appropriate code. 


Frankfurt 

Fuichaf 

Geneva 


. a n =» snow; f— tain odout r=rafci 
C F OF 

16 81 C Luxor 19 86 a 

17 63 c Madrid 10 SO d 

19 68 t lUorca 18 64 a 

20 68 f Maga 17 63 f 

5 41 1 Mtta 22 72 a 

18 81 I Met) 'me 21 70 f 

23 73 S Mart* 24 75 S 

29 84 t Wan 9 46 f 

29 84 C Montreal* 4 39 I 

16 81 I Moscow -1 30 c 

18 84 r Mu**) 5 41 t 

11 52 f Naples 16 61 r 

7 45 S NOeW 21 70 9 

23 73 S NYcric* 7 45 C 

17 63 t Moe 12 54 r 

13 55 r Oak) 2 36 I 

4 39 r Puls 4 39 c 

B 48 s Peking 3 37 a 

28 62 6 Perth 28 82 a 

10 86 < Prague 6 43 1 

19 86 c Reutov* -1 30 c 

-1 30 c Rhodes 15 59 b 

IB 66 f Fflywfi 20 68 s 

J ST r Rome 17 83 b 

5 41 c Safetjug 7 45 c 

19 66 I S Frisco* 12 54 c 

4 39 a Sraaiago* 25 77 I 

17 83 1 S Patio' 23 73 c 

15 5B I Seoul 10 50 s 

4 39 r Sntfpor 25 77 r 

21 70 f Stmakn 5 41 d 

7 45 r SraebYg 0 48 c 


11 52 f Naples 
7 45 S NOeM 
23 73 S NYcric* 

17 63 t Ntoe 
13 55 r Oafa 

4 39 r Pais 

9 48 s Peking 
2B B2 B Perth 
19 88 1 Prague 

18 86 c BejMHvfc 
-1 30 c Rhotwa 

19 68 f Flyadh 
3 37 r Rome 

5 41 c Salzburg 


4 39 r Ski 

21 70 1 Sfl 
7 45 r Sr 
17 63 c Syr 
3 37 f Tar 

22 72 a Tel 


London ft SE traffic, roadworks 

C. London (within N&SOrcs.) 731 

M-waysftoadsM4-M1 732 

M-waya/roadsMI-OartfordT 733 

M-ways/roadsDartfardT-M23 734 

M-wrays/roads M23-M4 735 

M25 London Orbital only 736 

National traffic and ro e dwn rta 

National motorways 737 

West Country 738 

Wales 739 

Midlands 740 

East Anglia 741 

North-west England 742 

Norttveast England 743 

Scotland 744 

Northern Ireland 745 


3 37. I Tenerife 
10 50 a Tokyo 


26 79 e Toronto* 
30 86 a Tunis 


LPttns 

LeTquet 

Lisbon 

Locarno 

London 

LAngeh* 


31 88 a Vafencfe 
22 72 c VancVer* 


5 41 I Venice 
16 61 e Vienna 

7 45 c Wan* 

6 43 1 WashTor 
16 8i f Wurman 


4 36 r Zurich 


flgunss are latest erasable 


23 73 c 
10 50 a 
26 77 r 
5 41 d 
9 48 c 
19 68 r 

17 S3 c 
14 57 c 

21 70 s 
14 57 s 

0 32 c 

22 72 e 

18 64 1 

1 34 8 
12 54 s 
10 50 s 

7 45 r 
7 45 I 
22 72 f 
3 37 t 


minute (cheap rate) 
at aH other tones. 


48p per minute 




The winners of last Saturday's 
competition are: T D Spencer, 
Inverness Street . West Drumcyne , 
Govan. Glasgow. D Bedford, 
Rocks Park Road. Uckfield, East 
Sussex: B Adams, Rectory Green, 
Beckenham. Kent : S J Shurety, 
Settrington Road, London ; G E 
Fitchew, Rosendale Road , London. 


TODAY • 

□ 


SunriKHE Sunsets 
7-50 am 333 pn 


Moan rises Moon sets 

1X17 pm 248am 


Londo n 333 pm to 7.52 am 
Bristol 4.03 pm to 8.01 cm 
Edinburgh &40 pm to 8.29 am 
MancfiesSa-3-51 pmto8.11 am 
Barranca 421 pm to 807 am 


tomorrow 



□ 


Sundaes Sweets 

7.51am 353 pm 


Maonrisn Moon sets 
130pm £42 am 



Bs* 

Bank 


Buya 

Sate 

AusbafaS _ 

236 

216 

Austria Seri 

iaj» 

1700 

BeJgkmFr 

5235 

4605 : 

Cenadai - 

2.125 

1865 1 

Denmark Kr .. . 

1024 

S/44 

FWendMkk 

8L89 

789 

Francs Fr 

8J83 

023 

G«nnnyOm „ 
Greece Dr 

2j62 

34000 

242 

32000 

HongKongS^. 

1282 

1182 

JretendPl 

395 

815 

Italy Lira 

Japan Van 

229000 

21060 

213000 

19480 

Netherlands GW 

236 

273 

i NowrayKr „ 

10.77 

987 

Portugal Eac 

23230 

21480 

Soulh Africa Rd 

520 

480 

Spain Pta 

185.00 

17200 

&«wienKr 

1024 

1044 

SwifeerfendFr 

235 

217 

Turk^rLfca 

138000 

1.67 

128000 

184 



inlc notes orrfy 








AGAINST AGGRESSION 

Stowjy, quietly, and at loner levels 
in the chancelleries of Europe, 
there is growing worry ... in five 
years’ time, it is said, we may look 
bade to the winter ofl 992 and ask 
why Western governments refused 
to use the weapons they command 
to save Europe from a widening 
war ... The need for a tougher 
Western approach is daily spelled 
out in Balkan blood Page 21 


Sex and foe single tarkey: How 
one fanner is putting life into his 
birds — at least until Christmas 

comes Page 3 

Wines that travel weft Let your 
fingers do foe Christmas present 
walking by sending friends and 
relations bottles via the mafl-order 

System Pages 

Make a Christinas getaway: A gift- 
wrapped selection of seasonal 
breaks for aH. from Santa-free 
zones to supersonic sleigh- 
rides Pages 10,11 


Henry James: Caroline Moore ad- 
mires an excellent biography of the 
man who wrote Portrait of a Lady. 
TheAspem Papers and The Bost- 
onians Pages 52-53 

Dean Martin: Stripping away the 
Hollywood glitz, Nick Tosches’s 
Dino: Living High in the Dirty 
Business of Dreams shows how 
Martin has survived bankruptcy, 
addiction, only to withdraw into a 
twilight sedusion Page 54 


John Cummer's decision to quit 
the Church of England General 
Synod is subjected to our readers’ 
analysis Page 13 


I T g-uT 1 ' or. 

-i >' 4\‘- 


American troops are rightly being 
sent tostrifetom Somalia to insure 
that food reaches millions of starv- 
ing people. But instead of doing it 
right. President Bush seems bent 
on doing it quickly 

The Washington Post 


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WE'RE BIG H A/V (HOME CINBIIA) TOO! 


n m ti 


















F‘ 

IT- 



BUSINESS 17-26 

Profile: marketing 
supmme 



SPORT 27-32 

Eric Cantona adds 
Galjic spice to 
United's title bid 



RACING 28 

Aga Khan loses 
in the 

Court of Appeal 


WEEKEND 

SPORTING 

FIXTURES 

Page 27 



TIMES 



FRAUD WATCH 



Banks are bracing 
themselves for an 
increase in card fraud 
but are prepared to 
fight hard this year to 
keep losses down 
Page 21 

+ 

LOAN WATCH 

Banks should limit 
guarantees for loans 
made by parents, 
spouses or 
business partners 
Page 23 

♦ 

CASE WATCH 



Incompetent drafting 
allowed die Revenue to 
keep pursuing its case 
against die Malvern 
masters 

Letters, page 24 

* 

TIP WATCH 



The Inland Revenue 
has ways of controlling 
the black economy by 
estimating likely 
income from dps and 
other perks 
Page 22 


■'THE'Pgpli^p 


US dollar 

1.5600 (-0.0040) 

German mark 
2.4846 (+0.0135) 
Exchange index 
80.7 (+0.2) 

Bank of England official cto se (4pm) 


FT 30 share 

2082.4 (-9.3) 

FT-SE 100 

2759.4 (-11.6) 

New York Dow Jones 

3284.90 (+8.37)* 

Tokyo Nikkei Avge 

17295-69 (+35.61) 


London: Bank. Base: 7% 

3 -month tnlestiank: 7V7% 

3 -month etigbte bills: 6' 1 ir6V)6 
US: Prime Rale: 6% 

Federal Funds: IW 
3-monSi Treasury Bflts: s.29-3.27%* 
M'JB-IOIV 




London: 

E $15600 
E: DM2.4882 
£S*Fr22360 
E FFr8.4980 
E:Yfin194.85 

£- Index; 

ECU: £0.790671 
C. ECU1 564748 


NewYMc 

£: Si 5570* 

» DM15965" 

S: SwFrl .4335* 
$: FFrS.4225* 
£Yen12450* 

S: Index. 65 5 
SDR: £0.891471 
ESOR1.121741 


London Forex market dose 


London! 

AM $33590 Ffo $335.60 
$33550*335.90 
£215.10-215.00 
NewYorfc 

Come* $335^335.75* 


Bmnt (Dec) $l8.40/bW ($18-25) 


urges 
investors 
to cast votes 


By Colin Campbell 

ALAN Sugar, founder of 
Amstrad . last night said that 
his plan to take the computer 

K private was not a 
„ tne conclusion. 
Realisation of his ambition 
to buyout, at 30p a share, the 
65 per cent of Amstrad he 
does not own depends on the 
number of shareholders (in 
person or by proxy) voting at a 
critical shareholders’ meeting 
on Thursday. 

Every person and every 
share counts. Mr Sugar needs 
a simple majority of non- 
Sugar shareholders and 75 
per cent of non-Sugar votes to 
win the day. “If shareholders 
do not vote. . .then they will 
get no dash,” Mr Sugar said. 
Amstrad’s disclosure of 


■ Alan Sugar’s controversial plan to take 
Amstrad private is on a knife-edge. As the 
chairman says “If shareholders do not 
vote... then they will get no dosh” 


proxy numbers lodged with its 
registrars by the dose of 
business on Thursday show 
that the number of sharehold- 
ers wanting Mr Sugar's 3 Op 
offer, and the number of 
shares they represent, are 
short of the statutory require- 
ments. Amstrad has 31.469 
shareholders on its share reg- 
ister, but by Thursday only 
9,443 had voted. 

Mr Sugar said: ‘There are 
22.000 shareholders out there 
who have not voted, and who 
have assumed, wrongly, that 


Cautious optimism 
at Treasury adds 
to sterling appeal 

By Janet Bush, economics correspondent 


*P1: 139a October (1987-100) 
* Denatn midday trading price 


THE government delivered a 
cautiously upbeat message on 
the economy yesterday after a 
week when sterling enjoyed 
new-found favour with inves- 
tors disenchanted with the 
embattled currencies in the 
exchange-rate mechanism. 

Interviewed on BBC Radio. 
Stephen DorreU, financial sec- 
retary to the Treasury, said: “I 
think there is very dear evi- 
dence. not that there’s a full- 
blown recovery under way — 
we all know that’s not true — 
but that confidence is im- 
proving and ad the indepen- 
dent analysis now not only 
say. but axe backing their 
words with money, that they 
expect a gentle recovery to take 
root next year.” 

Such cautious opti mi sm was 
one element in sterling’s new 
popularity. The pound started 
the week at about DM2.40. 
rising rapidly to dose nearly 
nine pfennigs higher at 
DM2.4870 yesterday. 

A week of glimmers of 
renewed activity in the govern- 
ment’s economic statistics was 
rounded off by a 6 per cent rise 
in new car registrations in 
November against the same 
period last year, suggesting 
consumers are beginning to 
respond to lower interest rates 
and the abolition of car tax in 
the Autumn Statement 

Such straws in the wind 
triggered the return of inves- 
tors who had baited out of the 
pound after its exit from the 
ERM in September. Norman 
Lament, the Chancellor, told 
The Wall Street Journal that 
the pound had fallen far 
enough and any further de- 
clines would compromise Brit- 
ain's fight to control inflation. 

Of even more significance 


for die pound yesterday was 
die mark's vulnerability as 
evidence mounts of recession 
m Germany. Yesterday, the 
economics ministry an- 
nounced another fell in west 
German industrial orders, the 
eighth consecutive monthly 
dedine. 

The mark’s troubles took 
some pressure off the ERM. 
The franc recovered a little, 
helped by a joint statement 
after this week’s Franco-Ger- 
man summit that the ERM 
was "decisive for stability and 
prosperity''. The franc dosed 
at 3.3970 to the mark, having 
been above 3.4100 earlier in 
the week. 

Other British economic sta- 
tistics published yesterday of- 
fered slim grounds for 
optimism. There was a 2 per 
cent rise in the number of 
houses built in October com- 
pared with September but 
taking the last three months 
together, the number of hous- 
ing starts are still down per 
cent on last year. 

The government’s cyclical 
indicators for October were a 
mixed bag for these looking 
for dear signs of recovery. 
Although die longer leading 
index; which points to activity 
1 1 months ahead, rose 1.3 per 
cent, the shorter leading index 
— suggesting what might 
happen in four months — ML 
□ US unemployment fen to 
7.2 per cent in November 
from 7.4 per cent in October, 
providing more evidence a 
genuine recovery may now be 
under way. Non-farm payroll 
jobs rose 105.000 last month 
compared with a revised in- 
crease of 34, OCX) in October. 

Jobs gloom deepens, page 18 


their vote does not matter. 
They might well be assuming, 
also wrongly, that they do not 
have to do anything, and that 
their cheque will come in the 
post They need to be shocked, 
else they will wake up on 
Friday morning and the reali- 
ty win hit them that no cheque 
is coming.” 

Mr Sugar is not permitted 
under die scheme of arrange- 
ment through which he plans 
to take Amstrad private to vote 
his shares on his own propos- 
al Amstrad has an issued 
capital of 581 minion shares, 
of which Mr Sugar’s holding 
is 205 mfllioa It is the 
majority of non-Sugar share- 
holders and non-Sugar 
shareholdings that win deter- 
mine the outcome at Thurs- 
day’s meeting. 

The proxy count shows that 
by Thursday night. 3,932 
shareholders had voted for tire 
30p offer, and 5.51 1 against 
The number of shares repre- 
sented was 34.1 million for, 
and 32.8 million against On 
those totals. Mr Sugar's plan 
would be thrown out 

Gideon Hegel • of the 
Amstrad Shareholders Chib 
opposed to Mr Sugar’s plan 
yesterday lodged 270 proxies 
representing more than 1 
million shares with Amstrad. 

Mr Sugar re-affirmed that if 
the vote went against him on 
Thursday he “would not do 
anything spiteful or disrup- 
tive". He said: “Up till now, I 
have worked for the best 



Sugar shock treatment 

interests of the company, and I 
made the 3 Op offer in what I 
believe to be the best interests 
of all shareholders. If the vote 
goes against me, 1 will have to 
think about putting myself 
first I would have to consider 
nty position. I would take a 
dignified position." 

Thursday's meeting win be 
at The Insurance Hall 
Alderm anbury. London, 
whose Great Hall holds 320. 
If all 3 1.469 Amstrad share- 
holders turn up, alternative 
arrangements win have to be 
made. Amstrad said. 


STEPHEN MABKESON 



Future looks flat David lliompson of Wolverhampton & Dudley forecasts faffing beer consumption 


Brewer lifts 
dividend on 
£3 5m profit 

By Marttn Waller 

DAVID Thompson, manag- 
ing director of Wolverhamp- 
ton & Dudley Breweries and a 
seasoned observer of the brew- 
ing scene, has served up a 
gfoomy forecast of faffing beer 
consumption for the next three 
years. Any upturn thereafter is 
seen as shared by imports. 

Pre-tax profits rose from 
£33 mffikm to £35.2 miffion in 
the year to end-September. A 
better-than-expected 7.1p fi- 
nal dividend, bringing the 
total to 11. 4p from 103p, 
lifted the shares 9p to 535p. 

The company is forecasting 
another 3 per cent off nation- 
al beer volumes next year, and 
Mr Thompson does not ex- 
pect any upturn until 1996 
when rising persona! incomes 
should boost the market 
Even then, “the UK market is 
going to lose quite a lot as a re- 
sult of imports from France”. 

The outlook for Wolver- 
hampton in 1993, therefore, 
was bleak with fewer oppor- 
tunities to raise margins 


prices. Demand had 
steadily since the recession 
started in some of its pubs as 
customers felt the squeeze on 
spending. 

“We would remain very 
cautious.” said Mr Thomp- 
son. “There are a lot of young 
people who are unemployed 
and on benefit If you are 
working class and unemploy- 
ed. you are very hard up." 


Abbey sells unclaimed shares 


by Lindsay Cook, money editor 


ABBEY National sold 28.9 
million shares yesterday that 
had remained unclaimed 
Since the bank converted from 
a bidding society in 1989. It 
is to give £5 million of the 
proceeds to charity and pocket 
ihe other £98 million. 

The shares were bought by 
Warburgs and Kleuiwort Ben- 
son at 356p and then placed 
with institutions at 360p. 
When the Abbey floated in 
1989, 5.6 million qualifying 
members were offered 100 
free shares in the bank, but 


despite a long series of letters 
inviting them to apply, several 
hundred thousand never got 
round to it and under the 
terms of the conversion the 
bank was allowed to sell the 
shares. 

The 295,000 or so mem- 
bers who have not claimed can 
still do so at any time over the 
next six years. In the summer 
Abbey sent letters to 390,000 
people it thought was eligible, 
and placed advertisements in 
newspapers. Since then 
165.000 have made claims 


and 95,000 have received 100 
shares, plus net dividends. A 
few are still being verified. 
Those who now make a claim 
will receive £356 phis divi- 
dends, net of tax. 

Abbey National Charitable 
Trust will use the £5 mfllion to 
make donations to a range of 
charities, inducting those for 
the homeless and giving debt 
advice. 

Hie bank now has to deride 
how the £98 million will 
appear on its profit and loss 
account 


Tempos, page 18 


Jaguar proves it has not lost its teeth 


By Jon Ashworth 

THE end of the recession 
pulls up in our living rooms 
next week in the shape of six 
fuel-injected cylinders of pol- 
ished. purring, cfarome-and- 
steel British workmanship at 

its best Jaguar, the luxury car 

maker which is now Ameri- 
can-owned, is cashing in on a 
surge in sates across the 
Atlantic with a bumper 
Christmas television advertis- 
ing campaign.. 

In America, where the Jag- 
uar emblem inspires images 
of Harrods, Barbour jackets 
and tea at the Rite, die sleek 
saloons have suddenly be- 
come affordable as well as 
fashionable. 

Thanks to the weaker 
pound, would-be country 
gents can now pickup a top- 
of-jhe-range Jaguar Vanden 
Has sedan for $57,750. In 
British showrooms, a similar 
model sells for about £40,000. 
Such is the demand for new 



models that Jaguar is keeping 
employees at its plants at 
Browns lane. Coventry, and 
Castle Bromwich. West Mid- 
lands, working five instead of 
four days a week during 
December, enough to pro- 
duce an extra 300 cars. 

As its sister company, Ford 
UK, puts thousands of staff 
ou short-time working. Jaguar 
is going to the other extreme. 
If a hnemy car maker can 
afford to do that in these 
bleak times, can the end of the 


recession be far away? Jag- 
uar's former employees might 
see it a little differently. More 
than 5300 jobs have been cut 
since Ford bought the com- 
pany for £1.6 billion in 1989. 
The American workforce was 
cut by 1 0 per cent last month 
and a further 200 UK jobs are 
to go by the spring. 

Almost 12 years have gone 
by since the Big Cat last 
stalked British television 
screens. The £2 million com- 
mercial, winch will be shown 


for the first time on Monday 
evening, features a young 
Spanish boy enviously strok- 
ing the bonnet of a sleek 
Jaguar XJ6 and dreaming of 
the day when he, too, might 
own one. The television adver- 
tising will spearhead a bar- 
rage of commercials and 
events designed to promote 
the new 1993 model range. 

Other dements in a mas- 
sive promotional package in- 
clude a worldwide golf 
competition, day pigeon 
shooting, concerts and theat- 
rical events, tours of French 
wine growing areas, antique 
roadshows and fashion eve- 
nings. To round it off 50,000 
potential buyers will receive a 
copy of the Jaguar owner's 
handbook and be offered a 
test drive. 

Those who respond qnkkfy 
enough will get to ride along- 
side a Jaguar racing team 
driver in the new flagship 
XJ220, the world’s fastest 
production car. 


JUDGE THE BEST CHRISTMAS 
PRESENT FOR YOUR WIFE 



WHITTINGDALE 
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contact your usual Financial Adviser or call ut on 071 606-3/32. Remember the price ofiudtsmd 
the income from them mas go down at well as up. Whittuigdale Unit Trust Management LinuM 
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18 BUSINESS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


Barclays plans for 
£200m provision 
over Inuy exposure 


By Neil Bennett 
BANKING CORRESPONDENT 

BARCLAYS is planning to 
make a £200 million provision 
against its lending to Imiy. the 
troubled private property 
group, one of the largest bad 
debt provisions in history. 

The bank is expected to 
reveal the provision in a 
special Stock Exchange an- 
nouncement before Christ- 
mas. U has a £440 million 
exposure to Imiy and is work- 
ing dosely with the company 
to ensure it stays afloat. 

The City has been con- 
cerned about the size of 
Barclays’ exposure to Imiy for 
several months and the bank 
wants to make an announce- 
ment to remove fears that die 
provision will be even larger. 

A spokesman for the bank 


■ Barclays, Britain's biggest bank, will be 
obliged to make record provisions of more 
than £2 billion against bad debts this year 
and may be forced to cut its dividend 


said reports of the provision 
and the forthcoming an- 
nouncement were speculative 
and refused to comment on 
them. In 1990. however, the 
bank made a similar state- 
ment after the collapse of 
British & Commonwealth, the 
financial services group, when 
it made a £98 million 
provision. 

The Imiy provision will be 
the largest single element in 
record bad debt figures. Ana- 
lysts expect the bank to make 
provisions of more than £2 
billion on its lending. These. 


Hong Kong ends 
its losing streak 

From Lulu Yu in Hong Kong 


HONG Kong shares re- 
bounded sharply yesterday 
after four days* heavy losses. 
The Hang Seng index gained 
290 points, or 5.8 per cent. to 
close at 5.268 on a turnover of 
HK$5.4 billion. 

Bargain hunters pushed up 
prices' in early trading after 
sharp gains made by Hong 
Kong shares in London over- 
night But the index fell back 
in the afternoon as political 
uncertainties swept the stock 
market 

Hang Seng index futures 
dosed at a discount after 
trading ar a big premium, 
showing that sentiment even- 
tually turned sour. 

The rally was helped by the 
fact that while there was no 
solution to the dispute be- 
tween Britain and China over 
the colony’s political reforms, 
there had been no bad news 
either. Peking has issued no 
further threat to retaliate 
against British plans for Hong 
Kong democracy. But analysts 


are not optimistic that the 
recovery will last Most expect 
the index to foil below 5,000 
again next week. 

Alan Hargreaves, of Hoaze 
Govett Asia, said the rebound 
was merely technical after the 
market’s 8 per cent loss on 
Thursday. John Mulcahy, of 
Peregrine Brokerage, said that 
Hong Kong's political risk 
would be high in the minds of 
local and foreign investors. 
“The time hasn’t come to pfle 
in on the assumption that we 
have hit bottom.” 

Investors are relieved that 
Britain and China will be 
meeting on Tuesday to at- 
tempt to resolve the current 
deadlock, but Anthony Gals- 
worthy. British team leader of 
the joint liaison group, has 
refused to promise any posi- 
tive result 

Meanwhile. Douglas Hurd, 
the foreign minister, has 
stressed London's hill backing 
for Chris Patten. Hong Kong 
governor. 


Coal contracts ‘should 
not prejudice’ review 


Bv Patricia Tehan 

MICHAEL Heseltine, trade 
secretary, issued a veiled warn- 
ing to the dectridty industry 
yesterday, urging the genera- 
tors and distribution com- 
panies to make sure their coal 
contracts "do not prq'udice” 
the outcome of the govern- 
ment’s review of the coal 
industry. 

In reply to a parliamentary 
question an the coal contract 
negotiations from Matthew 
Carrington. Conservative M P 
lor Fulham. Mr Heseltine 
said he had written to Neil 
Clarke, chairman of British 
Coal, the two electricity gener- 
ators and the 1 2 supply com- 
panies in England and Wales, 
to make this dear. 

The government's review is 
investigating the case for the 
planned closure of 2 1 pits and 
prospects for Britain's coal 
industry. 

In the letter to Mr Clarke, 
Mr Heseltine stated that given 



Heseltine; letter to Clarke 

deep concern about the out- 
come of the review, he hoped 
negotiations between British 
Coal and the dectridty indus- 
try would lead to agreed 
arrangements that would “en- 
sure a sound and stable basis 
for the British coal industry 
and the electridty supply in- 
dustry to plan their buriness at 
least for 1 993-4”. 


they forecast, could plunge the 
bank into losses of up to £1 00 
million and force it to cut its 
dividend. 

Reports of the provision 
against the Imiy loans appear 
in tibe latest issue of European 
Banker, along with an exclu- 
sive interview of Sir John 
Quinton, the outgoing chair- 
man of Barcatys. 

In the interview, he admits 
there was a breakdown in 
communication between the 
bank’s head office and its 
regions in the late eighties. 
That led to a boom in com- 
mercial property loans even 
though tiie bank tried to 
impose a cap on the lending as 
early as 1988. 

Sir John said: “We said (hat 
property lending had reached 
a certain point and that is 
where it has got to stop . . . but 
in practice., mere was a good 
deal of property lending done 
within that cap.” The bank's 
property loan book grew from 
£2.1 billion at the end of 1987 
to £5.4 billion in 1991. 

“We have been caught out 
by a number of lendings that 
were made in the 1 988-9 era 
which, with hindsight, we 
should not have made. I think 
we could have been sterner in 
those days,” he added. 

Sir John said the bank had 
tried to improve internal com- 
munication but that lending 
policy was hampered by 
strong autonomy in the re- 
gions and local branches. 

Sir John said the bank was 
trying to “pick itself up and 
dust itself off” after the reces- 
sion, and that one of his chief 
regrets was that he did not 
forecast the recession. But he 
claims he would have needed 
a great deal of foresight to see 
it coming. 

Sir John stepped down as 
chief executive last summer 
and plans to retire as chair- 
man at the end of the year. In 
the interview, he suggests he 
was disappointed that the 
board did not have a wider 
choice of possible successors. 

Andrew Buxton, his replace- 
ment is a member of one of 
the bank's founding families, 
but Sir John said he doubted 
that Mr Buxton’s successor 
would also come from a bank 
family. He also suggested that 
Barclays would begin to look 
outside the bank for a new 
chairman if there are no 
suitable internal candidates. 



Looking bade Sir John Quinton think s bank should have been sterner on lending 


KIO’s Spanish group goes 
into voluntary liquidation 


From Edward Owen in Madrid 


MAHMOUD A1 Noun, the 
new president of the Kuwait 
Investment Office in London 
announced yesterday in Ma- 
drid the suspension of pay- 
ments. or voluntary liqui- 
dation of the KIO’s troubled 
Torres group, in Spain 
Torres, which employs 30,000 
people, owes 1 00 billion pese- 
tas (£568 million), mostly to 
the KIO. 

Jose Maria Stampa Braun, 
a law firm, is preparing legal 
action on behalf of the KIO 
against Javier de la Rosa. 45. 
who was the KIO’s agent in 
Spain until he resigned this 
summer. Several prominent 
Kuwaitis, some believed to be 
members of the royal family, 
are also dted for alleged 
irregularities discovered by 
new KIO directors in connec- 


tion with the management of 
Torres. Senor de la Rosa built 
up the group by acquiring 
Torres. Spam's most impor- 
tant paper pulp manufactur- 
er. Ebro, its biggest sugar and 
rice producer, Ercros, the 
biggest chemicals and 
fertilizer company and Prima, 
a large prope r ty company. 

The KIO appointed Senor 
de la Rosa, then an unproven 
banker, in 1984 and has since 
invested about Pta500 billion 
in Spain, some 5 per cent of 
its worldwide petrodollar 
investments. 

Torres appeared to prosper 
but it has since been alleged 
that Senor de la Rosa and his 
Kuwaiti partners bought ail- 
ing companies and then 
publicised massive expansion 
plans for them. It is also 


alleged that they sold the 
shares at inflated prices and 
made huge profits offshore. 

Last year. Senor de la Rosa 
claimed that the group had 
sales of Pta250 billion and 
assets of Pta700 billion, and 
declared a Pta2.8 billion prof- 
it for 1991. An audit turned 
this into a Pta37 billion loss 
and the true figure could be 
even worse. 

When the Kuwaiti govern- 
ment decided to cash in its 
investments to pay for re- 
building the country after the 
Gulf war. the new directors 
discovered the alleged impro- 
prieties in Spam. 

Last month. Salomon 
Brothers, the American in- 
vestment bank, told the KIO 
that it was not legally obliged 
to keep Torres going. 


Job losses grow by another 1,100 


Bv Patricia Tehan 

THE loss of another 1,1 00 jobs yesterday 
took to 20.820 the number of people to be 
told this week that their jobs will go. That 
included 1 6,200 at the Post Office; 1 ,300 
at Royal Ordnance; 200 at Lloyd's of 
London; and 900 with the closure of the 
Cammell Laird shipyard. 

More gloomy news is expected next 
week, with Ford poised to announce 
3,000 job cuts. Britain’s fourth largest 
building society. Alliance & Leicester, 
revealed plans to axe 400 jobs over the 
next one to two years. They will be shed ar 
its two administrative centres, at Oadby. 
near Leicester, and at Hove. East Sussex. 
APV, which makes food and drink 


processing equipment is to dose its 
Rochester plant with the loss of more than 
200 jobs and Blockleys, the brick maker, 
is to shed 40 staff after a decision to cut 
production levels. 

The building sodety shed 85 jobs at the 
two centres in March, and more losses are 
expected once the sodety has finished a 
review of staffing numbers in its branch 
network next year. Alliance & Leicester 
said it hopes to achieve the reductions 
through voluntary redundancy, natural 
wastage and cutting back temporary and 
casual posts. It said it does not plan to 
dose branches, Peter White, group chief 
executive, said; “I greatly regret having to 
take this step but, like other finandal 
organisations it is essential for us to dosely 


control costs. It is a question of good 
housekeeping and efficiency.” 

APV said there would be “a small 
number^ of opportunities for redeploy- 
ment within the group for the 233 staff. 
The company has sites at Crawley. 
Dartford, Eastbourne, Grimsby, Leeds, 
Newcastle upon Tyne. Peterborough. 
Stoke-on-Trent, and East Kilbride. 

Ninety jobs, induding 70 redundan- 
ces. are also to go at Paxman Diesels in 
Colchester. Essex, over the next three 
months. 

Meanwhile. Renault Truck Industries, 
of Dunstable, said yesterday that a 
restructuring will cut by more than half 
the number of its employees over the next 
1 S months as 280 jobs are shed. 


John Menzies to dose 
Early Learning in US 

SHARES in John Menzies. the Edinburgh newspaper 
retailer and wholesaler, jumped 13pto459p on news that the 
company had abandoned plans to sell its troubled Early 
Learning Centres operation in America and instead decided 
to dose it down. 

The group wrote off £15.2 million in 1990 for 
restructuring the business, seen in the City as an unwise 
diversification, and took a further £7 million provision earlier 
this year. Menzies said talks with potential buyers had not 
been successful, and all viable options had been exhausted. 
The dosure of the American operation, at a cost thaz would be 
fully covered by existing provisions, would come immediately 
after die Christmas trading period. Kimlan Cook, retail 
analyst at County NalWest, said the share price rise in thin 
trading was the result of the market's “welcome relief that 
the situation had been resolved. 

BA meets over Qantas 

THE board of British Airways met yesterday to consider the 
purchase of a large minority stake in Qantas, the stale-owned 
Austr alian airline, which the Australian government has 
earmarked for privatisation. A spokesman for BA said that no 
decision was readied, but that the company will make up its 
mind tty Wednesday, the deadline set tty the Australian 
government BA is among three companies to have expressed 
an interest, the others being Singapore Airlines and Air New 
Zealand. Earlier this week, Roger Maynard, BA’s director of 
corporate strategy, said that BA would put together a 
consortium of companies to bid for a 49 per cent stake. 

Receivers called in 

GUY Warwick, a Nottinghamshire-based supplier of trousers 
to high street chains induding C&A and Top Shop, has been 
placed in receivership. Touche Ross is urgently seeking a 
buyerforthe company, that blames its financial difficulties on 
a sudden foil in post-Christmas orders. The town of 
Bfisthorpe, home to nearly half the 242 jobs threatened by 
die dosure, is the site of one of the coal pits earmarked for 
possible dosure by British Coal and many of the miners 1 
wives are employed by Guy Warwick. There are fears that any 
subsequent pit dosure could result in virtual 100 per cent 
unemployment in the town. 

Nu-Swift passes payout 

NU-SWIFT, the fire protection, office deaning and property 
group, has passed its interim dividend (lOp) after pre-tax 
profits fell from £ 1 1.3 million to £2.5 million in the six 
months to end-June. Operating profits nearly doubled to 
£1 1.2 million (E6 million) but property and exchange losses, 
with a leap in interest charges, drag gad down the results. An 
interest in London Securities has been written off resulting in 
a loss of £2.7 million. Nu-Swift paid out £4.2 million in 
interest (E 5.7 million receipts) and exchange losses on foreign 
currencies were £1.2 mfllian. Earnings per share were 5. 09p 
(17.04p). 

Opec output ‘easing’ 

THE Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries has 
appeared to ease the rise in output that has been blamed for 
the foil in oil prices, says the International Energy Agency. 
The IEA also upheld its forecast of strong demand for Opec 
oQ and industry stocks in the crucial Januaiy-March quarter. 
The latest IEA monthly report revised down its estimate of 
Opec output for October by 100.000 barrels per day (bpd) to 
25.2 million bpd and said output seemed to stabilise at that 
level in November. The IEA narrowly upgraded its forecast of 
likely demand for crude from Opec and oil company stocks in 
the winter quarter by 200.000 bpd to 26.8 million bpd. 

Cutback clips Dobson 

STEPS to cut more than 400 jobs at Dobson Park Industries, 
the industrial electronics and mining equipment group, left it 
nursing pre-tax profits of £1 0.3 million (£1 3. 1 million) in the 
53 weeks to October 3. The number of employees fdl from 
4,043 to 3,615 over the course of the year, resulting in 
reorganisation costs of £2.8 million (£2.5 million). Alan Kaye, 
chairman, said: “The difficult trading conditions experienced 
by an divisions intensified during the year as other European 
economies moved into recession. Earnings were 5.52p 
(7.05p) a share. A maintained 3.85p final leaves tiie total 
dividend at 5.75p. The shares eased 4p to 58p. 

VTech falls at half time 

VTECH Holdings, the electronics, computers and telecom- 
munications group that is based in Hong Kong and came to 
the market in October, saw pre-tax profits fan to US$1 1.2 
million (US$20.6 million) in the six months to end- 
September. Turnover advanced to US$294.5 million 
(US$286.2 million). Earnings decreased to 5.1 cents (12.2 
cents) a share. There is a 1 cent (3 cents) interim dividend. 
Price protection daims in the Amefican personal computer 
market resulted in operating losses. Outside America, 
personal computer sales rose 56 per cent. Sales of satellite 
television receivers to Germany fell 20 per cent 


THE SUN DAY TIMES 

Hong Kong 
howls 

£ Hong Kong is 
reverberating to howls 
of anguish from the 
business community as 
the wildly fluctuating 
market is blamed on 
the democratisation 
policy of the governor 
Chris Patten . . 

Business Focus 
— The Sunday Times 
tomorrow 


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TEMPUS 




Flat outlook at Wolves & Dudley 


DAVID Thompson at Wol- 
verhampton & Dudley Brew- 
eries was in unusually 
downbeat mood yesterday. 
Not normally short of ideas 
on how the brewing industry 
should arrange its affairs, 
Mr Thompson was forced to 
admit that the purchase of 
Camerons a year ago, the 
company’s biggest corporate 
move, had not been as suc- 
cessful as boped. 

Camerons, bought from 
Brent Walker for a remark- 
ably cheap £20.5 million, will 
come good in the end but is 
still running on trading mar- 
gins of just 2.4 percent, and 
the expected dilution of 
Wolves & Dudley's earnings 
in 1991-2 wfil now extend 
into the present year. 

In the year to end-Septem- 
ber, the group pushed tax- 
able preproperty profits up 
from £32.7 millio n to £34.6 
million, but the £1.9 million 
difference equalled income 
from acquisitions, primarily 
Cameron, added to the non- 
repeating exceptional cost 

Wolves & Dudley’s prob- 
lems. despite its excellent 
management are largely de- 
mographic and centre on its 
position in the Midlands 


market where it is hindered 
by a dutch of 60 or 70 pubs 
on sink housing estates, less 
than 10 per cent of the total 
pubs owned, which are ex- 
ceptionally vulnerable to the 
recession. 

The market was kept sweet 
by an unppected 10.7 per 
cent rise in total dividends, 
although this slimmed cover 
from 3J» to 33 times, and 
pushed up the shares by 9p 
to 53 5p. Pre-tax profits this 
year will have to motor to 
exceed £37 million, putting 
the shares on a multiple of 
about 13-Sp.Hie shares have 
tumbled from their high of 
653p in May as doubts over 
Cameron have grown but 
they cannot be expected to 
outperform in the near term. 


Evode 

THE cat and mouse takeover 
game between Wassail and 
Evode Group is now well 
underway. 

Wassail's 80p a share cash 
offer is formally on the table. 
Evode's defence document 
and audited preliminary fig- 
ures for the year ended 
October 3 have just been 



Simon: battling well 

served. Evode's 1 992 pre-tax 
profits progression in the 53 
weeks ended October 3 — 
from £73 million to £10-2 
million — and the advance at 
the operating level in profits 
from continuing operations 
from El 1.8 million to £143 
million, suggest Evode is 
battling well against die re- 
cession that has hit both 
sides of the Atlantic. 

Net borrowings have been 
cut from £46.1 million to 
£28.5 mfliion. and on 


Evo de's definition (the dollar 
preference issue is included 
as equity), gearing has been 
clipped from 78 per cent to 
50 per cenL Excluding the 
preference capital gearing is 
about 200 per cent, of which 
Wassail will make much 
play. 

The final dividend is held 
at l.Sp a share, making an 
unchanged 3.5 8 p, though 
this is not covered by report- 
ed basic earnings of 33p a 
share. 

The thrust of Evode’s de- 
fence is that shareholders 
should not for a mere 80p, 
surrender at this point the 
opportunity of the rewards 
that are coming their way as 
their group makes further 
progress. 

Pre-tax profits this year 
could edge up to £12.5 mil- 
lion. analysts suggest 

On present evidence from 
Evode. run by Andrew Si- 
mon and with its share price 
at 91p. there is no reason to 
accept 8 Op from Wassail. 
Should Wassail come back 
with a higher offer, then 
Evode shareholders wfil have 
to think again. Meanwhile, 
Evode shareholders should 
sit tight 


•'--c '■ ; Bflnj 


— — — .-g - -.far ry- 


GOVERNMENT securities 
had a quieter day. with most 
stocks ending little changed, 
after Wednesday's auction 
and Thursday's hectic follow- 
up. “Its been a quiet end to a 
fairly frenetic week in the gilts 
market,” Simon Thorp- bead 
of gilt trading at County 
NatWest, said. 

Stocks opened higher on the 
back of sterling’s renewed 
strength, but prices fell back 


towards their opening levels 
after sterling dipped back. 
American economic statistics 
failed to provide any stimulus. 
The domestic marker did not 
find any encouragement from 
Europe as German and 
French bond markets dipped. 

The gilt future ended two 
ticks firmer at £99 ,7 /32, as 
volume for March reached 
23.000 contracts. 

Cash stocks saw good two- 


way business and some profit 
taking, with shorts ending a 
few tides higher while lon{£ 
finished with losses of a few 
tides. Dealers expect shorts to 
continue to do well on the back 
of anticipated rale cuts in 
Europe. Exchequer 94» per 
cent 1998 firmed two ticks to 
£109 3 /32. while at the longer 
end Treasury 9 per cent 201 2 
gave up early gains to finish 
unchanged at £10 1 23 /^. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


PROFILE 19 


BUSINESS PROFILE: Tom Peters 


Millionaire marketing guru who reigns supreme 


Carol Leonard finds that America 
highly paid busin ess observer 
is an unexpectedly modest man 


ADRIAN BROOKS 


T he Tom Peters roadshow 
was in town. It arrives in 
London once every three 

or four months, so that the 

American marketing guru, as he is 
traditionally styled, can give lucra- 
tive lectures — charging $55,000 

an hour — or promote his latest 

book. 

On this occasion. Peters has 
crossed the Atlantic with the latter 
aim in mind. His coterie of public 
relations advisers have been mas- 
terminding the British launch of 
his new tome. Liberation Manage- 
ment: Necessary Disorganisation 
for the Nanosecond Nineties. 

Peters co-operates with them 
fully. He knows only too well from 
whence his next dollar comes. This, 
after all, is his third major literary 
work. The first. In Search of 
Excellence, published almost ten 
years ago, has gone down in history 
as the biggest selling management 
tide ever. It turned Peters into a 
millionaire from royalties alone. 

The second, 

which hit the 

bookshops in ‘T hate 

1989, was enti- 1 Hdlc 

tied Thriving on TTlfVnPV 
Chaos, and con- 

tradicted much of j-n rm 

what had gone ' UJ ■ 

before. As his crit- npontiat 

ics were quick to nc 5 UUai 

point out, the sec- absurd 

ond book was ' 
necessary 

because so many of the companies 
cited in the first book as “examples 
of excellence” had since fallen by 
the wayside. “Flexibility”, accord- 
ing © Peters, was now the key 
management word. 

Those same critics remain silent, 
however, when it comes to examin- 
ing the management — or rather 
marketing — of Tom Peters him- 
self. Even they are forced to admit 
that it is excellence in action. The 
Eighties have come and gone, the 
Nineties are well under way, and 
still Peters reigns supreme. 

Newspaper reports abound of his 
style in the lecture hall. Of the way 
he roams around the audience, 
wearing a tweed jacket rather than 
a suit, speaking without notes for 
an entire day. Of the fees he is able 
to charge, averaging about £700 a 
head, with companies such as 
British Gas, Royal Mail IBM, I Cl 
and Shell happy to pay such sums 
so that their executives can hear 
first-hand what Peters has to say. As 


with anything that appears to be so 
effortless, however, the prepara- 
tions behind die scenes are exact- 
mg- His arrival in London to 


promote Liberation Management 
was, for example, heralded about 
six weeks before, with public rela- 
tions assistants offering half-hour 
interview dots to every relevant 
journalist. 

A request from The Times for a 
full hour was greeted with a gasp 
down the telephone line, hurried 
consultation and then, with til- 
disguised reluctance, agreement 
The suites of rooms in the Park 
Lane Hotel had been booked, one 
as a service station for attendant 
flunkies, from which to ply Peters 
and his successive visitors with 
refreshments, and another in 
which the interviews could be 
conducted. Notice boards erected 
in die hotel corridor, announcing 
his presence, would be enough to 
send any more ordinary hotel 
guest, who mistakenly found his 

way on to the 

fourth floor, scut- 

Sft^be^ 

►omeone m 561156 

is an extraord*- 
offiCG nary mortal. 

Someone who 
‘9 Tt’9 an needs to be cos- 

1L b cU1 seted and cared 

lumber’ for like no oa,a. 

Whose every ut- 
terance should be 
written down and then analysed in 
case it contains a deeper meaning. 
It must be similar to the build-up 
given before a tabloid newspaper 
interview with. say. BiDy Graham. 
Michael Jackson or Ivana Trump. 
This may be London's Piccadilly, 
but this is nevertheless the 
magnificent American marketing 
machine in fuD swing. 

The door to the interview room is 
flung open and you brace yourself 
for that first encounter. There, 
carefully positioned in die middle 
of a rote, with an armchair either 
side, sits die unexpected figure of 
Peters. He is alone and looks 
entirely out of place. The tweed 
jacket is as described, but there are 
also scuffed, thick-soled, brown 
shoes, standard-issue grey flannel 
trousers and a tie. Peters says that 
the tie means that he has made an 
effort. “When in Rome, and all that 
..."At home, he lives in sweat-suits. 
In his office he teams a sweat shirt 
with denim jeans instead. Peters. 




‘I hate talking 
money. Someone 
in my office 
negotiates. It’s an 
absurd numbed 



Kay cosmetics, one of those high 
pressure sales organisations. I 
came back to the office one time 
and Betsy said 1 just got you 
$10,000 for a speech. She said 1 
was talking to these people and 
they were really keen to get you and 
they asked die price. She said 
$12,000 and they said that’s ab- 
surd and so die said $10,000 and 
they said okay. 

“There is a big industry in the US 
for talkers at organisational meet- 
ings and in that market there is a 
price. Norman Schwarzkopf was at 
the top of toe market last year, 
getting $75,000 a time, Kissinger 
was top of the league for a while, 
then Reagan and OUie North. But 
I’ve been in the top ten for a long 
time — I’ve out-lasted them all. I 
find it all thoroughly amusing but 
also totally embarrassing. I hate 
talking money. Someone in my 
office does all the negotiating. It’s 
an absurd number, for Christ’s 
sake.” Apart from his home in 
northern California’s silicon valley, 
and his working dairy farm in 
Vermont — with its cows, sheep, 
goats and lamas — Peters insists 
that his life-style has changed little. 
"I would be a fool to say that it 
hasn’t changed at all. but I have 
avoided all the soda! crap which 
could go along 




mm 


Fresh focus: Tom Peters agrees to let The Times take a new shot at presenting his imag e 


who has just turned 50, deariy has 
no problem with his naturally 
scruffy, relaxed appearance. He 
agrees that, left to his own devices, 
he looks very different to die person 
depicted in tile carefully styled 
publicity photograph which has 
beat supplied on demand, without 
variation, for the past three years. 

He is compliant, however, when 
asked to pose for a new shot As The 
Times photographer positions him 
in an upright chair, with a copy of 
the newspaper in his hands, Peters 
remarks that he is happy to be 
photographed reading any page 
“except die stock price page — I 
onfy buy stock in one company, and 
that’s my own." An extraordinary 
statement from a man who is so 
sought after to advise others on how 
to govern their corporate affairs. At 


the heart of any company is. after 
all, its balance sheet, and the pulse 
rale can be critically influenced by 
die investments it does or does not 
make. So where, I ask, does Peters, 
a former McKinsey consultant, 
with an MBA from Stanford, invest 
his own money? 

“Ninety per cent of it is in real 
estate,” he says. He means in the 
two bouses in which he lives. “1 
don’t have any financial planning 
at all and smelts and shares have 
never interested me. I wouldn’t 
even know how to go about it After 
die first book was written, my wife 
and 1 bought a very nice house in 
California. Then we got turned on 
by Vermont We bought 1.300 
acres, but lest that sound like an 
estate, a lot of it is straight up, on a 
mountain. When we tried to find 


an area to play croquet we couldn’t 
find enough land that was flat 1 
would like to think that my view of 
business is not that far removed 
from Anita Roddick's — that the 
essence of business is fun." 

How then, does this unexpected- 
ly modest man have the gall to 
charge such vast fees? “Its actually 
more like $50,000 for a two-hour 
presentation.” he begins. “It is 
obscene. Trust me, that is an 
obscene amount of money.” Peters 
laughs. “But don’t ask me why 
people pay it ask the person who 
signs the cheque.” He explains that 
he originally based his fee structure 
on the $1,000 a day charged by 
McKinsey. “Then a wonderful 
thing happened to me. A woman 
came to work for us who had been a 
part-time saleswoman for Mary 


with it. I do not 

enjoy hanging ‘T vvoulc 

out with people 1 WUUAL 

who wear suits, o av w, 
or the rich and LU 111 

famous. I would Viaen’t r 

much rather H 

^ but 1 ha ' 

Kck" ftesoc 

a big company in 
the US." Peters grew up in "a 
typical American 1950s suburb” 
outside Baltimore. Maryland. An 
only child, he describes his father as 
“a typical employee of that era: 44 
years with one company, the Balti- 
more Gas and Electric Company. 
He was a credit and collections 
manager.” His tether was. he says, 
“very reticent” while his mother — 
now aged 83 — is. superficially at 
least, more like her son. 

“Ninetyeight per cent of the 
traits that you might associate with 
me seem to be mother-oriented. In 
a 15-floor elevator ride she will 
make four friends. That’s not a 
joke, it happens. But they were both 
readers. My most cherished Christ- 
mas presents were always books, 
historical novels.” In keeping with 
that upbringing, his second wife. 
Kate, from whom he has inherited 
two step-children, is a poet and 
once ran a book shop in Palo Alto. 
California. .. 

As a schoolboy he was. he says. 


‘I would be a fool 
to say my life-style 
hasn’t changed, 
but I have avoided 
the social crap’ 


“really unwretched, which I find a 
wretched phenomenon. I got good 
grades which 1 find disgusting. It 
feels very one-dimensional, but I do 
not think I was. I won some award 
for being more involved in extra- 
curricula activities than anyone 
else, but I was never a good athlete. 
All young American males want to 
be great jocks and I was not" • 

Since the age of nine, Peters had 
wanted to be an architect and he 
eventually went to a school of 
architecture. He left after a few 
months. “I realised that I had no 
chance of being the next Frank 
Lloyd Wright I bad no flail. I 
switched to engineering instead. 
I’m m irritated at mysdf because 
of it" 

He fell into his present career 
“entirely by chance” and finally 
found an area where he did have 
flair. Although it is not true that he 
speaks entirely without notes — “I 
do have a prompt sheet” — he bad 
always been a good talker. In 
debating contests in high school, 
marks were given for presentation 
and rebuttal. “I used to score 
reasonably well in presentation and 
automatically win in rebuttal.” 

Yet despite the bravado, and the 
polish and charm. Peters obviously 
exudes when he is performing, as 

he sits alone on 

his sofa there is 

* a fool 
life-style 

ifmtJpH are allowed to go. 
laiigcu, He b not ^ 

flvnifipH brash, uninhibit- 

uvuiucu ^ exhibitionist 

ll CT3.D’ bis reputation 
x* might lead you to 
believe. “Yes. I 
am definitely a loner.” he says. That 
feeling nr ns deep within him. 
“When 1 go to a social function or a 
party, even if ft is with one or two 
friends, I start getting quivers 
several hours before. They are truly 
agony for me. Perhaps 1 am a 
border-line depressive. Give me 
any scenario and I will always see 
the worst side." 

Peters admits to being fascinated 
by amateur psychology. He has 
used it to his advantage and on 
himself. 1 asked him how such a 
person could stand up in front of 
hundreds of complete strangers 
and repeatedly deliver such extraor- 
dinary performances that his cus- 
tomers keep coming back for more. 

u It has been said by wiser heads 
than mine that large numbers of 
people who spend their professional 
lives on a stage and in the theatre are 
phenomenally shy and use the public 
expression of theatre as their outlet 
My mother was genuinely gregari- 
ous. I am phenomenally shy." 


I. . H 


Matthew Bond 


Raise your glasses, Norman has 


seen little green shoots again 

RICHARD WILSON 


P repare to be overjoyed. 
1 have the most won- 
derful news for each 
and every one of you. Our 
troubles are over, the dark 

days behind us. Recovery is, at 
last on its way. 

Yes, yes, it’s official. Rush 
with impunity to your local 
Threshers and lay in tire fizz. 
Happy days are here again. 

What's that? How do I 
know? WeD that’s easy. I got a 
phone call from you-know- 
who. Wen. to be strictly accu- 
rate. I had two calls, but the 
first was from some double- 
barrelled law firm wanting to 
reverse tire charges and we 
have an in-house rule about 
not accepting those. But the 
second was from the man 
himself — Norman Lamont, 
in person. To say the Chancel- 
lor was on form is an under- 
statement. He was 
effervescent. 

“Matthew me old mucker," 
he beflowed, if I read my 
somewhat rusty shorthand 
correctly. “I’ve found themT 
“Calm down, calm down.” i 
replied, as the gabble contin- 
ued. "Start at the beginning 
and tell me the whole story.” 
He did, eventually, and the 
gist of what a still excitable 
Mr Lamont had to say I will 
now relate. Well . - - 
You remember those green 
shoots of recovery? How can 
we forget them. I hear you say. 
those mythical metaphors 
best known for their indefi- 
nite (infinite?) inappropriate- 
ness. WeD, not so fast The 
Chancellor has found them! 
Seems they were never miss- 
ing at all — just mislaid. 

They turned up, as we all 
know things do, while he was 
engaged in what rounds like & 
pretty frantic search for some- 
thing else. Not one corner of 
his mar\y residences was left 
unrummaged through. 
Whether he found what he 
was originally looking for, Mr 
Lamont was a tittle vague 
about but there was no 
hiding his joy at finally 
putting his hands on those 
little old green shoots t hat 
even he was beginning to 
think lost forever. But there 
they were — tucked in the top 
pocket of a long-forgotten 


GATOWICK 



sports jacket “Honestly Mat 
tbew. I could have kicked 
myself,” he finished. With 
supreme restraint I said 
nothing about the several 

million volunteers who would 

be happy to save him the 
effort 

“How many of these shoots 
ate there?” I asked. “Oh. a 
good handful.” he enthused. 
“A very good handful" 

Politely, I enquired for 
more details. “WeD. the best 
looking one is M0, w hich is 
growing like there’s no tomor- 
row.** (Advanced readers can 
award themselves an extra 
mark for knowing that for 
coincident indicators like M0, 
there is no tomorrow). 

Quick as a flash. I interrupt- 
ed. “Hang on. Norman. Five 
Green Shoots with One Called 
M0. Get me Lloyd Webber. I 
feel a musical coming oil” 

“Oh do shut up, you fool 
I’m tellingyoa about M0. You 
know, the coins and folding 
notes in your pocket” “Aim 
credit card slits in your jack- 


et?” I enquired. “No,** he 
snapped. “And stop interrupt- 
ing. Now M0 — it grew by 0.8 
per cent in November, which 
means 3 per cent in the last 
year. Now where does that 


leave your recession, eh?” 

Available from every Post 
Office: I thought silently. “But 
doesn't the foci that in the last 
three months, MO’S been 
growing at almost twice the 
official target range mean you 
wifi have to raise interest 

rates soon?” 

“I’ve warned you about 
interrupting before Now 
where was I? Ah yes — retail 
sales and inland telephone 
ralfc Both rising very encour- 
agingly you know.” 


M ust be afl those 
credit card calls. I 
thought, before 
quietly suggesting another 
possibility. “People phoning 
their Jobcentres?” 

There was a pause. I sensed 
growing hostility at the other 
end of the telephone. A ges- 


ture of conciliation was need- 
ed. “A trend which the freez- 
ing of the cost of inland calls 
can only help?” It worked. 
“Quite, quite.” 

The Chancellor returned to 
his theme. “Then, of course, 
there is the impact of lower 
interest rates beginning to 
come through, the lack of 
which was one of the main 
reasons I mislaid the green 
shoots in the first place. What 
a difference a year and no 
more Helmut Schlesinger 
makes. House prices have 
already tamed the corner.” 

“That’s the 0. 1 per cent rise 
in the Halifax house price 
index in November you’re 
referring to? What about the 2 
per cent foil that the Nation- 
wide index shows?” 

“Even Chancellors need a 
little ’Xtra help.” he bubbled. 
“But it is not just the housing 
market that is moving the 
right way. The stock market’s 
just hit a new all-time high; 
the pound is positively resur- 
gent against the dollar and 
marie and Germany looks 
smack on course for recession. 
The markets are never wrong, 
you know. They weren’t 
wrong in September and 
they're not wrong now." If 
Chancellors could skip while 
on the telephone. Mr Lamont 
would have done sa 

“So who was wrong in 
September?” I asked, only to 
be answered by a tuneful 
chorus of EveiytHngs Com- 
htg Up Roses. 

I persisted. “And what 
about all these job losses — 
85.000 since September, al- 
most 20,000 this week alone. 
Whatever happened to the 
Going for Growth plan?” 

The roses stopped coming 
up. “Going for Growth? 
Damn, when was that?” The 
sound of desperate hands 
being slapped on empty pock- 
ets could be beard down the 
telephone line. “Was that 
October? Which suit was I 
wearing? Or were we in the 
Country? My gardening trou- 
sers, perhaps? Or my dinner 
jacket? Please God not my 
white tie 

Cancel that Champagne. 
Cheap daret should suffice 
for now. 


AMSTERDAM 


UP TO SEVEN FLIGHTS A DAY 


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GATWICK- 

AMSTERDAM 


DEP 

ARR 

MON " 

FRI 

07.30 

09.35 

08.30 

10.35 

11.150) 

13-15 

12.50 

14.55 

17.00 

19.05 

18.50(0 

20.50 

20.30 

22.30 

SAT 

SUN 

08.30m 

1035 

12.50 

14.55 

17.00 

19.05 

2030 

22.30 

21.15® 

23.15 

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GATWICK 


’Offer doses 31st December 1992. If you book business class on our 2030 ffighL 
All times quoted arc local times and subject to change without notice. 


DEP 
MON - 

06.45 

ARR 

FRI 

06.50 

07.50 

07.55 

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10.35 

12.00 

1*05 

16.15 

16.15 

iaoo 

18.00 

19.45 

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SAT 

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07.50(2) 

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^ A 







20 MARKETS AND ANALYSIS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 




City scents Gardner Merchant deal 


TjTiiTS 


TH E betting in the City is that 
Forte is about to sell its 
Gardner Merchant contract 
catering arm for a sum that 
could exceed MOO million. 

The buyer is thought to be a 
consortium of institutions, 
headed by the venture capita] 
arm of British Coal Pension 
Funds, which is dose to clinch- 
ing die deaL The existing 
management of Gardner 
Merchant, the subject of a 
failed £500 million offer Grom 
Compass Group last year, will 
move across, but are not 
expected to take a large stake. 

Gardner Merchant’s airport 
catering arm, which accounts 
for about one-fifth of die 


division, will be retained by 
Forte. An announcement is 
possible early next week. 

Shares in P&O, which had 
been mentioned as a possible 
buyer, were initially marked 
down by 25p. but they ended 
at 460p. down l8p. Forte 
shares, bolstered by reports of 
option activity, firrned 2p to 
1 69p, after touching 1 74p, on 
volume of 2.8 million shares. 

Meanwhile, equities slipped 
back despite sterling's re- 
newed strength as reports of a 
couple of sell programme 
trades and lower futures 
prompted some profit-taking, 
pushing prices lower towards 
the dose. In an erratic trading 


FTatalttre 

index 

(rebased) 








. eSiKafc 




Dec Jan Fab Mar Apr May Jun Jut Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 


session, the FT-SE 100 index 
ended down 1 1 .6 points, at 
2,759.4, having been up 4.5 
at the start Volume reached a 
healthy 676.1 million shares, 
boosted by the programme 


IN ASSOCIATION WITH 

HAMBRO CLEARING LIMITED 

A LOW COST SHARE SELLING SERVICE FOR MOST UK SECURITIES 


PRIVATISATIONS (as fisted below) - For a £1040 fee per stock, for privatisations only, family 
members holding the same stock (same surname, same address) can sell their shares for £10.00 
phis £2.00 for each additional member up to a maximum of 4 members. 


OTHER SECURITIES - For a £10.00 minimum fee or 0.4% commission over a consideration of 
£2500 (ejj. £3000 = £12.00 commission). 


HOW TO SEU. 

1 . F»tn tfie coupon rigncd by al sJier rh oLdw , and send by 
first d»» post together with the letyantcertifiatets) to 
Hambro during tad. CardiH address Mow. but Hist the* to 
tee if Ihprdewnt share u pflcate ihaw a form of transfer on 
the bade, rf therein form then the regbtarad hoWn are to 
sign where it b martwL H not upon ranejpe of your eertificstai, 
Hambro Oaring mB send jnu a separate transfer which is to 
be signed by the registered holduW- Your sham cvnX be 
«oW untl the agned transfer form has beat returned signed. 


2. Hambro Gearing wMselymr shares the dajr after receipt 
of you signed c prtiftcattfof whar nyeprl iw the sep a ra te 
transfer form. 

3. A contract note twifirming sale details and a cheque post 
data! for the nest Stodr Eadunge Account Day (ess the 
Hambro Oeorlng seBng foe mU be sent to veu by post 

4. Ybu may set part ofyourshaietakSngai any one 
company far an adtMonai 15.00 to cover balance certificate 
costs. 

5. H you hmre any queries, ptaese do not hesrtata to can on 
0222473600. 


trades. Turnover received a 
boost as Kleinwort Benson 
and SG Warburg placed near- 
ly 29 million Abbey National 
shares, at 360p a share, with 
institutional investors. The 
shares, understood to have 
been bought from Abbey at 
356p, were those that were 
unclaimed by investors, or 
unallocated, when Abbey con- 
verted from a building society 
to a bank in July, 1989. 

The placing raised about 
£103 million, with £5 million 
of going to Abbey's Charitable 
Trust Shares in the Abbey 
National, which had its debt 
rating cut on Thursday by 
Moody's Investors Service, the 
American debt rating agency, 
fell 7p to 366p. on volume of 
66 million shares. 

Meanwhile. Hong Kong- 
related stocks remained jitteiy 
despite an overnight rebound, 
as China threatened to scrap 
foe 1984 agreement on the 
colony's future. Among those 


ed to see that it looks set for 
launch in the eariy part of next 
year." America is the most 
important market, with the 
drug's sales forecast to reach 
$1 billion over the next few 
years. 

ICI lost 12p to £10.36 as 
UBS Phillips and Drew down- 
graded its profit forecasts on 
concern that already difficult 
European trading conditions 
were getting tougher. P&D 
has cut this year's pretax 
profit estimate from £628 mO- 
lion to £580 million, with next 
year's cut from £800 million to 
£700 million. Second liners 
enjoyed decent volume again, 
as institutional investors rook 


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Dee 4 





iMddar due natty due 

natty 

OtatT* STHHBJ 22% 


EnCtfflUtI Q5rp 
Enron carp 
Btotm Cup 


Argyll Group, owner of Safe- 
way, rose 5p to 393p, after a 
buy recommendatkin from 
Credit Lyonnais Laing- CLL 
says the interims underlined 
its proven retail formula. 


FMC Cop 
FPL Droop 
Mml Ext 
M Ml W 
Hut oih^j 


Rot' noun nty 
Ah Hnl Grp 
Fluor Cot 
M Motor 
GTS COP 


Gip toe Dd 
Gen cinema 
Gen pntimlc 
Gen EfcBTte 


an interest in potential recov- 
ery stocks that have been 
neglected and in the addition- 



Glao ADR 


al 150 companies joining the 
FT-A AH-Share index from 


PRIVATISATIONS 

British Telecom (1st & 2nd Issue). British Airways. Rolls Royce. BAA &/ot bonus, 
British Steel, FSB &/or bonus, British Gas &/or bonus. Abbey National, BP, PowerGen, 
Scot Power. Nat Power. Scot Hydro Electricity 
12 Regional Electricity Companies and 10 Regional Water Companies 
Please sell Ihe following securities 

STOCKS TO BE SOLO AMOUNT BALANCE (r MEOUKH3) SKNAIUS OF RBBIEB1 HOLDER 


Buying in thin conditions 
lifted Intercare, die dental, 
optical and medical supplies 
group, by 9p to 170p. The 
shares win be in the FT-A all- 
share index from next year. 


HAMBRO CLEARING LIMITED, PO BOX 30. 1t3 BUTE ST, CARDIFF. CF1 6PA 


Signature 


. Daytime phone number 


IMPORTANT- PLEASE READ CARBUU.Y 

Hantbio Omring Ltd 01 accept no SaMiy for loss of catifeato* or inducement to «*. end b; jo aeoitton serve* onfe SmSd you beta 

mndnvdMyfoflwpaL JaRn.p to »ccBnaa|o u bandS adilw. 

w. i.u— n„ ,i„i„ m „ , Tamaofera m» be — cmed vf Hetinet UK LBfs matured deel ng 

rar«w Milp«l»ito ^aifc.W yjA»iifc| l mvtaweebhthaaabetdioityfalu-bigra^ttelyowtecfcBi 

lnniniMAiNfmpbwnara— BbaiwMnt»ramc«imaae»d antetefmttantaaeatyLMandlnsdnietUKareiiieabBsiif 

BfneKMrass and nma Mode. Your hnWngnuy be buSgnd^Ut die SMaed London Stock aebaage. 

often, tfab itwght mean you itcxba a sSgMyNghar or Inter prim Reasoned address: 41 Toner ML London K3N4HA 

Haa If Huy had not hem. This it not m m onuwn da flonor Raglto: 1322693, VWTIlo: 53* 7133 62 

btformar fan maided on Wifomnnay be Md by Hambro during Ltd and olhy compute within its Group In their m r n p u ferrecadi. 


exposed. HSBC lost 16p to 
469p, Standard Chartered 
I4p to S28p and Cable & 
Wireless eased 4p to 64 6p. 

Glaxo Holdings surged 36p 
to 823p, on volume of 7.6 
million shares, after the US 
Food and Drug Administra- 
tion issued an “approvable” 
letter for Imigran. the group’s 
migraine treatment, known in 
America as Imitrex. The letter 
means the medicine should 
get final approval soon. 

Andrew Porter, of Nikko, 
said: "It’s good news, al- 
though it has taken a little 
longer than expected. This is 
one of Glaxo's most exciting 
products. The market is pleas- 


FT-A All-Share index from 
next year. 

The beleaguered motor in- 
dustry received a fillip from 
news that new car sales rose by 
6 JL per cent last month, boost- 
ed by last month’s abolition of 
the special car tax. although 
sales tor the first 1 1 months of 
1992 were down 1.3 percent 

November's sales were 
viewed positively, helping Lex 
Service add 12p to 253p. T 
Cowie lp to 140p, European 
Motor 2p to 79p and Jessups 
2p to 65p. 

WiHiam Baud slipped 1 Ip 
to 207p after reports that 
James Capel had trimmed its 
profit forecast. Unilever did 
1 4p to £1052 as some traders 
switched into the NV, the 
Dutch quoted shares, for cur- 
rency reasons. 

Resort Hotels plunged 8p 
to 16p, although the shares 
recovered to close at 19p after 
tiie company issued a state- 
ment to the Stodr Exchange 
saying that it was not aware of 
any reason tor the falL 

MehiOe Group was a late 
casualty, sliding from an over- 
night level of 1 lp to just 6p 
after it revealed a slump in 
profits and passed its 
dividend. 


RISES: 

liberty Life 755p(+l3p) 

Boosey Hwks 92Qp (+10p) 

Lex Service 253p (+12p) 

Sappi — 489p(+14p) 

ADT 500p (+10p) 

Barbour Index 230p (+10p) 

Brit Data Mgt — 170p (+10p) 

J Mertzies 459p (+13pj 

Bee Data PTC 510p (+25p) 

Geest 304p (+11p) 

Antofagasta 673p (+23p) 

Sectri^iard 150p (+9p) 

FALLS: 

HSBC 469p (-16pj 

Standard Chart 528p(-14p) 

Slebe 379p (-Up) 

SwePacfcA 1 225p(-11p) 

Wetr 567p (~10p) 

Euro Disney 683p (-10p) 

P&O Did 460p(-18p) 

Closing Prices Page 25 


BP- 


Mm i B RHMi 

tn&Dd Sicd 
lour cot 
IBM 

tod Fbr a Ft 
Bm Piper 
Hina trtrr VR 
jtmn p a— 
X Kui 



Philip Pangalos 


BTRW&rranls 1997 113^ 

crltcbJey Group (22Q 237 

Foreign A Col PEP InvTst 102 
Jos Holdings Capital 33 
Jos Holdings income 89 
Jos Zero Div Pf 109 

Second Consolidated Tst 99 
Tepnel Diagnostics (120) 194 
wetherspoon (U3) (160) 175 
RIGHTS ISSUES 
Prime People n/p (4'4 ** 


CnUwtYdirt 
BrtgBHtKhJer 
UBr CEH) 

TlmHwi me 
UN Briefing 

LbKQla Nat 
Lteam 

|h flaftwyne 

Zjxttteetf Carp 
unUm ht 
MQ caamnn 


UVUn 


McOameU D 
MoCasr HU 

Mead cup 

Metro* 
Mdtoa Bk 
MeMDe Cora 
Mo* UK 
Menu imkA 
Ubmem Mine 
MODS carp 


Mmgxs pn 
Mouroti me 
WflMedka] 
Nad Serai 
Nad sente tod 
I tartar tat 
NSD Baneocp 
NYTtewA 
HewinoK Mag 
Ma| Motawk 
WteB 

NL Indunte 


Noetott Sttan 
NUnAaK fwt 
NonraUCOip 
Nfoex cup 

Ocddenral K 
rmai imiwi 


36 3V. 

w. <s>, 
31*. SV. 
30 29>. 

sr. ss*. 

48 «■ 

3ft 3ft 
53V 5Tj 
73% 72% 
J3 1 . 33% 
45V 44 

9% 9% 

31% 31% 
4£F. <2% 

42% 42 
33% m 
51% 90% 
W 35% 
31% 30% 
96% 96% 
82% 81% 
MV eos 
33% 32% 

I 111% U». 
57% 58 
34% 33% 
57% 58% 
59% 59% 
25% 26% 
47 4S% 

32 m 

J7S 37% 
27% 27% 
1S% 19, 

29 29% 

43 43 

99. 58% 
46% 46% 
64 63% 

42% 43% 
63 61 

10 % 10 % 
87 67V 

55% 55% 
44% 44% 

». n 

71% 71% 
64% 64% 
21% Zl% 
30% 31% 
21% av 
IS 1 . 77% 
67 67V 

111% J»% 
63% 64% 
18% 18% 
50% 50% 
25% 25% 
68 % « 

43 43% 

59% 59% 
60 80 
63% 63% 
27% 28 
77% 76% 
72 71% 

42% 42% 
«% 41 
51% 51% 
58% 59% 
38% 37% 
20 % 20 % 
91% 92% 
65% 65% 
28% 29% 
71 71% 

15% 15% 
33’. 33V 
49% 49 
46% 46% 
60% 60% 
40% 40% 
96% 96% 
4% 48% 
52% 52% 
45% 45% 
61% 61 
roi% ion 

59% 99% 
55% 55% 
40% 40% 
BK. 107. 
12% Lfc 
13V 12% 

25% 25% 
2 % 2 
28% 29% 
27V Zft 
39 39% 

18% 19 
84V 83% 

5 4% 

37% 38% 
62% 62% 
43% 43 
42% 42% 
83 82% 

17*. |?% 

22 21V ■ 


tog mantas 


23% 

Z3% 

39% 

39% 

32% 

MV 

39% 

40% 

48% 

48% 

5T, 

53% 

3% 

28% 

69 

49% 

46% 

46% 

41% 

44% 

45% 

48% 

12% 

C% 

53% 

53% 

12% 

73% 

26 

28% 

55% 

ST, 

82% 

a 

33 

33 

56% 

54% 

75*. 

75% 

37% 

37% 

U*i 

13% 

61 

sr. 

43% 

45% 

67 

67 

60% 

59% 

37% 

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4 Jjd 


























21 


• TIPS AND THE TAXMAN 22 

• STORM INSURANCE 22 

• BANK COMPLAINTS 23 

• LETTERS 24 


WEEKEND MONEY 


Edited by Lindsay Cook 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


T he collective financial om- 
budsmen are doing a great 
job when their paymasters let 
inem. This week, it was the turn of 
the banking ombudsman to report a 
60 per cent increase in complaints It 
could have been more if the banks 
did not, at the end of their com- 
plaints procedures, drag their feet in 
issuing deadlock letters that are 
necessary for customers to take their 
cases to the ombudsman. 

Laurence Shurman, the banking 
ombudsman, has implemented a 
pilot scheme to tiy to speed com- 
plaints to his office. He argues that it 
is in banks’ interest to get them 
resolved quickly. Too often, com- 
plaints linger in branch or regional 
offices, as staff do not want head 
office to learn how many unhappy 
customers they have. 

In many cases, the account hold- 
er’s grievance is ill-founded and the 
ombudsman’s office says much the 
same as the bank; but it is believed as 
an independent voice. It might also 
put the matter differently. Too often, 
staff tell customers “we have always 
done it this way”, or even “we have 


Banks drag feet on complaints 


had lots of complaints about this”, 
without explaining that the terms 
and conditions of the account are 
binding and common to all banks. 

The banks are not alone in 
delaying tactics. Weekend Money 
hears from many exasperated cus- 
tomers of insurance companies 
whose first letters to head office 
receive replies from assistant general 
managers but who find that sub- 
sequent correspondence comes from 
more junior members of staff. They 
therefore get further and further 
from the deadlock letters that enable 
their cases to be heard by the 
insurance ombudsman. 

Many cases are ruled to be outside 
the ombudsmen’s jurisdiction. The 
largest number of banking com- 
plaints concerned interest and 
chafes, but few of these cases 
received a full examination, because 
it is up to the banks ft) take 
commercial derisions on the rates 



ed^/tMENTpT 


Lindsay Cook 

WEEKEND MONEY EDITOR 


they charge or pay, provided they do 
not change the terms and conditions 
of an account too radically without 
proper notice. 

Of the cases that the ombudsmen 
examine fully, a third on average 
result in compensation. Financial 
institutions should be thankful that 
there are professional offices to deal 
with their disenchanted customers, 
whose cases would dog up much 
executive time. 

The fact that more and more 
customers are becoming aware of 
the ombudsmen’s existence is good 
news. It gives them confidence that if 


anything serious should go wrong, 
there is a way or resolving it without 
resorting to die courts. 

Buyers beware 

A lesson was leamt this week 
by investors in the Birming- 
ham Capital Trust that 
should be noted by all other savers. 
Guarantees are only as good as die 
company or organisation malting 
them. 

The small private bank has writ- 
ten to savers who put money into its 
fixed-rate, tax-exempt special sav- 


ings account, expecting to get 12 per 
cent gross for five years, that the ac- 
count is to be dosed at the end of the 
year after discussions with the Bank 
of England. They will have to trans- 
fer to another Tessa with a lower rate 
of interest If they do not do so, they 
will lose the tax benefits of the ac- 
count as well. 

The Birmingham bank blamed 
the economic dimate, which has re- 
sulted in an erosion of its capital 
base. Those who put their money 
with the bank were not greedy 
because they opted for a 12 per cent 
guarantee; variable rate accounts 

were offering more than 15 percent 
when they were launched at die 
beginning of last year, plus the 
chance of final bonuses. 

The Birmingham case is a timely 
reminder, for the market is awash 
with guaranteed products of all de- 
scriptions, whether they be business 
expansion schemes with guaranteed 


exits, or bonds investing in equities 
guaranteeing that whatever hap- 
pens in the market capital is secure. 

Investors should check the status 
of anyone offering an investment 
guarantee just as they would a firm 
guaranteeing damp-proofing work. 
If the company fails, so does the 
guarantee in most cases. Or if com- 
panies’ market hopes are not re- 
alised, they can go back on their 
word 

Those who look first to tax-eff- 
iciency when investing can also 
come unstuck, as Lancashire & York- 
shire Assurance Society’s current de- 
bacle over unwise investment in 
property demonstrates. Some 
40,000 investors were told, when 
they invested in its capital secure 
fond, that properly was excluded 
from the portfolio of the tax-free 
investment. 

Now they find that the friendly 
society did invest in property and has 
made substantial losses. Who will 
pay remains to be seen but it is only a 
question of whether the grief is 
spread across all the society’s inves- 
tors or only those in the fond. 


Christmas clampdown 
on credit card fraud 


By Lindsay Cook 

MONEY EDITOR 

CREDIT card fraudsters were 
given notice this week that the 
pickings will not be so easy this 
Christmas. Bardaycard has 
stepped up its efforts to defeat 
the fraudulent use of cards 
and by the end of the year will 
have given away about £4 
million in tax-free bonuses to 
sales staff who retain stolen or 
wildly overspent cards. 

This month, the credit 
card’s fraud referral unit ex- 
pects to be responsible for 300 
arrests and recover more than 
2,500 stolen cards. This will 
be a small proportion of the 

2.000 cards expected to be lost 
or stolen every day during the 
run up to Christmas. On 
average one in ten of the cards 
is used fraudulently. 

Bardaycard expects its 
fraud bili to be reduced this 
year from last year’s £36 mil- 
lion total. This is largely due to 
a reduction in the limits over 
which sales assistants have to 
telephone Bardaycard for au- 
thorisation or an 'electronic 
authorisation is given by the 
card being swiped through a 
machine. On the last Saturday 
before Christmas, the credit 
card company expects to give 

100.000 telephone authori- 
sations and 700.000 electron- 
ic ones. 

This should detea stolen or 
missing cards already report- 
ed. if the thief goes on a spree. 
The company’s Fraudwaich 
computer system often finds 
out when cards are stolen 
before the customer re alises 
they are missing. The system 
analyses spending patterns 
and when a card begins to be 
used in an unusual way one of 
the Fraudwatch team tele- 
phones the cardholder to 
check that he or she is making 
the purchases. About 30.000 
customers have been contact- 
ed since the system went 
national last year and more 
than 2.000 have found that 
their cards were missing. 

Barry Fergus, project direc- 
tor. fraud control, said: “Most 
cardholders are pleased that 
we are taking so much trouble. 
We have only had one dial 
complained saying that it was 
an infringement of their 
liberties." 

The system has to be modi- 
fied a little at Christmas 
because everyone’s spending 
pattern changes. Credit card 
purchases of vine and spirits 
increases by 50 per cent while 
sales of jewellery double and 
petrol is reduced. 

When a card, listed as 
stolen, seeks authorisation the 



Card watch: stafFat the Bardaycard centre in Wavertree, Liverpool track purchases 


sales assistant is asked to 
retain the card and on some 
occasions to engage die cus- 
tomer in conversation to give 
the police time to arrive. 

The reward for a stolen card 
is £50. Bardaycard pays the 
tax for the sales assistant One 
sales assistant has received so 
many £50s that she has 
bought a car with the 
proceeds. 

Professional thieves learn 
fast where they may be caught 
and some of the large new out- 
of-town shopping malls are 
finding that fraudsters are 
moving to them from inner 
cities. Liverpool still tops die 
credit card baud league, ac- 
cording to Baidaycaid. 

The number of cards inter- 
cepted before the customer 
receives them has fallen since 
large numbers have been de- 
livered by security customers 
or to branches for customers to 
coll ed- This now accounts for 
20 per cent of fraud. A fast 
growing, though as yet small 
category, are counterfeit cards. 


These account for 6 per cent of 
fraudulent purchases. They 
often do not have a magnetic 
stripe and cannot be used in 
electronic machines. 

Credit cardholders are told 
to report die loss of a card im- 
mediately and to keep die card 
number and the telephone 
number of the company to 
hand. It is no use al home if it 
takes two hours to get there. 

Statements should be 
checked carefully as should 
credit card vouchers. Never 
sign an open voucher except 
for car hire or in hotels, where 
the card is used as a guarantee 
of payment When the bill is 
finally paid the amount 
should be checked. 

When abroad die card 
should not be let out of the 
customer's sight In restau- 
rants. the plastic imprinter 
should be brought to the table 
or the cardholder should fol- 
low die waiter to the t£CL 

Stores keen to reduce the 
amount of cash in their tills 
are encouraging debit card 


customers to take cash as well 
as their shopping. This cash- 
back facility started in super- 
markets in America, was first 
used in garages in this country 
and now is available in supo*- 
maikets and other shops with 
large cash sales. 

Lloyds said a 1 0 per cent in- 
crease in fraud or attempted 
fraudulent use of cards was 
likely over Christmas. At the 
same time, h was expecting a 
rise of up to 25 per cent in 
spending. However, people 
should not get carried away 
and exceed their credit limit 
Instead they should go out 
with a dear idea of what they 
want to spend on each person, 
the bank said. Cardholders 
can find out how much credit 
they have left by looking at the 
bottom of their statement 
Alternatively, they can ring up 
and find out. People should 
also make sure they make at 
least the minimum repayment 
reqnired on their bill over the 
Christmas period otherwise 
the card might be blocked. 


Saying that won’t do nicely 


whose Bardaycard apptica- 
■ rejected are getting fuller 
[>ns as to why they failed to pass 

id a chance to try again, if they 

ly more information (Lindsay 

*est card issuer, with more than 
'customers, felt that its rather 



ruuiv. a - — ; - - , 

it at the end of October, it 
ing a series of new letters ex- 
fry applicants had been turned 
far. 1,200 of those refused a 
been given an indication where 
m might lie and about 12 per 
supplied more information to 
eir applications, 
this rear, the Office of Fair 

recommended that banks 
e reasons for declining apphea- 
ingle. director, risk manage- 
Bardaycard. said: "On moral 
vc deckled we should tiy to 

jflt" 

tie now four different five- 
i letters that are bdngsentro 
xxssful applicants. The fist 
rredit scoring and points out 
no individual factor leads to 
m the questions about residen- 


tial status and years at an address 
lowered the overall seme of the applicant 
Mr Ingle expkdned that tenants had a 
different risk rating from owner-occupi- 
ers and tenants in furnished homes were 
different from those in unfurnished 
property. 

Marital status and age can lower the 
overall score for applicants. Mr Ingle 
said: “There are different weightings for 
married, single and divorced applicants.” 
The young have a different weighting 
from older people. "We do not profit- 
score and decline older people because 
we think they will not use their cards.” 

Those people rejected because insuffi- 
cient or adverse information has come 
from their bank or building society re- 
ceive the third letter. This may be sent if 
they hank outside Barclays and their 
bank refuses to give a reference. “While 
some could be good customers, we can- 
not get information on them. Others may 
have an appalling financial history. This 

is the letter that we have had a handful of 

problems with and will probably revise 
it” 

Currently, it says that details of the 
length of time the customer has had a 
bank account the type of customer rela- 
tionship and the manner in which the 


account is conducted could have lowered 
the overall score. The last letter refers to 
employment details including the nature 
of the job and time al work. "Those who 
have not got a job are in a generally high- 
er risk category than those in regularly 
paid work. We tend to classify house- 
wives as homemakers rather than unem- 
ployed. Often additional information is 
helpful for applicants initially declined.” 

Those initially tamed down are asked 
for their partner's annual income before 
tax. their mortgage or rent payments, 
and other credit payments. People who 
are turned down because something 
adverse is on the records of credit 
reference agencies can find out what is 
held on them by writing to the agency 
concerned and paying £1. Any incorrect 
information should be changed- 

Credit card issuers are turning down 
the majority of applications now. They 
are cautious about bad debt and people 
over-extending themselves. Uoyds Bank 
will not issue cards to non-customers. 

Some peo pie who are refused cards 
suspect it is because they have always 
paid off existing card bills izz fidL 
Bardaycard says tins is never the case. 
There will be other reasons that the new 
letters should mrfifat* 




Second holders at 
risk over claims 
for compensation 


MILLIONS of cardholders 
are not legally eligible for 
compensation if their Christ- 
mas purchases by card turn 
out to be defective, and could 
be the first to suffer if there is a 
dispute among banks as to 
who should pay out the Law 
Society said this week. 

Those buying expensive 
presents or booking holidays 
over Christmas with a credit 
card wifi normally be protect- 
ed under the Consumer Credit 
Act 1974 if the presents turn 
out to be defective or an airline 
or lour operator goes under. 
Under the act, cardholders 
can recover the cost of any 
purchase between £100 and 
£30.000 from the card issuer. 
Banks are bracing themselves 
for the annual onslaught on 
their card handling systems, 
expecting a rush of card 
purchases in the run-up to 
Christmas. 

However, the Law Society 
said the act was in need of 
“urgent reform” because it 
was not dear whether the 
protection people think they 
have under the Consumer 
Credit Act exists. One of the 
most significant omissions 


under the aa is second card 
holders, who have no legal 
right to a payout Second 
cardholders are not liable for 
debts run up on the card and 
card issuers only have an 
obligation under the act to the 
debtor, who is considered to be 
the first named cardholder. 

These people have to rdy on 
the banks’ goodwill to pay out 
voluntarily. All the big banks 
say they will do so, but Charles 
Maggs, secretary to tire con- 
sumer and commercial law 
committee at the Law Society, 
said: "It is open to the banks to 
change their polity. If there is 
no legal obligation to pay, why 
should they? The law should 
give cardholders the protec- 
tion they think they have.” 

Those not legally covered 
are the most vulnerable if 


banks dispute claims for com- 
pensation. Credit-card use has 
become more complex since 
the act was drafted and many 
transactions involve two card 
issuers. Typically, one issuer 
wifi handle all a retailer's 
transactions but this may not 
be the same issuer of the 
customer's card. This leaves 
the way open for banks to 
argue about who is responsi- 
ble for paying compensation. 

Lawyers and banks still can- 
not agree on whether the aa 
covers cardholders’ purchases 
abroad. The Banking Om- 
budsman said in his report 
this week that he believed 
cardholders were not covered 
abroad “although the position 
is not entirely dear from 
doubt”. Mr Maggs could not 
see any "geographical limita- 


tion" in the wording of the act, 
however. The Office of Fair 
Trading shares this view. 
Banks say they will normally 
not pay out for cards used 
abroad. 

The need to darify such grey 
areas has united the Law Soc- 
iety. oonsumer groups and the 
banks in an unlikely alliance. 
Jean Eaglesham. head of 
money policy at the Consum- 
ers' Association, said: "We 
have been worried about this 
for a while. It is a valuable 
protection but clarification 
would remove anomalies ” 

Lloyds and NatWest said 
clarification would be "help- 
ful”. Those with Uoyds Visa 
debit cards are the only debit 
cardholders to be covered 
under the act Holders of 
Uoyds Gold cards who use 
their cards anywhere in the 
world also have 90 days' 
purchase protection. 

■ Bardaycard offers protec- 
tion for 1 00 days on items over 
£50 hot covered by household 
insurance. The number of 
claims increases fay 50 percent 
in December. . 

Sara McConnell 



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Tips of the job are a taxable perk 


ByLizDoian 


TAXI drivers, questioned 
about whether they declare all 
their tips to die Inland 
Revenue, are likely to change 
the subject with alacrity, 
pausing only to mention just 
how badly business has fallen 
recently. Few. if any. mil give 
a frank account of whether the 
full amount of income derived 
from tipping ever finds its way 
on to their tax form. 

Officially, no taxi driver can 
dodge die system. A licensed 
Taxi Drivers’ Association 
spokesman said: “The tax 
man is now very good at 
dealing with the Mack 
economy. Years ago, the 
situation was very different 
But now. taxi drivers have to 
pay the foil amount. 

“I would say the situation is 
now skewed m favour of die 
Revenue. For instance, people 
who work less hours because 
of the recession, or have gone 
into semi-retirement. are often 
assessed as though they are 
stQl working a foil week.” 

He refused to dismiss as 
paranoia Haimc that the 
Revenue employs former taxi 
drivers as undercover agents 
to assess drivers' true incomes. 

However, an accountant 
who numbers several taxi 
drivers among his diems, tdls 
a different story. M A cab driver 
can only be assessed on the 
information he is prepared to 
give. The Inland Revenueuses 


various formulae when 
estimating his likely income, 
but they have no way of 
knowing exactly how much he 
has earned.” 

This Is because each driver 
is responsible for keeping his 
awn records, based on the 
daily total recorded on his 
dock. It is not possible for an 
outride authority to check dial 
the records are based on an 
accurate daily reading, the 
accountant said. 

The Inland Revenue’s 
estimates depend primarily on 
the amount of relief claimed 
for fuel expenses. Calculations 
are then made using a 
complicated formula derived 
from years of experience in 
dealing with taxi drivers’ tax 
assessments. 

When preparing estimates, 
die Inland Revenue adds 10 
E>er cent of basic turnover for 
tips, and a further 5 per cent 
for additional charges for 
luggage and journeys that 
involve more than one 
passenger. 

Although he bad no 
concrete evidence, the 
accountant said there was 
probably a case to be made for 
reducing die assumption for 
tips to 7.5 per cent, or even 5 
per cent of turnover because 
people tend to tip less in a 
recession. 

The Inland Revenue was 
not prepared to discuss foe 



existence of set formulae. A 
spokesman said: “We have to 
proceed on the assumption 
that parties are honest and do 
declare their full income. 
Some people do escape the 
net. of course, but they run the 
risk of being caught; which 
will mean having to pay 
penalties such as fines and 
interest on the unpaid tax 


from die date on which it was 
due.” 

Penalties charged can be as 
much as twice the unpaid tax. 
but they depend on the gravity 
of die offence and the amount 
of co-operation shown when 
the tax dodger is finally 
brought to book. 

Restaurant workers whose 
employers operate a tip 








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pooling system — when tips 
are collected centrally and 
shared out among staff — 
should have less opportunity 
of hiding earnings man those 
who are allowed to keep 
individual tips. This is because 
tips shared out by employees 
must be added to their basic 
earnings and thus channelled 
through the normal pay as you 


earn system. When tips are 
paid cash in hand, there is no 
official way of checking. 

The Inland Revenue may 
deride to pursue an individual 

if it suspects tips have not been 
declared, but this normally 
depends on the likely wealth of 

the restaurant's clientele. 

However, many restaurant 
workers never see the tips they 
have earned. There is no legal 
requirement for employers to 
pass on money added to the 

bffi Ity unsuspecting custoznen 
and. according to estimates 
made by foe General Union, 
the GMB, fewer than half of 
all restaurant workers receive 
more than their basic wages. 

A GMB spokesman said 
foal tins sad state of affaire » 
could easily have deteriorated. * 
further in the recession, 
although he had no hard 
evidence tiiat this was the case. 

Tipping is not the only 
additional income that attracts 
tax 

While most people are 
aware of taxable perks such as 
company cars, they may be 
surprised to learn that the 
firm's Christinas party, or 
annual dinner dance, may 
also land them with a tax ML 

Events provided for large 
sections of the staff that cost 
more than £50 a head will 
result in an extra deduction 
from individual salaries. If the 
value of the perk goes above 
the £50 limit, tax is charged on 
foe full amount. ^ 


Insurers assess cost 
of stormy weather 


DRAMATIC television, and 
press pictures of flooded vil- 
lage streets and watedogged 
vehicles have given the im- 
pression that insurers will fare 
massive daims for flood dam- 
age (Liz Dolan writes). Al- 
though reports of devastation 
in Wales and foe West Coun- 
try have led to insurance 
company shares being 
marked down on foe stock 
market, the companies appear 
to be taking a more sanguine 
view. Most of foe flooding has 
occurred over pastureland 
which, white bad news for rab- 
bits and field moles, is unlikely 
to affecr many humans. 

Mike Dundeidale. manag- 
ing director of Robins, Davies 
& Ware, a West Country loss 
adjuster, said: “We're not 
expecting to be asked to inves- 
tigate a huge amount of 
claims. The Swansea office is a 
bit busy and the Taunton 
office is seeing some business, 
but, for the most part the 
floods really didn't happen as 
far as we're concerned." 

A spokesman for Royal In- 
surance agreed: “It’s really not 
a problem. Obviously it's very 
bad news Cor some of our 
clients, but the costto us is only 
likely to be about the same as 
you might expect after a windy 
night” It was too early to 
estimate how much Royal 
would have to payout he said. 

Individual daims far flood- 
ing tend to be quite expensive, 
but they are often delayed for 
some time, as a proper assess- 
ment is impossible until foe 
property has dried out com- 
pletely. Loss adjusters might 
advise waiting to see whether a 
carpet, for instance, or wall. 


that appears to have been 
badly affected when sopping 
wet. improves enough to sal- 
vage later on, foe spokesman 
said. 

Under Royal’s baste house- 
hold polity, families are re- 
housed until their homes 
become habitable once more. 
Royal takes responsibility for 
drying out foe property, with 
the use of aids such as industri- 
al heaters. “It is only then that 
we can even start to look at a 
claim." 

Steve Turner, superintend- 
ent household, at/ Sun Alli- 
ance, said: “If s early days yet 
Sometimes people don't con- 
tact us for a long time, so we 
cant be sure how many daims 
we’re going to get However, 
foe overall view is that the 
damage is not as expensive as 
was feared earlier in the 
week." He said that one loss 
adjuster in the South East had 
told him he was inundated 
with work, but “he may be 
unusual" . 

People in flooded areas are 
advised to contact insurers at 
once so that damage limita- 
tion can begin. The Associ- 
ation of British Insurers ad- 
vises taking emergency ' pre- 
cautions as soon as possible. It 
says: “Don’t use gas or electric- 
ity untQ you’re told ifs safe to 
do so. Wherever possible, keep 
doors and windows open and 
lift floorboards to aid foe dry- 
ing process. Don't redecorate 
too early and make sure areas 
under suspended floorboards 
have dried out thoroughly, or 
you may get dry rot later on.” 

Premiums are unlikely to be 
affected unless foe situation 
worsened considerably. 


Tax help put on video 


By Sara McConnell 


THE Inland Revenue has 
produced a free video and 
booklet for people about to 
start up in business. 

The video outlines seven 
steps self-employed people 
need to take if they are not to 
fail foul of the taxman and is 
the first in what the Revenue 
bopes will become a series on 
different aspects of foe tax 
system. 

S eft-employed people and 
tax officers featured in the 
video. Getting tax right from 
the start, stress that people 
setting up on their own should 
contact the local tax office 
before starting to trade. 

Keeping a dear record of 
business receipts and earnings 
and day-to-day expenditure 
once the business has started is 
vitaL The booklet with foe 
video lists rent, heat, light and 
telephone, insurance, foe costs 


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of ninning the car. printing, 
stationery and staff wages as 
some of the expenses that can 
be set against tax. 

Those who employ staff are 
responsible for deducting tax 
under foe pay as you earn 
system and paying it to the 
Revenue. At the end of each 
year, accounts for the business 
must be filed with foe Reve- 
nue, otherwise an estimated 
assessment will be made. The 
Revenue says those with a 
turnover of less than El 5,000 
just have to supply a threelme 
account showing total turn- 
over. total business expenses 
and net profit 

The video is available from ) 
the Revenue's 400 tax enquiry 
offices. 


Jl 


1 















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V ill i ^ 


P e »'k 


isoss o: 

LV 'veathf 


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S* E TIMES SATURDAY DRCFIUred 5 , 992 


WtUKLINJJMUiSllI 


Bank fees a nd interest charges top list of complaints to ombudsman 

Loans should cany a health warning 

BvUndsayCook • • - ** O 


Bv LtndsayCook 
money editor 

BANKS should put limits on 
guarantees for loans made by 
mouses, business partners or 
parents. Laurence Shurman, 
tie banking ombudsman, 
s«d when publishing his an- 
rual report 

He has dealt with several 
cases where a wife has acted as 
guarantor and allowed the 
hmfly home to be secured on 
1 business loan for her hus- 
land. The loan was small and 
here “was a spirit of natural 
ove and affection". By ihe 
time the cases reach the om- 
budsman, the couple have 
often split up and the amount 
owed is much larger. 

In other cases reported to 
yeekend Money, parents act 
3jS guarantors for one loan and 
are surprised when their child- 
r n take on subsequent loans 
tflat the parents are expected 
u honour. ‘'There should 
a vays be a health warning for 
a y guaranior staring what 
t! e maximum liability will 
b the ombudsman said. 

During the year to end- 
Sptember. the number of 
c mplaints received by his 
c lice rose by 60 per cent to 
rore than 10,000. Those 
j xjut charges and interest 
t pped the list at 1.939 — al- 
i ough most of these were be- 
3 >nd the ombudsman's juris- 
( iction. Of those cases fully in- 
stigated, more than a third 
incemed cash dispensers. 

Mr Shurman believes that 
te banking code of practice, 
itroduced in March, will re- 
uce the number of problems 
i this area. The code limits 
iss to £50 when a card is used 
y a third party without the 
oldehs consent, unless he or 
he has been grossly negli- 
:ent However, grossly negli- 
ent behaviour is not speci- 
fied. Writing the personal i- 
aentifi cation number on the 


DSdUMCWEELAWCe 



Fair play: Laurence Shurman, left, with Dame Mary Donaldson, chairman of the office of the banking ombudsman 


card is obviously asking for 
trouble. 

In one case decided by the 
office since the code was 
introduced, Mr Shurman 
found for the customer and 
told the bank that he expected 
it to use the case as guidance in 
future cases. 

Banks had feared a flood of 
false claims after the code 
came in and some dubbed it a 
fraudster’s charter. They 
believe that the computers 
operating the cash dispensers 
cannot be activated without a 
correct personal identification 
number and if a third party 
has used one the customer 
must have been negligent. 

Lloyds Bank said that it 
referred the case to the om- 
budsman because it wanted 


guidance on what he regarded 
as gross negligence. 

Mr Shumian said that it 
was possible for numbers to be 
seen by third parties. Some 
machines are set low down, 
making it easy for anyone in 
the queue to observe the 
number. Others are posi- 
tioned in such a way that the 
customer has to move to one 
side to be able to see the 
instructions in bright sunlight 

The ombudsinan said he 
had found plenty of evidence 
of fraud. Often it involved 
someone known to the com- 
plainant “Cases have hap- 
pened through other sources 
inside the banks and from 
other third party means." 

In one case, a bank did not 
act quiddy enough to cancel a 


Friendly society may 
have to impose levy 


By Sara McConnell 


Holders of policies at die 

cashire & Yorkshire Assur- 
es Society, die friendly sod- 
that this week suspended 
business, may have to pay 
evy to cover a £4 million loss 
[stained by the society on 
fopeny investments. 

The society Slid a levy was 
ie option being considered. 

could be in the order of 
5 per cent of the policy’s 
ue for each of the society's 
.000 policies in force. 

| The vast majority of these 
; slides, some 70,000. had 
i tposure to property invest- 
lents, although nearly 
0.000 of the members had 
ndorsements on theirpolides 
tat specified contributions 
tould not be invested in 
] roperty. 

Since 1989, these invest- 
ents have been held in the 
ital Secure Board. The 
v3ue of the property portfolio 
£2.5 million, less than 


half the £6.8 mfllion it had cost 
to buy. 

The society is to ask the 
High Court to decide whether 
compensation should be paid 
and if so. where the payout 
should come from. The appli- 
cation to court is likely to be 
filed in the new year. Any levy 
on policyholders would de- 
pend bn the couifs decision. 

Those who had sustained 
losses could find themselves 
paying a levy to help fund 
their own compensation. Poli- 
cyholders will not be able to 
apply for compensation to die 
Policyholders’ Protection 
Board, because this pays out 
only if societies go under. 
There is no question at the 
moment of this happening in 
Lancashire & Yorkshire's case. 

Payouts on maturing poli- 
cies will continue in the nor- 
mal way. The price of the units 
has already taken the losses 
into account 




. . i 


The more time you spend earning money, the less time 
you have to manage it. Which is especially serious when it 
comes to ptenrrerg for retirement. 

The smple solution te to tadk to an independent financial 
adwser. He or she has a wealth ot financial information on 
tap, which allows you to compare the offerings of various 
companies, under the guidance of an expert. 

Your first consultation with an independent financial 
adviser is usually free, and puts you under no obligation 

whosoever. . _ 

Why not cast an eye over our free ^formation paw 

mssm m p* mssm 

eSJaWsr 


General 

Accident 

changes 

polities 

GENERAL Accident has 
changed its motor policies and 
home insurance tor new cus- 
tomers after canying out ex- 
tensive research on what 
motorists and homeowners 
want (Lindsay Cook writes). 

The MotorOptrons policy 
offers basic comprehensive 
cover throughout Europe and 
allows motorists to decide 
what extras they want These 
include replacement car hire 
at £32. Breakdown assistance, 
provided by Europ Assistance, 
is offered for an extra E49.75 
and legal expenses insurance 
at £10. 

The new policy will also 
have an additional no claims 
bonus for customers who have 
already earned the 60 percent 
discount This will give them a 
total discount of 66 per cent 

The company already offers 
a no daims discount on its 
home policies of up to 25 per 
cent It is now launching a 
bedroom-based policy, but al- 
lowing policyholders to add to 
it where their possessions ex- 
ceed the limits. The premiums 
are based on numbers of 
bedrooms and postcodes, but 
the company is using its 65 
regional offices to improve the 
risk assessments of areas. Sub- 
sidence, for example, is not 
neatly contained within post 
code districts. 

HomeOptions is intended 
to simplify insurance. The 
basic contents policy will offer 
cover for fire, flood and theft 
Customers can add on acci- 
dental damage and cover for 
possessions outside the home. 
The standard excess is £50, 
which means that policyhold- 
ers pay the first £50 of any 
claim- Those who are willing 
to pay the first £250 on a 
buddings policy get a 25 per 
cent discount. With contents 
the disoount is 20 per cent. 
Higher discounts can be 
earned with larger excesses. 

Norwich Union will, from 
next month, offer a 1 0 per cent 
discount for household policy- 
holders who have not made a 
daim for three years. This is in 
addition to the 10 per cent 
discount introduced in July for 
those who have held a policy 
for three consecutive years. 


'.i'.K'VW** 

vim iFJkf rutr*. stwflto Fljwn 

HIH, BrW* 1 »** ***. w «* 

0483 461 461 

ar,sssss 25 ss^-«- 

0, pnm as a res* of rts coupon 




K 


A PENSION 
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1 ■ THE INVESTMENT HOUSE I 


card that was reported stolen. 
The bank said dial £1 50 was 
withdrawn before the theft 
was reported and £500 was 
withdrawn afterwards. As a 
gesture of goodwill, the bank 
credited the customer with 
£325 — half the money lost 
The ombudsman ruled that 
the bank was not entitled to 
enforce its strict contractual 
conditions. The customer's 
loss was reduced to £150. If 
the case had happened after 
the code came into operation, 
the customer might only have 
had £50 to pay. the report said. 

A dispenser's audit trail was 
examined in every disputed 
case. Cash dispenser fraud 
could be reduced by giving 
customers a choice of personal 
identification numbers so they 


could be remembered more 
easily, by limiting the amount 
of cash that can be dispensed, 
monitoring suspicious with- 
drawal patterns and sending 
more frequent statements on 
savings accounts with cash 
cards. With the latter, large 
sums can be withdrawn with- 
out the customer knowing. 

The cost of dosing an ac- 
count is another source of 
contention with customers. In 
one case, a bank had levied 
£1 0 for dosing the account of a 
deceased customer. It was not 
until the solicitor told the bank 
that it had referred the com- 
plaint to the ombudsman that 
a refund was made. 

Mr Shurman said he would 
not back customers who 
claimed the same cost for 


writing letters that the banks 
charged customers. Custom- 
ers might be able to daim thqy 
earned £50 an hour in their 
work, but when they wrote to 
their banks they were not 
working in this capacity. In 
most cases he ruled that the 
time of a customer was worth 
E5 to £10 an hour. 

Time taken off work for 
bank meetings would be paid 
for if the customer lost wages 
because of them. An architect 
who daimed £25,000 for his 
own time in sorting out over- 
payment of interest of El 6,000 
on two property loans was 
paid £500 or 5 Op an hour for 
the time daimed. 

In another case, three sisters 
in their nineties sought advice 
from a bank's financial ser- 
vices adviser. He defrauded 
them of El 2,000. After a long 
delay, the hank repaid the 
£1 2,000. but refused any addi- 
tional compensation. Eventu- 
ally, the bank dedded to pay 
interest of £3.000. £500 for in- 
convenience and distress and 
£750 plus VAT for legal fees. 

A couple whose cheque was 
bounced, preventing them 
from buying a cafe in which 
they were tenants, were 
awarded £27,000 in compen- 
sation. The bank, however, 
took £22,000 of this to cover 
money owed from ihe custom- 
er's business account 
□ The ombudsman may be 
contacted by writing to the 
Office of the Banking Om- 
budsman, Citadel House. 5- 
1 1 Fetter Lane. London EC4A 
1 BR. Complaints should have 
worked their way through the 
bank's complaints procedures 
before being referred. Howev- 
er. if a bank is tardy in 
handling a case, the ombuds- 
man can hurry things along. 
A pilot study is being carnal 
out to see tf the complaints 
procedure can be speeded up. 

Comment page 21 


j. 


Great Central Railway (ffii) PLC - 1992 Share Issue 

SHARE IN THE 
GREAT CENTRAL 
STEAM EXPERIENCE 

Help the GCR to re-create the experience 
of Main Line Railway operation during 
the best years of steam. 

| 

I I would like to join in tfie Great Central Railway steam 

i experience. Please send me your prospectus containing 

i more information about your forthcoming Share Issue. 

I Title (Mr/Mrs/Miss) 

, Name 

l Address 



Postcode. 


TSJ 


Please send this coupon to The Secretary, 
Great Central Railway (1976) PLC, 

Freepost (LE6057) Leicester LEI 7ZH. 

Or Phone (0533) 510101 



Play Footsie 
without getting 


stepped on. 

Share Index Plus. All the benefits of an investment 
on the Stock Exchange, with none of the risks. 


End 

Minimum Guarantee 

Percentage 

of 

of Original Investment 

FT-SE Growth 

Year 

5 





End y| 
of 4. 
Year 

115% of Original 
Investment 

80% of FTSE Rise 

End n 
of M 

Year ^ 

110% of Original 
Investment 

70% of FTSE Rise 

End 

or V 
Year 

105% of Original 
Investment 

60% of FTSE Rise 

End -m 

of 1 
Yfear 

100% of Original 
Investment 

50% of FTSE Rise 


This is a limited offer, on a strictly first come, 
first served basis. OFFER MUST CLOSE 30th DECEMBER 
1992. ALL MONEY RECEIVED PRIOR TO THIS DATE 
WILL ATTRACT A FIXED HIGH RATE OF 8.5% GROSS. 


What is Share Index Plus? 

Share Index Plus is a 5 year investment account where 
the rate of interest paid will be dictated by the 
performance of the stock market. 

As interest rates fall, investors often look elsewhere for 
higher returns. The FT-SE 100 Index, which consists of 
100 of the UK’s top public companies, has GROWN BY 
56.9% SINCE 1st JANUARY 1988. 

Isn’t the Stock Market risky? 

High returns are usually associated with high risks, 
that’s why Share Index Plus has a special range of 
guarantees: 

- you will never get back less than your original 
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- a t the end of 5 years, you will receive your original 
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“ if the FT-SE 100 Index falls or grows very slowly, at 
the end of the 5 year period you will receive interest of 
at least 25% gross. 

What If I want my money back before the end of 
the five year period? 

This is the only product of its type to allow you to close 
your account early and still get a guaranteed return. 

(See table opposite). 

'How an account be opened? 

The minimum balance is ONLY £6,000. Simply complete 
the coupon or call into any Yorkshire Building Society 
branch. If vou require further details, phone free on 
0800 378836. 

&riyt***tiw*»rilH , i«« ,| ciiiiil wlllailiart kv* inlmvnllluulul ■'» \*ur mnlurilt; I U*«l Ynrkshliv I limw. York«iiin> Drive. Unulftrrrl B(X> RULTrlriiliuui-s OCT 7UI7UI. 


I Send tn: Yorkshire BuQding Society (Deporlmwit SIP). FREEPOST. Yorkshire House. Yorkshire I 

' Drive. Bradford. Weal Yorkshire BD1 1BR. l/ffir endow a cheque for £ (minimum ' 

| £50900] mule payable to Yorkshire Building Society In respect of a Share Index Plus account. I 

. NAMES Ttm.512 

ou. mho. mm 



ADDRESS 




1 POSTCODE 

TEL NO. (STD) 


[ SIGNATURE 

DATE OP BIRTH 

1 

I SIGNATURE 

DATE OF BIRTH 

1 

1 



\ 


YORKSHIRE 

Building Society^M 


I Bnr.RU.Tclnilwm,-; 

FT-SEund Fbntxk-arrjolfll Imtlr markaiuiil hi-vEit- lharkioTHir l/nuhiuKlirk Km-Ihui^c- ami lltr Kiuam-ial Ttmr* LhL 










24 WEEKEND MONEY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBERS 1992 


I BRIEFINGS 


National & Provincial Build- 
ing Society is offering its 
lowest mortgage rale since 
1 959 to first-time buyers. TTse 
firet-time buyer guarantee of- 
fers a rate of 5.95 per cent 
until January 1. 1994. This 
applies to loans up to 90 per 
cent of the valuation. On loans 
up to 95 per cent it costs 6.25 
per cent There is a £150 fee 
and N&P buildings and con- 
tents insurance is required. 


□ Holders of shares in the 12 
electricity companies can ex- 
change them tins month for 
shares in Fleming investment 
trusts for a fee of £7.50. 

□ Abbey National has two 
fixed-rate mortgages. The first 
is at 7.2 per cent until April 
1995. and includes two years’ 
free unemployment cover. The 
booking fee is £199 and 
buildings and contents insur- 


ance is required. The second 
has a fixed rate of 8.75 per 
cent until February 28, 1998. 
The booking fee is El 99. 

□ Storehouse is launching a 
lew-cost service for dealings in 
its own shares. Available 
through Cazenove & Co, it 
costs 1 per cent with no mini- 
mum fee. The minimum 
lump sum postal purchase for 
a new investor is £200- 


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IK VMUE Of investment; WJTHW a pee and wt 
INCOME FROM THEM, CAN GO DOWN Ai WILL AS UP 
AND WU M» NOT GET WOt 7 * HJU AMOUNT « 3 U 
MCSIED TAX CONCESSIONS AH NOT GUMANTHD AND 
MAY BE CHANCED AI ANT TIME. IKK VAUiE Wti DEHNO 
ON YOLK MMDUA 1 CNCUM 5 WNCE. MSI KBFOBMANCE 
B NOT A CUDE IO FUTUE RCfUGM* »*E A PROSED 
GROUP UD B AMEAWEE OF MUO AND IAUTCO 







SAVE & 
PROSPER 


THE INVESTMENT HOUSE 


Two sides to 
tax refunds 

From Mr P.A Hollings 
Sir, I read with interest your 
Comment (November 21) on 
the difficulties which tie in the 
way of individuals who wish to 
reclaim income ox deducted 
from interest credited by 
buflding societies. 

My wife is entitled to make 
such a daim. butt, so for. our 
problems have arisen with the 
buflding societies. 1 recently 
rang our local society for a 
certificate of deduction of tax, 
to support a daim by my wife 
for the current year. At first, I 
was given a number of unlike- 
ly reasons why such a certifi- 
cate could not be issued now, 

including a suggestion that 
there were Inland Revenue 
instructions. E refused to ac- 
cept what I was told and was 
promised that the question 
would be attended to. Having 
heard nothing, I made an 
official complaint The second 
paragraph of the letter I 
received in reply suggests that 
the Inland Revenue is indeed 
putting obstacles in the way of 
repayment during a year. No 
wonder individuals are dis- 
couraged from making 
claims. It is within my know- 
ledge that investors are un- 
aware they may make claims. 
Last year. I attempted to 
persuade a couple of societies 
to either issue certificates of 
deduction of tax automatical- 
ly, oral least to bring to notice 



TKe^ SKoult? oy&f teller ^est'erdavj 
if- l post" U~ Tomorrow ,- 

pLl 

07b 1 { 




of members the possibility of 
reclaiming tax overpaid, but 
without any success, so for. Do 
you not agree that societies 
have some responsibility to 
advise members of the entitle- 
ment in this respect? 

Yours faithfully, 

F. A. HOLLINGS, 

2 Davey Close, 

Impington, 

Cambridge. 

From Mrs Audrey Phillips 
Sir, Your comment— “Tax 
claimants need better deal” 
(November 21) — is grossly 
unfair to the Revenue as 
regards repayment of over- 
paid tax in saying “it can take 


Malvern masters 1 case and the use of Hansard by the law lords 


From Mr John Hart 
Sir, Rather naturally I read 
the articles by Undsay Code 
and Sara McConnell on Pep- 
per v. Hart (Weekend Money, 
November 2 8) with more than 
usual interest They were en- 


CONSISTENTLY 
HIGHER 
INTEREST, 
rrs AS SIMPLE 

AS ATB. 

For details of Allied 
Trust Bank's high 
interest accounts calL 

071-6260879 

AT ANY TIME 

^.putting your interest first 

Allied 'final Bank, 

97-101 Crawa Stmt, 
London EC 4 N SAD 


M&G EUROPEAN 
& GENERAL RECORD 



£1,000 Lump Sum 


£40 a month 

Year ended 

Building 

M&G 

Amount 

Building 

M&G 

31st December 

Society 

European & General 

Invested 

Society 

European & General 

24 July 1972 

£1,000 

£1,000 

£40 

£40 

£40 

1972 

1,020 

958 

200 

202 

189 

1973 

1,088 

978 

680 

713 

616 

1974 

1,171 

698 

1,160 

1,267 

804 

1975 

1,257 

944 

1,640 

1,859 

1,606 

1976 

1,347 

878 

2,120 

2,491 

1,923 

1977 

1,443 

952 

2,600 

3,166 

2,555 

1978 

1,537 

1,028 

3,080 

3,871 

3,227 

1979 

1,670 

1,202 

3,560 

4,707 

4,272 

1980 

1,847 

1,364 

4,040 

5,713 

5,321 

1981 

2,021 

1,328 

-4,520 

6,755 

5,628 

1982 

2,203 

1,506 

5,000 

7,865 

6,893 

1983 

2,366 

1,918 

5,480 

8,946 

9,272 

1984 

2,552 

2,346 

5,960 

10,153 

11,839 

1985 

2,779 

3,528 

6,440 

11,557 

18,407 

1986 

2,999 

5,724 

6,920 

12,970 

30,437 

1987 

3,231 

4,672 

7,400 

14,476 

25,201 

1988 

3,462 

5,532 

7,880 

16,010 

30,332 

1989 

3,789 

8,570 

8,360 

18,024 

47,564 

1990 

4,198 

7,090 

8,840 

20,480 

39,744 

1991 

4,552 

7,472 

9,320 

22,709 

42,327 

30 Nov 1992 

4,840* 

8,328 

9,760 

24,601* 

47,610 


i 

l 

i 

l 

I 

I 

i 


Notes: All figures include re-invested income net of basic-rate tax. M&G European & General figures show the return to the investor 
The Building Society figures are based on the average rate of a Building Society Share Account (Source: Central Statistical 
Office - Financial Statistics). The regular savings figures exclude the last payment and all payments apart from the first are 
made on the last business day of the month. 

An investment in M&G European & General of £1,000 on 30th November. 1987 would be worth £1,706 by 30th November 
1992. An investment of £40 a month from 30th November, 1987 (£2,400) would be worth £2,756 by 30th November, 1992 
with net income re-invested. ’‘Estimated using current interest rate levels. Past performance is not necessarily a guide to future per- 
formance. The price of units and the income from them may @3 down as well as up. You may get back less than you invested. 

The M&G European & General Fund is only one of a large range of M&G 
International Funds. For details of M&G’s range please return this coupon to 
The M&G Group, M&G House, Victoria Road, Chelmsford CM1 1FB. 

NO SALESMAN WILL CALL 


Mr/Mrs/ 

Mbs 


INITIALS 


SURNAME 


ADDRESS 


POSTCODE 


TCLA 


OR Telephone (0245) 390 390 (Business Hours). 

Not available to residents of the Republic of Ireland. 

We never make your name and address available to unconnected organisations. We will 
occasionally tell you about othaproducts or services offered by ourselves and associated 
M&G Companies. Tick the box □ rf you would prefer not to receive this information. 
Issued by M&G Securities Limited f member of IMRO and Lautro). 



I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 


UNIT TRUSTS • SAVINGS PLANS 


tirety accurate as for as they 
went but there is one aspect of 
the case that is of real public 
concern, unconnected with its 
implications for personal tax, 
which I have not seen dis- 
cussed anywhere. 

If the House of Lords was 
going to remove its “self- 
imposed blinkers” (our coun- 
sel's phrase) and look into 
Hansard, an averagely literate 
ten-year-old could have seen 
that the Inland Revenue's case 
was doomed. That, no doubt, . 
explains why foe-law' lords 
were treated to the undigni- 
fied spectacle of the Com- 
mons’ senior law officer (for 
the Revenue} urging them to 
pay no attention to what the 
Commons said. The attorney- 
general even argued that foe 
use of Hansard as an aid to 
construing legislation might 
constitute a pinna fade breadi 
of parliamentary privilege: the 
Commons, evidently, didn’t 
mind people reading Han- 
sard as long as they didn't take 
it seriously. As ail foe world 
now knows, their lordships 
did look at Hansard, and the 
Revenue were duty taken to 
the deaners— 7-0 to Malvern. 

Question: in foe face of so 
pellucid a parliamentary in- 


tention, how was it that the 
Revenue not only thought it 
worth while to tiy it on, but 
actually found two courts to 
agree with it? The answer can 
only be incompetent drafting. 
The public at large is entitled 
to assume that all new legisla- 
tion accurately reflects foe 
wishes of Parliament Perhaps 
a system should be devised 
whereby (hose responsible for 
drafting legislation were sur- 
charged, if their incompetence 
.led to prolonged litigation: 
that might concentrate their 
minds somewhat 
I am inclined to discount 
fears foal foe law fords' deci- 
sion will lead to a change in 
the law. only Parliament, not 
foe Revenue, can make laws, 
and their lordships have now 
established that the law is 
what Parliament said it should 
be; and two of them went out 
of their way to stress foe 
absurdity of foe consequences 
that would have flowed from 
the interpretation they 
rejected. 

I am, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN HART 
(Senior Classics Matin). 
Malvern College, Malvern. 
Worcestershire. 


Due notice 

From Professor J. E. Adams 
Sir, Shefla Motley (Letters, 
November 28) is quite wrong. 

Sharing a bathroom or 
kitchen with a landlord does 
indeed prevent the creation of 
an assured tenancy. However, 
it does not affect foe applica- 
tion of the Protection from 
Eviction Act 1977. That 
requires 

(a) a minimum of four weds’ 
notice 

(b) prescribed information (in- 
forming foe tenant of his 
rights) in that notice and 

(3 a court order before retak- 
ing possession. 

Yours faifofulty, 

J. E. ADAMS 
(Professor Emeritus). 
Department of Law, 

Queen Mary and Westfield 
College, University of London, 
Mile End Road, El. 


Loose change 


From Ms Annie Irvine 
Sir. I called in at a London 
branch of foe Midland Bank 
requesting that a £5 note be 
exchanged for smaller coins. 

1 was informed (hat this 
would incur a E3 charge. 

This was later confirmed fry 
Midland Bank’s head office, 
which added that were 1 to 
become a customer of foe 
bank, no charge would be 
made. 

As I’m sure you know, foe 
Midland Bank's advertising 
slogan positions h as The 
Listening Bank, but I fear that 
on this occasion foe gist of my 
reply would have beat lost on 
them. 

Yours faifofulty. 

ANNIE IRVINE, 

Tudor Cottage, 

Ham, Nr Marlborough, 
Wiltshire. 



« 

ACT NOW 




Secure a higher level of income than that available 
from cash by investing through unit trust; in an 
““derbring portfolio of long term bonds. 

Re m ember . 

■ This yield may not be available much longer. 

■ Buddim; Society Instant Access yidds are around 
7% cross - and falling. 

We offer 

■ A high level of Income today and capital 
appreciation, if long term interest rates fall 

M Low charges Inina] . sliding sale down to l 1 ^ 
annua] - Q5Ni 

Guinness Flight Premium fixed Interest Trust ts on 
authorised unit trust which invests predominantly in 
crtporate/sovereiCT Euro-Sterling and Bulldog bonds. 

To find out more return the coupon now. 

CUINNKSS FL.JOHT 


PREMIUM FIXED INTEREST TRUST 


Hewe send me further draft on Guutnea Highi J'lwnrnm 
fined interest Trust 

Rrtura tre Guinness Flight Unit Trust Managers limiieJ, 
5 Gunsford Street, London S£J 2NE. Tefc 071-522 211 1 



TMe 

Address 


Name 


— - . FVwtoJc 

1274/82 

* YiaHkwJ n iMflMatotISm is ll 

Md m BJH hHM uCMpdmm is Mama* a fdfc n 

to Ito nto rtdniMiM (Militant halt otoy Hh Ml n 

da ad fc aot pramt fend fcf Gmmu Hifta Unit T™# linn 
— refOBDMrilMm. 


Post haste from the Revenue 

simflaify pushed ahead? 

In this same prematere 


From Miss G. M. Briggs 
Sir, On November 26 I re- 
ceived a reminder, kindly 
phrased, from HM Collector 
of Taxes about a payment 
falling due shortly. Coming 
from Glasgow by second-dass 
mail it could not have been 
posted later than November 
24, possibty even 23, but foe 
letter itsdf was dated Novem- 
ber 27. Can I trust that the 
payment due date is not 


letter, one is urged to avfcid 
paying by post, if possible, t id 
four preferable ways are s 
gested. Is thi? an affront to K 
postal service or a sad co a- 
mem on things as they are' 
Yours sincerely, 

GRACE M. BRIGGS. 

9 Butier Close, 

Woodstock Road, 

Oxford- 



MWtaax 

40% tavwtontrtR Htflca Contact 


<sei> 


more than a year to get foe 
money". 

I submitted my daim to 
Plymouth 3 and received a 
cheque for the due amount tea 
days later. I would hope foal 
in the interest of fairness you 
would publish this letter. 
Yotns sincerety, 

AUDREY PHILLIPS. 

1 Victoria Court. 

Durdham Park. Bristol. 

□ The delays ntferred to were 
for people whose total over- 
payment is less than £50 who 
nave to wait until the end of 
the tax year in which die 
interest was paid to make the 
daim. 


BANKS 

Ordinary Dap A/c: 
T»**l 0.38 

Rxsd Tsnn DapotoRs: 
Bmpfay. 44 $ 

MS 

“■* ts 

AM 
•US 
AM 
441 


038 030 


1,000 7 day 


4 A 5 

4 A 5 

•US 

<31 

US 

US 

431 


336 

336 

332 
045 

337 
3.75 

333 
045 


£ 530050,000 
2530050/100 
IOQOO-oci rr*x 
10300 -no max 
10 , 000 m max 
10300 -no max 

K/jao-suooo 

25400 - 50.000 


1 

3irfh 
1 mJh 

emttr 
1 mth 
3 mlh 
1 ratti 
amtti 


Q 71 -626 156 
071-626 15 G 
Local Bn-te 

Local Bm: 

0742 52865 
0742 528651 
071-726 1600 
071-725 VDO 


HIGH INTEREST CHEQUE ACCOUNTS 

&■*<!( 

ScafeadMMC 


Primate 
Co-op 

Un 


UowfelflCA 
mill him 


NaMteat 


MCA 


Hoyta Baikal 
Scot Prom A/c 
ISSBanfc 
MCA. 


AM 

5.10 

448 

2500* 

none 

031-442 777? 

2JB3 

2j08 

2.13 

2500* 

nano 

0604 29901 

038 

038 

050 

SOW 

nano 

071828(543 

5.40 

554 

4*43 

2400* 

nano 

080086984 

038 

058 


1400* 

nano 

0272 43372 

2.05 

2.06 

1.85 

2.000* 

nano 

0742 52955 

1J9Q 

151 

141 

500* 

none 

0800200400 

3-00 

948 

2.42 

2400 

none 

031 4550 BBS 

2jQ6 

246 

155 

250W 

none 

071-000 BOO 


BUILDING SOCIETIES 

OrtSoary Sham 
A/c 


Wortha m Bocfc 


Ita y ai ila l lo aB i 


1.75 

1.75 

1 J 78 

1 + none 

— 

it sacs; 

740 

750 

5 . 7 B 

10400 min Postal 


750 

750 

640 

25400 min Postal 

- 

529 

559 

453 

4040011*1 aodey 

i 

044 

Ek 44 

455 

25400 mtn 90 day 

— ■ ■ 

758 

OR 

758 

850 

60400 n* 1 year 

r 

750 

750 

640 

25400 into Postal 

- 

656 

556 

4.77 

25400 into 30 day 

■ 

658 

658 

5.10 

10400 min 60 day 

— 

650 

650 

558 

20400 n*i 90 day 

— ■ - 

750 

750 

653 

50 . 000 mki 1 year 

— 


CPwplad by OBw da Vara Mon o yaw- on on 40* grastortatofttottoto 

NATIONAL SAVINGS 
OnSnryA/C 

RNNuMniWr 


FM Opt Bondi: 
4flb laana Cart* 
Van* Phi* 
Chfc u m'i Bonctt 
Gan Eat Mat 
Cfcpkaf Bonn: 


540 

3.75 

340 

5-10400 

655 

458 

3.75 

6-25400 

840 

840 

450 

2400 - 50.000 

650 

850 

550 

1.000550400 

6.75 

5.75 

5.75 

100 - 5,000 

5.75 

5.75 

5.75 

2 tM 0 Un*i 

755 

755 

755 


3 . 7 S 

&75 

8 J 5 


7.75 

551 

455 

100-100000 

INCOME BONDS 


550 

550 

842 

25400 ( 1*1 

555 

555 

4.72 

25400 R *1 

6.40 

6.40 

SM 

60400 ( 1*1 

650 

650 

557 

5400 mm 

655 

655 

557 

5400 min 


a day 041 - 646 - 4 ® 
1 mtn 0 * 1 - 648-456 
3 mtfi 02536861 
041 - 649-455 
8 day 001-386400 
14 day obi - aaa 48 X 1 


8 days D41-648-4SB 


Chase la 
V«« 
14045716 
tor dab* 


RATES 

Pnraonaf Loan 
Croat Card 


+ 35 % 

7 % 

28 % 

25 - 27 % 


HOLIDAY RATES 

Spanish Posatm: 
Ranch Raoca: 

Qmk DraohM: 
HsRanUro: 


tlqi 

17150 

810 

32700 

211500 


TESSA 

NrtiamlCnta 
MM Trust 


Waat Bromaicdi 
Bovartoy 


CAR E3A0OWI 
(%) 1 year on 

830 E3^8830 90 days loss tnist 
848 £3,284.70 £2S+2mtha notice 
9*9 £3^84,70 £29 

030 £3^70.00 E25+1rmha notice 
030 £337030 


TTOnalar Unknun 


Talaplana 


£3300 037274211 

£ 9,000 071 2831111 

£1 0825 61912 

21 021 525370 

£1 048288510 


' 1M far bafenoM tataar £500. flrat DO id MmM are M acorn tor irtMaM ta MO of 

M 'MHcna r -- ... 


■ Mum heMno* « to ndOOO far fa waam , » tnna rtn o oncMdi of aortno maa 
Mfaa fltot laa -S*max tamila paid gnm tHsfw rtoaa tor hw mmm P tonior 
*iniaaMtotflhanx»M *fi — r *i nnur-tTTnV rwi — wnm waffTltTwitir 


LMdar 

Hsraat 

RataX 

Loan 

Stas 

Mkx% 

Notas 

BUILDING SOCIETIES 




Unnosal 

0912320973 

645 

to Cl 00k 

85 

Atar25K dtooxjnt 
tor 8 months 

YbriwMra 

0274 740740 

6.00 

to£2S0k 

95 

Atar 24% discount 

Bradtom & Blngloy 
0274555555 

645 

C60k+ 

80 

Atari 55% for 1st 

12 months 


BANKS 

AMayNatfanal 

0600555100 


635 £80- 100k 


90 Atari . 75 % dbcount 


BANKS 


Bank of Scot 
5688555 


630 ESOk-f 


85 


Atar2%itacoinikr 

laiyoar 


Sdutck rntfm Qufaw LkL FtoancW tafamaagn PiwkMra 0783 060482 


Do you prefer to 
be charged £300 
or £15 for a PEP? 


An i niti al charge of just '/»% - that’s just £15 on an 
investment of £6,000 compared with the usual £300 
charged by many companies - makes The Equitable PEP 
- a tax-free savings plan a particularly at t ractive way of 
easing yourself into the Stock Market. 

Unlike most (bum of saving this tax-free savings 
plan is entirely free of income and capital gains ray, 
whether you decide to take the proceeds as income or 
as a lump sum, because h is a unit mist Personal 
Equity Plan. 

In addition to its tax incentives, the Plan has great 
flexibility. You can invest monthly, annually or con- 
tribute a lump sum. What’s more, you do not have to 
commit yourself to making identical contributions. And 
you have the choice of having the income from the Plan 
paid in cadi or reinvested. 

Jtemember that the value of units and the income 

from them can go down as well as up. The above is based 

on current cax legislation which can change in the future. 

If you would like further information by post atu ^ 
by telephone on The Equitable PEP - a tax-free 
savings plan, contact Equitable Unit Trust Manages on 
Aylesbury (0296) 26226 or send off the coupon below. 

EQUITABLE UNTT TRUST MANAGERS LTD 

“-^ito&r- - - 


iModuuno 
BEW^reTMH-y AM^uniiaWgw^ 

Tmt Ungm 1st PXffiPCST. W** S«a. AYLESBURY. 


. ’-Aax free u rinff pton. 

□ tapnainnaui Q TMXA2B 


| ADDRESS 

- 






Trl-Bt— ^ 




_ 






RKftanfcon Wes 


WbxnhbnrK 


El 


Spring R»n 


BMlEM EnS^ i 
IHE3333C3B12 S^H^^bi 

EE^ngbsdS 

e mw bmi 

IDl^iEE^^BEEIS!Eai 

IDEIESBHiil^ " 


Foods 


ChcmsJlas 



EJEna— EUKj 
B ima E^Mi 
Ea ESgaSuMEESM l 
mr~ i t ii 

E ESSEI51»l:!Bi^H!Bl f jif I 

fm 

EDI 

mC.-;~ 



BANKS. DISCOUNT, HP 


221 162 Allied GoiHas 

SB 413 Amafem 
31% ft AMO Old 
9025 TSSfittStM I 

b nm 

UU TOO Bon DH3t> i 
M US Bb*den 
153 IIS Brem Chora 

«a 4U Br Bto-TMi 

95 17 QfldGp 

179 112 Cuudof (W) 

616 yn Cmrool* 

229 142 CRJdt 

2)1 152 HUH ft mud 

K% 7 Kunj CDtoor 
91 <3 Etude 

500 342 Wiad(Q 

22 7 158 BJdmn 

tira 7S37%HoerfcS 9 

un ns us i 

65* 04 inane 

328 138 Ldjll 

so u mi 

ISO 1HO Must QOo I 
400 360 " 20* 

395 B 

W 231 Up* 

160 130 FUrralr 

u ft Sturm* spat 

4X2 SB VKTBtSmTTt 
3S0 230 Wlunhlnc X 

389 2SS YulaOKB 
m 2H Toucan 



1104 «3 

255 Z» 



ns 6i i 

2*7 

1*7 

SB 

)» 


*9 

51 

114 

82 

115 

M 

352 

273 

a* 

26* 

2S4 

194 

128. 

108 

*13 

429 

83% 

0 

1*4 

H2 

in 

IX 

68 

0 

13(0 

1066 

75% 

61 

MB 

78%! 

a 

94. 

115 

» 

127% 

97% l 

KB 

W 

a 

MSI 

a 

18 

15) 

9b 

zn 

226 

» 

51 

63 

XI 

378 

268 

171 

137 

74% 

5?M 

or 

03 

179 

U9 



eftaeaNnimpnLUcri 

DIVIDEND £2,000 

Qain g req u ired far +44 poiflB 

fta iumtc should ring 0254-S3Z72 


High Lon Company 


Fite No Yld 
{j$ .1- di* % ME 


4312H 3025 5cumnwscr 3850 «S0 ... 20 ... 

g 4| Mlwi 4 

Hb 435 Shell HO - 4 319 SJ 2L7 

2Q6 110 SWtteKBgS* 199 

19 ft%7BWB* 11% - % 

12 2ft TnanHawpc 3$ 7.9 

172 I3> Waodildf 153% -IS... 2J ... 


PAPER, PRINT, ADVTG 


LEISURE 


6ft 3 AbbreaH Lds 3*ft 
333 172 Ataonn 260 

90 II AM Uh 3 

20 145 UKtUTV 183 

217 13S Bur ft W "A" 168 

JCW TVS BODXTt «*» B2D 

US 30 Bonier TV* 104 

lft 4 near wetter ft 

15 Tiiwrttngtam 1m ft 

448 2C Campirt 211 

22ft 13ft Oplrai if} i 

731 4tt Orttoo Comm 717 

223 IX CKdeCanm* rs2 

1560 laso central tv isa 
■8 « Qnrrelh 71 

539 «B Corn pm Gp 483 

341 zn Enroamp 3M 

1693 680 Emo Dhney 683 

JO I Earn Utiurt 2% 

36 II BHands 18 

10% ! Expadfcr* ) 

448 110 ntrtm B08B 237 

331 zn Plat Item 3BJ 

328 250 GW1 Cp* 290 

130 91 crampUm 1ST 

8 5 Grceinri* CHS* ft 

92 13 HIV Group 24 

208 M KFTK Spora 34 

18% 2%KonkX 4% 

297 220 EWT Cl* 251 T 

IS 44% Owners AhTlI 76 

31 19 The KUcm Gp 28s 

64 50 Prtss LHane* 53 

41 |9 Qntftmt Grp ao 

319 277 teiflo CJxte* 229 

177 IS Mm id CuS CFO 140 

441 2Q2S SOM TV 395 

66 40 Smarm MB 43 

191 us sank? uhare 16ft 
U 4 Suntelgh * ft 

195 125 Smses • Vine 138 

O Z7 T3W SI 

93 62 TV4JB* 73 

29% 35 TVS » 

200 134 IMmct TV 1C 

118 75 Tonenten Hot 81 

75 s Trans oram* 39 

10 2 -reman* 3 

269 IS diner TV 2(0 

50 16 Wembley 17 

lft «%Whtee*ce I 

»1S 113 YorteUir TV 115 

136 95 20KB Gp 9$ 


07 

♦ I ... 29 Oft 

,2 47 14.7 U 

SJ Ift5 

... 100 7.9 8 A 
♦10 200 2ft 14ft 
35 118 

«"». 'ii ::: “u 

6.1 6 ft 

♦ 2 52 49 - 

- 2 IS5 29 22ft 

lft 14ft 

.15 305 2ft 200 

-2 lift 'll 15ft 

♦ 3 ... 40 15ft 

-10 ... lft ... 


.. 105 61 - 

6 5.7 17 112 

lft 23J 

2 5J 4ft 108 

i' 'it !i! 

I 5ft ... 11 
.. lft ... 9ft 

• 2ft 122 

4 12 5ft 46 

% ... 4.7 «ft 

7.1 6.7 


- S% ... M 117 

'.!i is 'it lift 

215 16 

♦2 L5 

12 

... 75 5ft 52 

4ft 


75 18 111 

lft 

... 250 27 
120 119 41 
80 lift 95 



MINING 


DRAPERY, STORES 


prefer w 
ted £30° 
r 8 PEP? 


382 91 

109 S 

TOb HO 

99 ST 

278 180 

340 110 

ISO 112 

144 74 

171 86 

114 22 

371 IS 

12% 3 

316 260 

66 30 

320 US 

558 315 

131 S 

33] 151 

16) 81 

351 300 

32 120 

ill as 

47% 23% 

216 179 

495 355 

33 
710 
66 


25 
33 
56 S 

168 130 

I9S 40 
591 414 

73 54% 

665 405 

373 162 

IS 90S 
348 268 


building, roads 



U AfiOcy 


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ICS 

C 4 alien* 

182 




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HU 

27 

£££%»* 

m 

Hi MRBBI 
ji fianrat Dm 

m 

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* 


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no 

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2*4% 


2S 

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131 


in 




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82 

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114 

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JM 

13 H?*® *5ft 



X 



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29% 


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97 


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2 » 


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SZ AB Food 
Z2SA5DA Gcotp 
75 ftOBi* RtKh 
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223 Ait* 

11 Aifcy Grom 
HO Anoc FUinfe 
143 Mac s a 
200 mar (aG) 

74 Beam asp* 
m Mated cod 

312 Botes 

» BcrtwVk 
334 BUfc Bio, 

31 Baten 
412 adfiorrasw 
64 AZB MTWwi 
105 Cffltort re -A- 
10 CnnswWc* 
s outers 
m D«tep*2 

*zi 5cj2» 

92S Everest 
234 Puerat* 

4 MtnofConl 
S3 PhUc Ptmed 

68 Wta 

2H tea i 
6 Octal* 

34 (mod Centre! 
•I Butotood PC* 
61 EDtetera 
33 HnBf 
412 irrtmd Prazen 
103 JUGtoBp 
534 1*8 Sat 
i® law (K«3 
39 Minhews « 

9 Mentan EataO 
DSMonten m 
318 mates ON) 

215 NOm Foods 

11 uahmlan 
132 Nmdta Peock 
78%70dl Food* 

45 tacns Mod 

130 KHM 
ISBtaino HHl» 
331 Samj&nryJ 
36 Sentry mm* 
175 Ores Mod 
285 TMS»l9te 
»4%THn? 

152 T B ntw ons 
83 Tttaa* 

192 iMgaa 

222 Utd aheobs 

12 Vsbotar 

205 «BSMD a m 



r 
580 
ft. 
KH 
31 
3% 

u 

54 

122% M% 
4% 

68 
W% 

175 
24 
40 

n 
62 


... 2L7 30 126 
I 3ft 7.1 »J 


... 0ft ... 
180 4J0 6ft 

'i0 '« lift 

282 

4ft ... 20 

... 1U L8 
17 17 196 


U 15 203 
Oft 43 10ft 


0* 

u 


8.1 

7.7 

‘ii 

41 

12ft 

217 

3J 

57 

142 

2ft 

82 

lift 


MOTORS. AIRCRAFT 


*8 8ft 2ft Wft 

-2 ... 27 8ft 

... lift 76 10.7 

• 4 ... 4.1 149 

- 1 83 23 B.I 

... 16 17 146 

45 lift 

• I 155 66 106 

• 2 155 17 12ft 

... Oft 3J 105 

... 118 75 M 


HOTELS, CATERERS 


» At*tfnS*B* 16 

52 c*y cerate M a ... lft 

112 Rate M9 -2 96 

94 meunr awn » -i is 

5 HinnacB Ite* 7 

126 Udtarote 1*4 -1 1U 

3nUMatUa Oua 57 - 3 ... 

X qoeejtt Mtat 42 - 1 2J 

51*1 -do- 7%» Cfpr 19 , % 75 

3 MBSiBoteix* 3ft 

16 team Botes 19 - s 3ft 

420 BlgHl Bl 'A' S3 ... 721 

28 Jtiipa . e i r On* 31 

a son 34 «i ts 


10) 45ABHM • 49 

J97 128 ACT Group 071 

231 195 M8U » 

47% 6 Aa« iCSinp* 38 

3«2 299 Adndte » 

U3 94 AIM » 

S , 5 SBS* | 

■S Si&““ 1 

£■ £ 

2D 15.BH1M0 * *“*?* 

360 HP SS St 

«Q SM M* . .*£ 

4575 1450 Bottod* IK 

284 a Boathorpe 268 

418% »5 W «l 

315 212 IT WW _ 307 

8% i rtsw* * 

226 a MIBflrt . « . 

as 489 CsMe Wtrdtss 646 1 

14% 4%C3il0t»e 6% 

m 205 CAHkA* 306 

116 62 coapre wpfc w 

K 8 o Hnw ri * 

92 WiCny Etas « 

506 331 SOI W 

150 HI Dl WM B S B* 190 
415 ITS Domino 4H 
66 43 IXMdtal MQi 44 

1015 no a nte* «? 

341 22) BWBWrani » 

)45 286 nun 5» 

47 a B asiun Hone 4D 
25% 7 tears b 

419 292 414 

99 51 m » 

335 227 VWmB mea 3Ji 

« « raant* 3 ' 

13 SS BBBSrt. 9, 

W » WM « 

M 71 Mndgm JM 

28% » wand ts* »% 

an wo one _ ao 

227 104 omsdv B4 

57 a HMm* « 

451 393 BrtBte Cp « 

IS 75- ^TW* . « 

273 >90 «ser snort » 


85 4ft 135 
... M 175 


... U 15 W 

1 47 65 129 




... (9ft 89 18* 
... 80 20 I7J 


industrials 


- 1 86 49 13ft 

-6 1MW U 

1-7 1X0 

... 2ft 0.7 56ft 

5.7 63 

*9 50 40 150 


198 135 

50 460 

203 122 

136 K 

(0 a 

139 ■» 

33 5 

3» 2D 
115 38 

22 12 
443 356 

62 9 

4C0 308 

33 Q 
160 IS 
HO SCO 
41% 29% 

168 12) 
3% IV 
W 300 
IS lffl 
W 4fi 
68 35 

Ifl MI 
S3 a 
4i7 a 
Tfi IS 
tt% 51% 
408 296 

sa so 
W4 115 
10 36% 

7% X% 
2H in 
KB7% 550 
41 7 

62 37 

X 13 
18 5 

31 10 

22% a 

«5 444 

181 109 

144 H 


... 6J 86 
WJ 40 17ft 

U 60X13 

5ft 49 UJ 
90 ... Id* 
70 75 149 
U) 15ft 5ft 
7 S 26 121 
36 52 49* 

iu M iift 
22 196 4ft 
nil 41 9.9 
... 89 460 
4ft 44 143 
... 28 145 
lft 41 9 l 6 
4ft 44 1L0 
U 33 ... 
1U 55 19.1 

43 

53 110 

2 IS *46 IU 

’« "48 52 
.. 41 173 
32 70 ItS 
.. 7J 130 
14S 43 Hi 
45 5J 19ft 
34 ... 43 


20 ... 142 
M 47 04 
U 

... 47 ... 


42 45 59 
184 

0*„. ... 


197 
55 
244% 

37 
157 

99 
4% 

41 

a 

07 
161 
283 * 

K7 89 

m s 

100 70 
B0 34 

332 166 

JJ 6% 

72% 32 

201 M9 
918 285 

306 210 

16 « 
180 127 

266 175 

491 30 

4*6 JIT 
73 44% 

207 in 

62 14 

35 S 

0 a 

113% 31 

458 2S 
SO 450 

73 44 

a x 

30 2S 
113 « 

118% 16 
16 71 

6% 3 

ICO 61 
KB 120 

36 Iff. 
II 10 

316 157% 

IB 57 
31* 31S 

33B 200 

155 08% 

5* M 
a i9 
<2 31 

21S 171 
358 m 
119 72 

12 *. 6 % 
93 S 
98 <6 

7ft IS 

iu a 
x a 
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INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1530 

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,A - 


1 " 

■ ■- ' . • i 1 J. ii 


2 6 UNIT TRUST PRICES 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 








‘ “It-'-' 

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I TRUST MANAGERS 


46.13 ICO* - 200 2.11 
*M0 7*44 -2S3 IJS 

50-73 <3.46 -0J5 156 

M.H -2M 1.14 
5SX 5US *024 JJ1 
13250 l«XW * IJQ 403 
2*M0 261. KT -II40 4.74 
I2WD 133.701 - 140 7.11 


ABIRUST MANAGEMENT LTD 

AtotoABKH 

Date OMSUsttl 

AnCTIKGDI 38.13 40JB - 1.49 200 

European Mis 7X77 - 1.48 ... 

SpipeanBK 70 33 74.731 -ftw in 

Bronx 83000 857XU *1100 357 

BBnlnc 37« +3*51 - aiS cliO 

P Erot Eraerg Ee tfjb 7Z71 -44)041 


C4PELCURE MYERS UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS LTD 

35 ftnata sow. m«ik1»bi MZ2AF. 
EawiricP MI 23656S5. 
oSe»I 2365342 

CvebdlifTnHD 

AmetKaaGoi 11900 IZ740 -440... 

■Oo-AK 137 JO 13550 - *40 ... 

European 59.47 6299 * 1J2 1.18 

-do-Act 6164 6529 - LB 1.18 

Far East ecu 4X51 *U9 - 232 ... 

40-MC 4251 4629 -232 ... 

aenMaiS 206J0 JI90O - 750 10] 

-00- ACC 23 100 2*40 -8.10 101 

GlUKb 34080 36450 6 620 Z0S 

-dv-tef 579*0 619.90 *1050 2*5 

iMDOMGrowm 216.10 357*0 ♦ 540 LSD 

-OD-MX 45180 461.90 * 120 450 

MawrFMtUUO SSIIO 91084) -Z70O 124 

-do- Me MIO90 KUAO -154)0 124 

special Sits 77.9) 8291 * 127 279 


jqnn a rran t an *8241 - 022 057 
SnhpBnpl 419.40 43L40 » 130 011 


ENDURANCE FUND MANAGEMENT 
41 ftarrfaTOM Gfekrt London SW74JU 
0713737361 


me u mT nn t 
naeniB&anal 
/•pen That 


13250 16220 - a to 128 


AjjUED DUNBAR UNIT TRUSTS 
ABM Dnofcar Centre Bradaa. SNI I EL. 
0793 514514. 

DaBap 0793*10366 

HIgb lac 32250 355.40 • 270 522 

Eoanrme wojd aoiM • ijd so) 

HlghTteW 20X00 sum * ISO 4.9* 

■alnKtO 57120 MUD* - 440 23* 

American lac 4241 45-33 - 122 US 

WM Aset YU JllE 3429 -066 1.73 

lapan 128.70 LW50 - 130 OOI 

Secs al A» 395.40 4a070r -IJ20 025 


■Oa-Aec 900* 9183 * 147 279 

Bamw Fuad 

HStirteM iobjO ihoot *isoo 50s 

■OyNX 12370 12760 *1800 5 OS 


EQUITABLE UNIT TRUST MANAtaRS 

Watoo SL Barts. HP21 7QIW. 

0296431488 

mens wjs iaui - o<2 42* 

Htah BWBTDt HM-41 KH9ir * 041 160 

In of W* Taj H9 96 126J7 * 100 106 

Spoon Sta 7074 74.46 • L2Q 4-12 

Nath unotaa 9640 10156 - IS* 128 

TarBUMHI 1«L6) 190)2 -«M 10» 

InQGnJ** 8009 8421 - 214 IJD 

Emwean 5629 5925 - 1.14 2X6 

smaller OB 5 MS 59.42 - 040 298 


mo American 
ndfle 
nop Stum 
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9949 * 1.92 SJ» 
142 Ml - 520 028 
9648 - 2*2 ... 
11220 • SJO 229 
236*0 - 250 0X9 
31080 -1720 ... 
14190 - 040 4,71 
203.90 - 1.90 252 
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inaxueGaoB 6652 7077 * 021 296 

ftdGromb 44JD 46M - 108 1.17 

jnpin 4527 *8M - 1-84 - 

Unif— . Dip* why 102201 - 010 89* 

M Anier Equity 3072 3W» - 1^ 051 

UR Equity 77 J6 82301 * an >20 


HALIFAX STANDARD' 

management ud 


PO Bm 880, nihluli SHIS 1EW- 
0808838868 


LAURENCE KERN UNIT TRUST 

MANAGEMENT 

l-WhAeHntYmd.lnnAMSEl.D7l 407M6* 
income cm Uk *8.47 Si 56 • on 5-in 


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AM EQUITY * (AW 

KGroget Hk ea qnulto St CMcriq 

0203 553231 

UKGnnnbAK 24L ID JWJW * *20 1*3 
■dome ZKJO 221.401 ♦ 100 243 

Higher Inc *« 44X20 SJO.IOT • nJD 4X4 

-do Inc 307 JO 327 D® • 140 *M 

GUKTli! Itn ACC 16610 175.40 -040 685 

-do- Inc «S2 4*J5 - 021 685 

KUi America 2*020 2641® - 7 JO ... 

F4r East 221.10 235301 -2010 024 

EDlDpe 193LSD 205.40 - * JO OM 

General me J42J0 *17 Jo • no 30* 

-dO-ACT 42720 *54 JO » 2*0 UM 

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geag lfct Ml UNddHo; undid El 5. 

Capital 94.43 10640 • IJD IN 

EnroGdi Inc 1 0080 10680 -3i» 1X2 

Exnainc 41.94 48J3 * ijo 6 10 

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COt FM Inc 5582 57.77T - 019 « 14 

1 octane *2200 451 JO * UO 580 


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or Lmdoa EC3M4HU 
aC*«: 071 955 M5S 
177.40 18L70 - 7 JO lit 

*89.70 52280 * 480 181 
11730 12670 - UD 1X7 
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63.52 67.79 - 306 128 

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115.70 IZ3.40 - 9.70 LIS 
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11480 U2J0 7 1X0 162 


FIDELITY INVESTMENT SERVICES 
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OakH Haim. tM ToMdge Id. TDriMApe 
TNII 9DZ. 084M4I4I9I 
America 195.40 20670T -670 ... 

casausirm noo) mxu» ... xao 

European Ta 4673 10290 -280 ... 


FOREIGN ft COLONIAL 


8W Flow. Exchange Hre. 
EC2A2NY. 071 62X8604 


HAMBROS UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
5 Rmfcfeh Rd, UiiiHiii nudmiu K Emet 
E«Sita* 8277 227306L 
6277 6941390 

Canadian 5L37 SUIT - 328 0X7 

Equity inane 9*41 k&k* *080 627 

Boropeu 121.70 12BJD -020 1X3 

inO SBnadoe 662* 663* - 1.96 ... 

Jtpvne 101.70 106107 - 4J0 ... 

Noritt American 9L47 98.1 It - 319 034 

Scandinavian 9617 10030 • 0.10 0X6 

Smaflercos 25.15 2675 • oxz 129 


EDDSy AK 

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30U0 414X0 * 690 125 
71480 780JB * UO US 
(L93 87.16 ' LB 5.M 

82.98 8829 - 215 211 

11610 1*2.70 -1110 029 
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I7J7 9L65T * 021 7.12 

5144 5685) -2JI IJ2 

51.41 Mjtf) - 114 S.16 

4637 51X61 - 227 ... 

78.90 819ft - 1« 0X3 

64.71 88X4 - 7.77 IJI 


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30050 320X01 
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77.40 BUM 
6652 1039 

7453 7032 

*8X9 51X3 

4926 5255 

RUi 7572 
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40U 4181 

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46X54 *028 3X5 
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Z.46T • 008 036 
3X13 - 044 226 
566*1 *069 600 
39-81 - 089 123 
2S03T - 012 665 


EC2A2NY. 071 
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Fir Eastern 
areas income 
UKonmta 
UK Income 
US Smaller Gk 


IdS 8000 

8056 0126 - 1.92 109 

99X9 107 JD -7X0 ... 
74X1 79X5T - 684 306 

8430 9016 ♦ U4 0X8 

4006 96327 * 124 4.71 

19070 20400 • 620 ... 


FRAMUNGTON 




CAZENOVE UNIT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT LTD 
It TohnhooK YanL Loadan EC2R7AN. 
#71605 9703 

American Ftatlo 7U* 867 It - 2X7 103 
European P folio 62X9 6676 -IX! 128 

Japanese* 7 » too 44C5 4682 -ill ... 

Fanner folio 7Sjo sooti -6X3 2.42 

CazenmePtoUd 62.9 1 6729 - 042 300 

UK Income GDI 5625 6049 * 029 5X3 


CENTRAL BOARD OF FINANCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 
2 Farr Street. Lnadoa BCZY5AQ. 

071 588 ISIS 

lamoeaifU S5Q.95 565x0 *1720 527 

Fixed bn 149.10 IAS - Z2S 9XS 

Deposit 7.15 


BARING FUND MANAGERS 


PO Baa 156 I 
MI 858 94102 
AmencuiGDi 


Kent BR34XQ. 


AmencuiGDi 8333 89.16 - 3X3 010 

Amer5mUrOH ro.40 noxo - 490 ... 

Australia 

OanvmJMes *632 *9j* • 050 7x0 

Eastern 152J0 16400 -19.40 i.to 

Equity Income 6651 70.751 • 027 680 

European GUI 20060 ’050 - J0O ixa 


CHARITIES OFFICIAL INVESTMENT 
FUND 

2 Fan Sheet. Uadm EGEYSAQ. 

071 588 1815 

InautK 55807 559X2 >15.97 521 

-da- A<x 2L30J 21*50 *76X3 ... 

Deposit 70D 

Fan tat Inc 12125 L21.TO - 1.76 9X4 

-do- Acc 15497 155.10 - 126 ... 


0713744100 

Amsmnrco 

-do- ACS 
Capdal 
On acc 
cona sronrcns 
■dnAec 
cumuinde 
-do- Are 
European 
-do- ACC 
Dora income 
-dn Acc 
Financial 
-do- ACC 

Hcaitb Pttnd inc 
-do- Acc 
income 7tot 
-do- ACC 
Inti Growth 
-da - acc 
J apan Geo 
-dnAcc 

MngdPtoUotnc 

-do. 1.T 

MonflUy inBOoic 
Keomy 
-do- ACC 
Gototh-nt 
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UNIT MANAGEMENT 
oadoa ECUM3FT. 



HENDERSON 
PO Dm 2003. Breonmod 
Eimdriea 0277 237310. 
DcmSne 0»7 234772 
AtaersnaUsr B&iS t 
Arias Hneerprtse os.ro 1C 
AnsmBau HTJfl II 

Etarqxui 30606 12 

Ecrcpeea Inc 60X3 t 
Bum furl CD MUX* 11 
Emahronu 228.12 34 
FunflyotFundr 61JZ t 
FtoMlmerest 5201 5 

Global Kesoar 6637 7 

Hteblne 23920 25 

lMSMGth 205X4 21 
-do-Ace 51699 H 

l amuaU npaJ >9829 21 
japan SpcSK 16305 it 
japan 1*201 15 

NAmer 213.12 22 

nctflc5mnrcns 128.16 u 
PrercUi 43X1 4 

Smaller Cm T*» 127.71 13 

Special SIB 21674 22 


□Hi J7J7 (0X51 *0-21 7.12 

GtoUriGrowDi 5344 56X51 - U l !■» 

tad Bool 5i.4i MX* - LH S.16 

Japanese 4137 5iX6r - 2B ... 

OVBseuEqaler 7l« ®-*« - “f 

peaoctan 64.71 6834 -r.v iji 

North American 124J0 L3Z.K - & ° >-f* 

UK e rco T ci y 65.11 69271 * I B 3-48 

UK Sail/ COS 8558 9104 * IJt 257 

Worldwide 6625 RX48T -041 304 


SCSI Ot BrtUrii 9646 
Spirit of me East 44X3 


- %39 ... 

- 4.-41 1X2 

-2X0 1X6 

- 3X7 1X6 

- 1.11 3JI 

- 3X5 1.77 

* 1.13 6.45 

- om ix« 

- 127 9128 

- 044 1.90 
. 691 5X9 

* 19S 4.76 

* 7.40 *.76 

- 52* 103 
-6J5 ... 
-675 ... 

- 8.91 039 
-1097 1X7 

* 004 4L48 
» 12B 606 

* 3X6 208 

* 529 206 

* 070 2.93 

- 175 096 


HILL SAMUEL 
NLA Tower Adfl 
Ml m 4MB 
Brash 
Capital 
Doner 


IT MANAGERS 


LLOYDS BANKU^T 
MANAGERS LTD 
Mintiie.i fee. Gkaflt 
0834 834313 
Balanced 784.90 

do- ACC 61690 

Coral Euro GDI *429 

-do- ACC *6M 

Briatac H 2 M> 

-do- ACC 917.40 

German eta 8699 

-do- Act 9L22 

Income JMXO 

-do- ACC 10000 

Japan Growth <A0D 

-do-Aoc OBJ* 

leaner Ttus 45.9* 

■do- ACC 49X7 

N American Gen UDJO 

-do- Acc 19670 

NAmSmCDBec 136.90 

-do- Are 129*0 

FariQeBarin 197.90 

-dO- ACC 16610 

smell as Bee 23950 

-dO-Are 30090 

uxGnmh tow 

-do - acc euro 

t ta rtdw h tecta 237 JO 

-do- Are 34950 


TRUST 

wm. Ken MB44JF. 


- 200 323 

- 4JD 3J3 

- 1.17 IJO 

- IX* 1X0 

• 2*0 4X3 

• 5X0 4X3 

- 3xo a*o 

- 356 040 

• *00 *23 

• 1000 423 

- 389 001 

- K70 001 
> 0X2 1X2 

- 0X9 1X2 

- 3.90 001 

- 680 001 

- 5X0 001 

- 5J0 aoi 

•1930 0.71 
-2020 071 

- 2X0 3.12 

• 320 112 
-074 2X4 

- 086 2X4 
-I IJO 025 
-15X0 035 


MIDLAND UNIT TRUSTS LTD 
192 Ejre Mitt SbeffleU SI 3RD 
Date 0742520260 
Eumrari #742 529076 
Balanced DBt 5118 5688 - 025 

-00- ACS 5118 36JB -OS 

BrttahUR 7117 7828 * 1.46 

-do- Are 8083 86*5 • 1X2 

European GQt M&00 L560« - 3J0 

-do- ACC 18190 19640 - 420 

Erin FUjpl las 6L72 6601 *0X1 

-do- Are I0U0 11150 - 070 

GOtFbedtat 5*23 54X2 - 091 

-do- MC 14100 14700 - 020 

T ttett 18900 20.101 • 220 

ACC 4)370 *63X0 *500 

Income 80.90 257X0 • 060 

-do- Ace 19*20 528.90 * IJO 

Japan OB 28970 256*0 -11. JO 

-dD-ACC 25300 270X0 -12X0 . 

Kardarlu Are 75 *9 80.7* - 6*7 

North American 1*9.90 leoxff - 7 Jo 1 

-dU-AOC 188X0 201.90 -910 


fSPS"?4L ,,Nrr TRUSTS LTD 
Sift-PteL™- “W- Bn (Gl 2DL 
MI4TS3377. WtrltL M26 925681 
EFSM5 1 " V21 -048 138 

ProCaHratac 10095 100457 * am 656 

-da- Are 10072 102.721 * OU 65b 

jpttgfly . 805J4 647X21 <-721 2J9 

NtiEqabrinr 7019 7506t * 108 *23 

™»1W« 1*7^ 157X01 - 3X8 114 

FTOQtatalOfc <625 73X1 - 126 t.1S 

PraHMi Enc 7637 81X7 • 0X5 600 

MM 13216 1*124 -620 123 

PmZRBSmOB • 5tX5 SB23 -2.48 1.1 1 

12506 13175 - 613 ... 
12401 U2X3T - SJS 053 

SL*0 6ZX5 - 643 225 

48J7 SOlSt * 0.14 7X3 

6497 8948r • 1*3 301 


UK Eq General 
-do- ABC 
European Att 
nr East Ate 
GOI FM Itn tac 
NAnertconAcc 
OBlcrCDSACC 
UEE4HRhlnc 
■do- Are 

UKl^Gostac 
UK IS* CD* NX 


Dispute 

tmhes 


i 


ruMBMOff 12401 DUB - SJS 051 

PninOfleMH 56*0 62*5 - 6*3 225 

noKCDITIK 4847 50-lffl 1 0.14 7X3 

ProsmBroos 6*07 69*» • 1*3 301 

«□ Spec Sta 898* 960B *091 21 7 

Pm UKGtwnt I t»a* 107.9* • IJ6 ZXB 

-Rnaeriy Wotaamu uH 


jPW KHM KIND 
LTD 


japan cm 
-do- Are 
Mandarin Acc 


DcAp 07I434 298W 
Income 139.73 

Japan I9U0 

Major UK CM 87 JO 

America raceme *0634 
-dO-A re 471X6 

SomrUK Cat 20071 

Butar European 214x0 


MANAGEMENT 
n BC4N8NSL 


IS034I • LIS 170 
205-25 - 8-72 ... 
9U2T -0X8 634 
-0457 -17.78 074 
JD476 -00X4 074 
2I9J9 .420 1.97 
2S.11 - 47* 1.93 


STATE STREET UNIT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT LTD. 

BMfc Caret 20 BMm txnx latare 
EC3V9AQ. 071*261977 
Global A KB 50 11110 -950 

USEq U3X0 1 30 TO - 25U . . . 

Bit Cm Eq 10100 107-30 - )*> ■ 

tantm Fq 1DLQ0 IdhJO - AID ... 

FTEurooe 11020 11720 * 140... 

FT «nU Am I06» UIXO - *20 

FT Japan rtnio K3U» - vai ... 

FTAiaMP 9401 *9.94 -U)K ... 

STEWART IVORY UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

45 ChmMtSq. EdMrarBk- 
831 2263271 

Inartsii 3J6« MOM - 900 032 

Britan If* m KDXO *1000 ill 

urniw— 32320 34* 20 -14X3 1X3 

jama (0*. tO UO* - 4*0 ... 

NewradOc 2*050 73010 -1930 LK 

U MirMii 9630 9630 * 008 623 

Majority SO? 10052 10152 * 009 641 

Sw 1MX0 16590 - 070 25* 

SafitaPTT 331X0 3*620 


cond 


m 


i *K 1 


MORGAN GRENFELL 
FUNDS LTD 
20 ritaton . CSrori. Load 
TVw9n| 071 836 0826 
PraptiA* 071 826 0123 
A m e ri can Gm 22440 

Cash Hk 10026 

Cash Are 12022 

Euro Grit ACC 21010 

Eurapa 44*5 

tnO Gib 14010 

Japan Tractor S195 

UKEmdqtBK 1 21.70 

-do- ACC 14650 

OK tad Tractor 13050 

USEqlDdTtkr 173-20 

-do- ACC 18220 

Arian Trader 113X0 


INVESTMENT 


SAVED PROSPER 
IWWhMlU R 


#7M 766966 «r 0880*29929 (TEAS oubt 
AIBarlncGtb 622S tun - 2X3 *.71 

Capbai Units usjd mm -4JD 1.74 

Cunmmttts 7558 6359 - 1.10 IJ6 

5*ropmacm 12933 isr^jr - 300 1 27 

Ruanda! See 14340 iffisot - IJO i*S 

fUghKentni 19050 302X0 *310 6X4 

«8hY leM 18470 [96X0 • 208 AM 

tacBoeunta 9L« 9ixo * 153 7X6 

b neum ei H 14170 152X0 -010 ADO 

Japan Gth 962* 104X0 -4X0... 

Japan Smaller 1X50 M*JO - 630 (UB 

KanerTUDd 3850 *0.951 - 1X0 1.42 

Saata 21100 224*0 - 200 ad 

setnbaros 2U.70 223201 *2J0 399 

SCMJlelta 2(0.70 215XO * 270 610 

Stasatod 108X0 11550 - 170 H77 

Smaller Cos 17570 18690 * IJO 7J7 

Special Situation 93.4S 99X1 *0X9(396 

BKEmibr 30233 21510 - 310 373 


- ua ow 

* aio 617 

* 612 on 

- i» ... 

- 1X0 ... 

- 3.90 ... 

- 30* ... 

• LM US 

• 200 601 
♦ UO 351 

- 7X0 LG 
-UD 1X3 
-1*50 L2S 


UNIT TRUST 


Far East 
Financial 

am vsd inline 
HlgHTteU 


EuroSutUrCoa DUB 146701 - 620 150 


EMTOpt 76G 7656 *090 390 

German Growth 4&2I 5143 -155 090 

Gtotai Growth 450* loixot - jjq ... 

Japan Gmrtb 1450) 155X0 - 750 ... 

Japan Sunrise 115x0 L2240 -4*0... 

PnrHotto 10700 11103 - OJO 240 

-do- ACC 189.10 196X0 - 050 140 

UK Growth 65X7 7007 • 1X7 JJO 

UKSnsanrrCM 63.10 66*11 • 1XS 200 

Select Managers 5552 9952 -075 AIO 


CITY FINANCIAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS LTD 

I Whto Hart Yard. Uudoo Bridac. SEI. 
871 487 IM* 

city Ftn Amos 5728 (030 • 043 235 

Beckman Inti 7309 77.46 - 075 316 

Friars Hoc Inc I09S2 170691 • 1X7 7J2 

Friars fee cap 228.17 2*414 * 601 30* 


BRITANNIA LIRE UNIT MANAGERS 
UD 

190 Wm George Sc atapow G2 2PA. 


solan Gib AK 

VIK 

0406 

* I.U 


-do-lne 

MJ2 




Global Bum 

2655 

28.17* 

- IW 

in 

(ilCh YteU AK 

4SXS 

480] 

• 1J3 


-rib- IM 

30.77 




SmtrCosAK 

C6.H 

te.74 

* IJS 

ZXI 

<to tnr 

6I.IT 

65.47 

• us 


Amn Gtb Acc 

*9JS 

$2.78 

- 107 

a. i6 

■do- Inc 

4803 

31.79 


Euro Gib ak 

85X1 




-do- I k 

84X2 




Mnpd PfoUo 

0U3 

31 Jb 

- an 


rvmcorowtb 

7607 




lntiSprtOpp* 

ML77 

74X2 

• 045 

103 


BROWN SHIPLEY 

VI? Pta w muore RA Haywrarii I 

0*44 458144 

FtrancLH 9*51 10070 

smaller Cos ACC 19S.90 20B60 
smaller ere Inc >14.70 12220 
HWtlnC 63 JS 68X2 

income 104.90 I1JJ0 

Mncd Ffafialnc root 84.15 
-do- ACC 147.90 15750 

North American Dtx) 100X0 
Orient >681 93*0 

RKDray 2752 5)511 

Genu an 36JO 39.1st 

llDlBtco* W57 31281 

Cdropean tac 2002 21X0 

QnwCeneraJ 1638 17X0T 


BUCKMASTER MANAGEMENT 
ggwdnrt Hot IS S* B omlp6 Sttttt Uodaw 
EC3A7JI. OH 247 4542. 

Dta&ree on 247 1474 

MtowiMpTO 5500 58X0 -OOI 216 

-do- ACC 61J8 6506 - 007 216 

Income Ftmd 5 116X0 198X0 * 300 450 
-dO-ACC 42470 *51.90 • 680 450 

tar Portfolio 6026 62J7 *004 256- 

-do-ACC 6750 6386 * 00* 256 

Smaller On 93*5 9906 -tun 2X8 

-do-ACC 11000 1 16X0 ... 288 

High tac panto 5300 54.912 *055 SJS 


COMMERCIAL UNION TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Earbaapc Gam 3 BetUonl Part. Crojd. 
CR02AQ. Enquiries Ml 681 222L 
DeaSnr 6SI 686 9818 
American GUi 9672 102X9 - 401 

European GUI 8038 8551 -085 

Far East Gth 80J0 85X3 -640 

Japan CM ABC 302* 32.17 - IJI 

Managed 5680 6043T -025 

-do- Acc 6B5B 7296 - 031 

MflUy | DC HUS 0.96 4677 - 0X2 

Smaller Cor 267S 28X6 * 0J9 

-do- Are 29.44 3152 *032 

UK General 6499 69.141 -013 

-do- Are 77.95 8293 * LI2 

WMdeOd SOU 61X3 -251 

-do- Are 7283 77X8 - 290 

WwUeSpSU 4653 4955 - 149 i 

-do- Are 48.17 5152 - 15* i 

Quitter General 11354 12079 * IJS 

-do- Are 12497 13295 * 138 

Quitter Income 51X6 8687 * OH 

•dD-ACC 97.96 10421 * 0X3 

QulttB-lad 10492 1169* -422 i 

-do- Are 111X3 1185* -429 1 

Quota UK Spec 6231 <629 -077 : 

do- Ace 8244 87.70 * 102 . 

HIFartpnml MlniymMi 
Fill Properly MJ4 89.72 *033 . 

FtadCoa* 3627 3859* *016 I 

da- ACC 93J5 99.20 *040 I 

Equity lac 12876 13698 • 202 • 

da- Are 406X6 41240 *637 • 

High Yield 10858 110191 -027 ! 

-do- Are 387.95 41271 * 417 ! 

Preference 4501 47J8 * 006 I 

dO-ACC 22281 23810 *031 I 

per Europe UB.9* 137.17 -251 1 

PPrOtotal Bad 7474 7952 -3J3 - 

pn Gold can 4031 42X8 -051 . 

PFIThil 49.1) 5227 - L79 . 

nTHanenmf 7SJ8 801* -4199 . 

FPT Japan 53.13 88X4 - 670 . 

WNAner I32M MLR - SXD . 

PPrS-poraMfr 8039 95.10 - 4X3 . 

PITUB 11L07 11616 *282 I 

PPTCTOb 9018 9018 - 009 1 


FRIENDS PROVIDENT MANAGERS 
Code Street SaSAm* Wiki SP1 3SH. 
DeaBnr 0722*11*11 
A da ri ufitrt tioc 0722411622 
EquUyDlJt 32350 3*4 1 SI * 204 30* 

do- ACC U3J0 694891 *414 30* 

Euro Gth Dta 9125 9707 - 100 123 

do-ACC 9)197 99.97 - 300 123 

FtaBdtatDIlt 12520 U243T - 3. IS 678 

dO-Are 2082* 720271 - 152 678 

tall GU DM 6486 69001 - IJ3 096 

dO-ACS 6709 7IJ71 - 1.12 096 

Nth Aina OtK 15229 161.92 -679 UK 

-dO- Ace I642D 17459 - 7 J3 LIB 

Pk Basin mi 18888 197.74 -1418 052 

do-ACC 188X4 200X8 -1439 052 

Stewardship mt 2MJ6 265281 • 3X3 227 
dtp ACC 79 sa> 313X57 *405 227 

Stwd lneDUt $076 54001 *027 474 

do-ACC <1X9 65X47 *0J1 47* 

MAmSnWDtM 8453 8893 -128 007 

do-ACC MA2 95.13 - 147 007 


inn 

Japan Ttcb 


Security 
smiDerCre 
SpedustB 
OS Smaller Cur 


• on UO 
*050 265 
-12X0 028 

- 210 084 
-1300 090 
. 220 3J0 

- O0Z 8XQ 

* 106 612 

• 1X0 440 

- 650 OS 
-219 ... 

- IJ2 066 
« 140 294 
*095 2*0 

• UO 1X0 

- 2X5 ... 


LONDON A MANCHESTER 
wiofedc part. Barer EX5 IDS. 
03C 282673 


7107 

7X071 

• axo 

uo 

30 98 

54.70 

• 0X7 

X90 

lira 

SL72 

- rxr 

090 

54.14 

58091 

- 201 

000 

3SJ7 

3017 

- 1X4 

... 

4SJI 

4803 

- 0.14 

130 


IB! FUND MANAGERS 

36 Queen St Undo* EC4R1BN. 

07IM9MD 

Brito arts 221.40 23300 -10*0 156 

CBp8liG3rth 9422 9818 * 076 273 

lm> Trusts 106X0 11240 -040 085 


MAG SECURITIES LTD _ 

Viooria Rd. ~ - ■ — CM I IFB 
QMer Semces^u* DeuNv OM53903M 
Amertnacen 155.90 37620 -16X0 OM 

do-ACC 43820 46120 -2030 OM 

American Bee 33430 353XDt -1330 091 

dO-AIT 382S) 40440 -15.10 091 

Am bn Co are ups 115x0 -3X0... 

AUanllaACC 11170 12020 - 5.J0 104 

Capital 51140 54500 * IJO 495 

dD-ACC 561J0 M3X0 * IJO 495 


INVESCD MIM DT MANAGERS 
II Drvondure Xq 1 l. Loudon BC2M4YR. 
#71 6263434. Dcafeg; 0890018733 
UKSpedatatltaM 

Smaller Cm nJ3 1874 * 007 3J4 

Special Feanuo 2190 25J9 * 05* 1.93 


CT UNIT MANAGERS 


4Y3. #71 283257$. Dote 871 
AmSpSKs 12880 13750 


Am Sp Sirs 12880 13750 

European MS) 37220 

Far East General 169X0 IBLMr 
Germany 85X9 9095 

Global Assets ta 5842 62X9 

Global Assets AC 6123 <5.47 

taoome 9403 MOXO 

imonreianal 21690 trim 

tan income 67X9 71X21 

Japan General 26610 2S1X0 

smm-cof Df» 38.10 4073 

UK Capital lne 130x0 13950 

do- Are 221.10 23650 

Uk Spec Sits 5680 6075 

US General 46J9 KC0O 

V wide Spec S1Q 101.10 10420 


dan BC2M 
6269431 

- 270 ... 

-600 UB 
-1080 0-36 
-2J6 0X5 
-080 2X0 
-0X5 236 

- 220 7X7 

- 5.90 108 
-217 499 
-1170 ... 

• 1X3 691 

• UO 655 

• S.50 4X8 

• 206 1 88 

- 1X0 OU 
-4J0 OJ2 


Oenesal Ptmds 
UK Growth 48 ta 51X01 * 043 2X9 

U« Earning* 66X6 70X1 ♦ 0X1 220 

do ACC 77.70 8255 * 049 UD 

Managed West 72X1 77X9 - UO IX* 

BupenCbOdron 720* 7688 * 098 1J7 

High income Foods 

CartlDoj 5106 5106 • 005 627 

Ban Inc 6840 7179 * 0X7 5.77 

GUI 27.12 2855 - 003 728 

Income Oth 3*0* 36X71 * 036 408 

M1MB87 73X2 7SX5 ♦ 0J» 876 

Preference 16X3 17X61 • 0J9 7.74 

UK IDCBdie Z7ZJD 291.70 • 4*0 3X7 

Sector SpedaHaFnndi 

Find See 4491 47.717 - 0X1 251 

Properly Shares 4753 3050 - 15* 2J1 

P i .mjv Funds 

Exempt 134)0 130X01 * IJD 408 

European Are 9618 KD0Q - 2*0 2X5 


2679 * 065 1-93 


Capital 515*0 54500 * UO 496 

dD-ACC 56150 »3X0 * IJO 495 

Commodity Ate 31250 330X0 -1.10 1.91 
ConrimdG*b M6W 736*0 * 7.10 3X7 

DMdexal 2190 30907 * 040 SX8 

dD-AK 112*0 12020 • 1X0 5X8 

Equity IOC 230-10 2(630 • 620 709 

European M* 4900 S2J0 - 070 5J0 

dt>- Are 5470 5850 - 070 870 

European Gen 32870 344X0 -8.10 1X5 

dO-Are *0890 0920 -KUO 1X5 

BztroVWd 39980 32080 * 890 899 

do-ACC 861X0 97? HO 4*690 899 

nrSMfem 217X0 232X0 -2100 

-dD-AK 285*0 30830 -Z7X0 155 

Fund of tar 41820 <39. XT ♦ 2X3 190 

dD-AK 749-20 792J0 « 4*0 290 

Geaeral 4640 495) • 090 456 

do- Are 12050 12750 * 2J0 456 

Gflrftdlm 59X0 62X01 ... 800 

do ACC 14550 152X0 - OlO 800 

Gold 29. KJ 3080 - 040 2X8 

dD-AK 3350 35X0 - 050 2X8 

HMtac 2050 2L7Q *030 631 

dD-AK 7400 7830 * 1.40 611 

Infl Growth 50*0 63.10 - ZJO I0B 

dD-AK KS0O 10850 -890 108 

influx' 74X0 7950 -250 876 

Japan Gen Are 3670 38X0 - 200 ... 


IPX. 0345 090 933 
161X0 -U0 1I2 
5436 - 0X6 LSI 
47X1 - 109 097 
4Saor - 142 816 
510V *081 239 
84X61 * MB SXt 
76JJ • 0X3 234 

NM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS UD 
Hr BBu Centra North Ha rfaOuK 
EaqnMer 070S37Z222. 

Dcafiar 0705 M7730 

American Are 4297 *883 - LU 078 

AtEOfOaUACe 237.10 35430 -1 LSD ... 

C&BSdem 5*44 M5B - OM 157 

dDAK 5855 6240 • 055 L57 

European 14920 ipuo - 200 io* 

dD-AK 1 59 JO 189X0 - 2JD ISA 

Esmioaime 07.1* 71X5 * 0*3 627 

dD-AK 100.10 Kbao * 1.10 627 

RrEaflGtb 11970 12790 -ILtO Dm 

ctttFadmc sox: soxi * oca 7 jt 

Gold 24*6 2630 - 025 ... 

do-Are 263* 2BJ2 -029 ... 

tnaane *88$ 48.90 -030 5X3 

dD-AK 137*0 14650 ♦ 250 543 

uroenadimal 2819 72BB - 080 UO 

dD-AK 3622 3846 - 1.14 LCD 

Jap Snore ACC 221 JO 23600 -470 ... 

S PUR Mly ADC 12610 137 JO -850 ... 

Stn&rCttAK 1926 20701 * 008 2J2 

Special Sis 2779 2948 * 041 20* 

dD-AK 31-72 3410 *0X7 20* 

T08JD 5625 62.13 - 236 ... 

dD-AK 688* *U» “ 231 ... 

OSSmJlrCUAa 9516 99X3 -3X7... 

UK Equity 148X0 15850 * IJO 2.16 

dD-AK 272X0 29090 * 8W 3J6 


SUN ALLIANCE 

Aetata. 5 UAriciCh Rd. Itauua Fme*. 

0277 127360 
DmBbjp 0277890389 

EquBtAo: <97-00 71340 » 670 252 

NJUWlU Are 9690 10360 - -t-2) 0*1 

Far Eart ACC 93X6 10040 - 7X0 0X9 

W wide Bond 5521 ax2 - 22P SXfl 

Piwyw 7058 78*9 - 152 14 

Eqtdiy income 72.12 77.13* - 0*6 43$ 


SUN LIFE OF CANADA 

R.d.- Ut a illaijuilit Hum RG2I 2DZ. 

Date 0256841414 

American Gib 3200 3423 - 155 Oto 

Managed Assets ioox* 1I7J7 - Ola 406 
UXlDCrene 32.49 J4TI! -0J6 4« 

UK Growth 23J7 3554 *026 309 

worldwide Oth sj* 26 1 si - aw ox* 


132X0 - 6K> 039 


SCHRODER UNIT TRUSTS LTD 
33 G refer Lane. I union BCZY8AS. CBraw 
■ras 0600 S28S3S. Brttar Bob 0808 S2* 5*0 

American ztaoo 237X81 - 759 074 

-dD-AK MQ88 2ST0* - 621 0.T4 

Attraatn 10699 11092 - 8)8 057 

dD-AK 121X6 IBM -028 057 

UK Enterprise 17X87 18846 * 2X5 409 

dD-AK 19663 21L87 » 416 409 

European G8) 5172 57 Jut - IX* 109 

-do- Are 55X1 5952 - IJI 1X9 

amsmarore 4706 $oB3t - 1.45 um 

-dD-AK 4UB 51-23 - IJ6 10* 

Mr Eastern cm 5403 57X3 -3X6 ... 

do-ACC 5490 5856 - 892 . . . 

rind Interest sow 53.73 * ois 7J» 

do-ACC 610* 6436 *018 7J9 

GOtlranme 1005$ U898 * 053 8X0 

do-ACC 135.95 14X38 * 071 8X0 

taoome 262-12 21959 -*.99 829 

dD-AK 79922 80953 *14X7 529 

Japan Enterprise *6J0 49J8 - 1.97 ... 

dD-AK 4630 49J8 - 1.97 ... 


TSB UNIT TRUSTS UD 
it—*— piuee. Andaaec Hanta 
0264 3*679* 

American 177.7* 189.08 

dD-AK 19521 207X7 

Britbb Gth 7609 8414 

dD-AK 9229 9618 

European 7673 8X76 

-do-Are 5X05 8635 

Ena tac 19**9 169X7 

-dD-AK 2S0J9 266J9 

General Unit 246J* 36206 

-do-ACC -MOD 511-10 

Income 288*1 30JX3I 

dD-AK 581 JO <1940 

Inte mail ormJ *260B *532St 

da- Are SSb.95 59250 

Padfie 3(605 28303 

-do- Are 278X3 29641 

Premier income 48X1 SOU 

dD-AK <9J5 HE. 45 

Nat Besnurces 73 31 77.99 

-<ta-Are 8(139 85J2 

SdeortOppS 8248 87.74 

-OO-Are ICC. 99 10456 


- 7X7 05* 
-aji as* 

* 2J5 658 
. 27* 238 

- IJD 0X8 

- 138 OM 

* 274 854 

* OO 83* 

* 1X1 292 

* XI4 292 

* 423 422 

* 8XJ 422 
-16X2 086 
-2148 086 
-201* 023 
-21 10 02) 

* 001 me 

* DO! 382 

- 17b .. 
-4 12 ... 

* 1.70 1.78 
< 212 1.78 


-l 1U 
.*W.7 


\ller.by cor 
liis high pr 


TARGET TRUST MANAGERS 
Onto Plate Andover, H ni a a att lu 
SPIO IRE. 8264 3*6747 
American Eagle 10660 114201 - 3J 


-.* \Jiii mu ITJ 

Hr* 


VKOtotV 
Hto-ACC 
USSmUrGss 
dD-AK 
world N 
dO-ACC 


30504 

-ULS4 


Aunralla 

5 783 

622 

- Q2J 

1 29 


305X6 

-10X6 



102.10 

17370 

* UO 

5.90 


740* 

- $00 0.75 

Eero Spec SJa 

12JJ0 

I XX 90 

- 260 

0X6 


7603 

- iM 

0.75 

FlcundaJ 

32.11 

3402 

• 007 

3X2 


15603* 

* 304 

1X8 

Global opfri Inc 

74.72 

79 OM 

- 205 

2X2 


179.73 

• 407 


-do-ACC 

7708 


- 395 

2J2 


80X9 

- 322 



34.72 

3720* 


1.43 


SUB 

- 324 


-dO-ACC 

66.17 

7X92 

- aos 

1.43 



7147 9050 - 122 ... 

762* 8122 - 324 ... 

18328 198X9 * 3J0 149 

33858 357.9* * 885 149 

109X1 11691* -092 ... 

109X1 116.91 -092 ... 
047 66X3 -033 243 

6856 6071 -035 243 


taeonte 10230 109J0T 

Japan General 10810 US. 00 

F t t fa e nu e 204* 2200 

UK Capital 41.93 96X0 

wreuwidecap 17650 issxo 

Woridtacotne 7lxo %«8 


iSmnrcre JOL40 107 JO - 3J0 ... 


FtadGon* 
do- Are 
Equity Ux 
do-Are 
High Yield 
-do-Are 


do-Are 
ppr Europe 


EAGLE STAR UNIT MANAGERS 
grab Hurt rhrttr Bun GL837LQ. 
0243577555 

OrtaraalOpACC «M0 619* -4 


BURRAGE UNIT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT LTD 
117 FcwchreriiSt Ixndnu EC3M5AL. 
071480 7216 

SUGIItFUIre 67.71 ABX1 -017 X06 


as UNIT MANAGERS LTD 
PO Bs 108 Manchester MMOAH. 

061837 506# 

Environ 11850 136. !t» *0.40 1.96 

US Grtlwtb 132X0 141.10 * IJD 242 

UK Income 104.40 116.40 » IJO 503 


UKttalncd tac 
"OthACE 

UK Growth Are 1 
UK High 10c 
do-Are 
N America Are: 
European Are 
UK Prof Fri Inc 
-do-Are 
Inn Sp Sta Are 
Emtronmntiopp 


-SJS 1J* 

- 22* ... 

• OlO 2X1 

* 1X0 2X3 

♦ i« 241 

* IJO 7X1 

• 220 7X1 

- 5J0 036 
-280 OJO 

- IJS 9X7 

♦ 023 9X7 
-230 027 
•(U* IX! 


GARTMORE FUND MANAGERS 
Guam Hmk 16718 MaiuimuB Street 
Loaders EC3R8AL 071 6 23 1212 
DeataF 02772*4421. Services 0800 289 336 
UK Growth funds 

Bttash Growth *091 43J5 * OJ* IJI 

cahTnar 12014 12014 • oil 6J3 
Proa tar me 91X4 9427 ♦ 047 435 

do-ACC 19864 209X0 • 100 4J5 

UE Smaller OH 7874 8L27 - 053 252 

Income Ftrods 

n eta nic e Share ZUO 28.71 * 006 9.15 
FOftl tac 27X7 28497 * 0X7 OlO 

UKEqutly hK IM.95 12291 * 1X7 309 
md Pill tat 27 Al 2440 - 079 602 

nnenraflt u iai funds 

MM 3826 $9J6 - 0J8 U2 

Frontier Marten 38X6 34J* - uto 0X3 

Global taC Gtt 10639 113X7 - 3X1 3-13 

MR tad 9849 HH0b -098 IJO 

Orerseas Funds 

American 1HX9 122AI - 4X4 0X6 

European 7L9I 7644 - IJO 090 

EnroSelOpps 8ZA* 8015 - L3D \M 
American Emerg 64.72 69407 -219 ... 

Hang Kong 8*48 90X0 -15J6 2J6 

Japan 1*651 |*<0] - 448 . . 

tactile Growth 1I7J4 12873 -1136 0X2 


EaroxaratNK 

9L56 

91 J2 

- 133 

345 

Omm Otowtb Fund* 




AmkxnGtb 

4&JB 

4707 

- L4I 

i.re 

Enropeafl Pert 

89X3 

9SJ0 

-318 

1X7 

■riO-AK 

91 Jl 

9X98 

- Z23 

1X7 

Finn Small ftvt 

1X93 

1803 

-005 

iji 

tICIXIl liKVWlh 

5826 

6323 

- 132 096 

-do Acc 

torn 

6500 

- U» 096 

HoasKAMna 

5006 

5405 

- 9X5 

1.45 

inn Growth 

43J9 

4X10* 

- 1.75 

1.15 

-dO-AK 

43-38 

1X101 


1.15 

Japan Peri 

ZU1 

2475 

- 12* 


Acctnn LWJa 

23JI 

24JS 



JtpaasmQrOi 

2462 

2X12 

- 075 


Singapore Asesp 

mu 

6395 

- 119 078 

-do Acc 

5908 

64-34 

-321 

aw 

scram EaflAfla 

17300 

187 JD 

-Ml 

100 

USSmQrOo* 

99 M 

lasjo 

- 120 


-40-ACC 

10020 

10X40 

- L2D 


OreoKS tncrane Rtrau 




Global Inc 

7008 

74J3X 

-.425 

306 

uni Sami 

51.13 

31.77 

- 101 

699 


second Gen 

dD-ACC 
Smaller CDS 
-do-Are 
Trustee 
C3wftxmd3 
CharUUnd 2 
PcnrioOKl 
NAAOFIIIC3 
-do- Are 3 


3900 41 JD . 0X0 015 

123.10 13010 * 1X0 635 

2040 3040 * 0X3 636 

48.10 47 JD ♦ OJO 436 

4450 51 JO * 090 4.94 

11600 12270 • £U 4.94 
43J0 48X0 *070 5X0 

80X0 4830 * UO 880 

31.10 32901 *040 821 

810400 ... t - om 098 

528.40 541.701 • 6X0 607 

7200 710X0 *11X0 813 
MLS ...t ... 480 

9773.75 ... ♦ 200 4X0 


N A PUNIT TRUST MANAGEMENT I3D 
35 Tnaaliai SL MiataKr M22AF. 

061 23 7 5322 

HAP UK Growth 62*2 6641 *0X1 3X4 

MFGhfMlro 7036 74.46 *010 7X9 

NAP Higher tac IS2J0 161X0 * 300 6U 

NAP UK Income 96.45 91*71 * U2 *XI 

NAP tad 75X3 41X17 - 0X6 2X4 

NAP Smaller Co? 5897 »X7 *027 255 


SCOTTISH AMICABLE UNIT TRUST 

MANAGERS UD 

IS# - *"arrnf Tl TTTaMtm f~l TTI1T 

•4I2MZ200 

Equity locsme rear 38.15 *0X2 1 

Equity Strategy 53J9 57J9 > 087 3 

Eaaupetn Oppa 6846 67J9 -ox* : 

Martmtan Hie 9983 KRAI * 0-10 t 

UK Smaller Ctn 3494 4L47 *091 2 


THORNTON UNIT MANAGERS LTD 
33 (UrAt S#, Inodan WIM7HF. 
#71493 7262 


.KitS Sic 

Vkni 
\ht % 

Vn&m 

it ii 


NEWTON FUND MANAGERS 
1 UadDB Bridge. Landau SEI 9RA. 
mi *07 4*0* 

General 13902 147.90 - 138 300 

Global 22842 23M1 - 442 1X6 

taco roe 174.10 1R71 -ox? 4X3 

tall Bond 11270 11980 -5X2 7.46 


3502 

3X15 

* Q£2 S2J ! 

Drabs 071 4938545 
AmerSmlQ* 76J0 

8IJ8 - 104 


* -. I 

5329 

5729 

• 087 209 

-CO- Acc 

7X70 

W.94 - 100 

* • 


6346 

67X9 

-024 322 

cam 

$0X1 

5051 • CUB 

7/0 * 


9901 

KH0l 

♦ OlO XJ» 

do-ACC 

6012 

*012 *006 

7/» 


3X9* 

4147 

• 051 380 

European oppa 

53X9 

5726* - 128 

1 " 





■do-ACC 

9418 

57.79* - 129 






.* m ■ 

iMdeuwL *1 


•uuiun urc iniuiMonis 

19 St Aadrere Sft, Efirtort 83) 2252211 
UX Equity 31410 3BM * 2X0 3J4 

American 2M.10 2)780 - 8.10 oas 

Padflc 3*3X0 26010 -1740 09* 

Eu ro pe an JtBJO 42300 -7.90 1.45 

WorfawMe 69J6 7407 - LI3 1.46 


PEARL UNIT TRUST 
PO Bat 500 Pefebmut 
0733470470. Dcallnr * 


MARKS fl SPENCER UNIT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT LTD 
PO Bta 410. CttHkr X. CHW9QG. 
fo&O 046 

lire POM tac 12100 12940 -050 297 

dO-ACC 13X10 14230 - 0X0 297 

ux income 96.79 msot • a 10 in 

do-ACC 10400 tlSJOt ♦ 1X0 in 


Growth 123X0 

do-Are 21X90 

toenrae 19100 

tad Equhy I84JQ 

do-Are 201.70 

Eouta 19440 

do- Are *02X0 

UK Inti 25 ACC 61X4 

UX Income 5X15 

UK S ml Lr CO Are 54.92 

New Europe Are S3J6 


LTD 

ft PE2tBR- 

626577. 

13000 * 1X0 ill 
225X0 * 2X0 818 
203X0 * UO 487 
19600 -8ta IJI 
214X0 -6J0 IJ3 
211007 -0X0 2X8 
427X0 *170 2M 
6857 ♦ 003 2X2 
56J* *057 X7B 
5142 * 075 2J9 
56X5 - 1.14 LSI 


SCOTTISH MUTUAL. INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT 

109 SI Yinceto SL G4 m#6w G25HN. 

041 2448100 

UK Equity 279X0 297 JC* * IJD 3X9 

UKSmCos Eroy 161 jd nixor • 2x0 i56 

European 257X0 306X0 - in 2X4 

North American 227 JO 2*1.90 -1100 072 

tanmeRntlnc 55X6 5843 *073 4X8 

UK Spec Sta 5059 6ZJ4 *015 2X5 


ftaEBBOppf 11808 125.95 - 415 077 

dt>-Aa 120X2 12487 - 035 077 

GubUNaLReS 29.79 31-77 - 106 ... 

dO- Are 30X4 32X8 - L£» ... 

Japan 5707 6079 - 1.91 ... 

dD-AK 5707 6079 - 1*1 ... 

Lene Dragons $**: 5403 - 4J5 0X6 

dD-AK 9X1 A5J - 4X6 056 

OrieroalincsRu: MM 36.9* - i7* 4J1 

do- Att 4171 44X2 - 146 4jl 

Itaer 172X5 1438* -1896 143 

dD-AK 18027 19128 -16.7= 1/0 

UK SOSriD CO* 51.78 5837 - 17? 2.94 

dD-AK 59J6 6347 • 114 2.M 


A iftite 

" ; “ -*i 

‘ wrliMBi 

'‘W 

*< ; 

■, V 
5 »>• u 
' • .imi 


CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
I (Bromic Way. WemMey. Middx HA90NR 
OSI 9028376 

SE Alia 6779 72JO - *J0 1.14 

Growth *1X5 *455 » 073 340 

hKeme 47.47 $077 « 073 5.10 

Far East 36.13 J&X* *• 258 QJ4 

North Anterkan 14JM 7943 - 12» 001 

Global 7143 78 J* - 209 I JO 

Eutopean 5482 6291 -075 125 

Japan 74D M3I - 3X2 «30l 

INI Currency Bd 529; .Vvtw -2*07.93 
UKCapGwib >8JM 73X2 • IJt UD 


EDINBURGH UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
DanaUm Hove. 97 HmnWDsnet 
Kdldtaiili EHI2 5 HD. 031 313 1000 






American 

9X15 

lasjor 

-4.10 


67 79 

72JD 

- 4 SO 

1.14 

UKSmtrcm 

14700 



1X0 

41X5 

44X5 

* 073 

340 


3108 




47.47 

5077 

. 073 

$.10 

MngdEiOTpt 

151.10 

157 50 

• 340 

3J3 


38X4 

* 3SB 

034 

Gromblnc 

19500 

338XD 

* 4J0 

4J3 


7903 

- U8 

OOI 

HIchDIa 

121.90 




73.43 

78J4 

*209 

IJD 

numrattojul 

2S4JO 

302JO 

-3JD 

108 

5X82 

6191 

- 075 

125 

InUInasroe 

7026 




7183 

84JI 

- 3J2 OOI 

tadfle 

4X46 

40J6I 

- 3X2 



5X09 

- 240 

7.93 

Smllr Jap an 

49x« 





73X2 

• IJS 

3SU 

TtHoro 

14X60 

IS4J0 

- 6X0 



GOVETT (JOHN) UNIT MANAGEMENT 
SfetMetuw Hmree. 4 Bate Bridge Ink 
L end— SEI 2HR. #71 37# 7979. 

Deabs^ 1715484526 
tad Growth 10841 11274 - SJ* OS5 

American Gth 10007 117J1 - 832 055 

European Clh 59A8 63J9 - 1.73 OSZ 

German Hottm 41.92 *4-7) - 1J2 092 

Japan GUI 5600 59X9 - 202 ... 

Pad Be tac 106.19 11157 - 4X9 3J2 

PariSc Strategy 45X8 91X6 - 7X4 ... 

UK Prog tac 66.73 71X7 - IJI 611 

Gl Brldsh CDs 4190 *696 • 009 200 

UK Small CUT 3*5* 369* - 051 260 


KLEDiWORT BENSON UNIT TRUST 
LTD 

18 Rrahu ntfc Street, feta Ed 
071 954 440#- DtsrBag: 871 9M7354 
£DtameUHi 
cash Are- 6800 6SJ«I *008 X59 

Extra incmue *829 4L1ST - QJI 7.99 

omindd ihl9o lauor - uo axi 

Global Income 16490 170701 - ISO 4.76 

HlflflTletd IISJD 12260 *010 7.12 

SmlfrC a sDre 38 21 S7.46T * 20! 7J7 

CRUGitHTran 

AmerSmBrCra 8052 8866 - 409 .. 

North American 7016 766* - 195 O 

European 114.10 121X0 - 2.70 0 

Euro Special 64X1 7123 - I J9 L 

General 317.70 26150 ♦ UO 1 


GRE UNIT MANAGERS 

36 Hatboar Eariurage Sn Ifedaw BI49GE- 

#715389668 

Chris 12800 124X0 *010 411 

GIB Fixed 11610 12310 *0X0X84 

Growth Equity 26130 241 JOT • 840 170 

GuaMUn 341*0 40BJ0 * 400 177 


AmerSmCrCos 8052 bm -409 ... 

Nanb American TOM 7a*« - 195 ojs 

European 114.10 121-40 - 270 094 

Euro Special 64X1 7123 - IJ9 U3 

General 317.70 26150 ♦ 110 165 

Japan 2 KUO 30030 -1000 ... 

Japanese Spread 1*4*0 1S7X0 - L*0 ... 

Master ACC 19100 XDJO - 180 1X2 

PhdflC 201.70 21400 -1500 0*3 

Smaller CO* 74.71 79091 *055 19) 

UK Equity Gth 3014 3206 * 099 109 


MARTIN CURRIE UNIT TRUSTS UD 
Safer Court JC Garik Terrace. EJUflregh 
EH I 2ES. HI 2295252 
Emerg bob 62.79 67 is - *jo 095 

far£8ri(PUCUK) lOLOO lOJJO -490 054 

tacumeGnrenb 62.95 6X821 * OM 403 

European 57 JO 6UM - un uo 

Nth American SJ07 5*00 - iJi ui* 

UK Growth 6 825 70327 ♦ 1-22 1.75 

tafl Growth 7809 7071 -*03 062 

Chance* 9sx* ioijdt * uo 4.76 

CntJ income . 5416 59X11 - 172 842 

Japan 3419 3MI - 1X1 015 


PERPETUAL UNIT TRUST 
48 Han Sara Heaky uw Thaw 
0491417000 

Asian Sot Or Mkr 6600 7L3 


PEP GUI tac 
InilGih 
Incflote 
Wwlije Becov 

Amen can cm 


4170 8445 

39122 420J6 
241JI 25030 
2)899 25140 
17322 18827 


I nil Emerg Cos 1J4J8 14422 
For East GUI 14490 15491 


MERCURY FUND MANAGERS UD 


LAS UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
M3 Dundas St E (flntegh EH35EB. 

HI 550 5151 

European UB 6729 - us 099 

Emataanoe 2101 210* * OJI 3X4 


dD-AK 

CM 

dO-ACC 

European Gib 

dD-ACC 

Garni 
dD-AK 
Global MS 


1 M. ECUL9AR. #71 28# 2S6# 
17030 I80SOT -6.10 ... 
18100 I430OT -6JD ... 
10080 10000 * OlO 7JS 
126X0 126X0 ♦ 020 7JS 
167.70 177X0 - 3X0 039 
17060 19020 - UO 039 
*1030 4*700 » 490 1X6 
78600 43490 • 900 14b 
12090 12700 - 4 JO 5-C 
132X0 139 JO - 490 5X2 
12300 131. 101 * IJO 855 
176.90 IMXOT • 170 5X5 
31490 3)5001 -1500 UM 
*1800 444 701 -Ii« IX* 


European Gth 
UX Growth 
High Income 
Japanese Gth 


94X9 10109 
6230 66X3 

67X3 72X6 

1444* 1540* 


-6X4 Ofl 

- IJ6 1-72 
-1307 099 

♦ 177 476 
-420 127 

- 7X7 001 
-17* 072 
-1036 037 

- I -23 IJS 

♦ OJO 173 

♦ OX* 854 
-817 001 


SCOTTISH PROVIDENT INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT LTD 
4 St Andrew S» Bfefewrgh E3U2YA. 

031 558 234 MU3 

Equity Gth AK 22X1 2402 • 014 171 
Inti Growth AK 23J4 24X4 - 044 L36 
doballncAtr 2706 2039* - 0X5 4J2 

Malta! LthxAK 2137 20] *028 171 


UNITED CHARITIES UNIT TRUSTS 
Harare fee. 2SZ RfeM Rd. London E7. 
0815345544 

tamed Ountlles 19900 21Z3TO * 1*0 506 


SG TOUCHE REMNANT 
McxsaM Hxc. 2 Puflfle Deck. 
BC4V1AT. 871 M8 1250 


WAVERLEY UNIT TRUST 

MANAGEMENT LTD 

13 Cbariocre So Edtamrgh EH24DJ. 

831 225 1551 

AtatnlunGcM 9.12 070 -oil 050 

FUCtilC Basts 2848 27.10 - 128 0X0 

Canadian Oh 2936 31-23 - 1.15 010 

Global Bond 509*7 10487 * 000 7X2 

Penny Share 16.49 17x4 , OU IJO 


9Mr. 


HOCKEY 


WHrmNGDALE UNIT TRUST 


PROLIFIC UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Watbroofc Hac. 23 RUtaMk. Loadan 


EC4N SLDl I 
InienunonaJ 
High iiitsxme 
Crerecm 
Far East 


ng: 08062X24*3 

147.90 15700 - 300 I J2 
9009 97X61 * 1X5 455 

97X2 1Q3.40T • 100 7X1 
23600 2H00 -14X0 OJS 


7X23 

37X5 

39.75 

79139 - 1S6 ... 
4009* -096 ... 
4205 - 10T . . 

MANAGERS 

2 Honey fee London EC2V SBT. 

071 6063132 


H27 

2725 - 104 ... 

CttyKnme 

55JS 

5526 - 006 

708 

25.96 

27.98 - 104 ... 

GDI Growth 

6290 

6507T . 00* 

161 

9001 

9X50 * 123 312 

GJIi income 

51-27 


10X60 

1 15201 - IJO ... 

SbonDtdGOl 

10X30 

107.70 

1.9) 

8X92 

95X3 *096 X7S 

US Gdrnuu Bd 

80698 


4926 

5X35 

KJM - 003 6J2 
«I.W -UB ... 

Challenger 

1536 

■7J5T - Z72 



cwerarasGft 61*6 67xn -202 ... 

Smaller Cd* 5833 5909T • 090 117 

Special Opps 73X3 7938 ♦ IJO 3J8 

WM Spec SIB 37.79 *0X7 -0*5 ... 

dD-AK 37X8 4096 -006... 


WOOLWICH UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
LTD 

I White Ort S *ac Swanky BUS 7 AG. 
SUCkmattalR) 6106 6816 * 044 155 


Havant 
can call 
on C ross 


f * • *i' 

r jfliTftJt 




:,.i- 


PROSPEHTIY UNIT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT 


I Seaiicra Use Sa Mata 
MEM IXX. 0622674751 


STANDARD LIFE 
MANAGEMENT L 


Ameftmn 

EmrejdngNto 


*501 47X1 - 1X9 0X1 
47.77 5381 - 3JM 028 


3 George SL ECataa]* EH2 2XZ. 

0660 393777 

Man ag ed 39X9 *2 is - 007 1.95 

Equhy G* Are S190 S1JI - OB* 101 


Source Ftnsta 

' YleM expressed as CAR (Compound 
Annual Return): tEx dMdmd: 1 Middle 
price; . . .3*0 rignincam oao. 


FT-SE VOLUMES 






AbDO.vail 60000 

Carlton Com Sit 

Land Secs 

UOO 1 

ABd-Lvons 

2MD 

Coats vy la 

2.400 

Legal ftGn 1.700 i 

xn<UtuiW 

to 2 

Cm Union 

585 

Lloyds Bk 

1.700 

Algl'IIGp 

3.700 

Counaolds 

mo 

MB Canln 

1JOO 

Aljowip 

9.900 

De U Rue 

515 

Moris spr 

5.400 

AB Foods 

5X4 

EnR China 

143 

NFC 

431 

BAA 

UT 

EnierprOU 

17b 

NUWst Bk. 

LSOQ 

BATlnds 

I.TOO 

Fbnns 

3.100 

Nat Power 

2JOO 

BET 

1.700 

Fone 

2.900 

Nth Wst W 

524 

BOC 

787 

GRE 

4jOOO 

NthmFds 

1,700 

BP 

5X00 

GUSA 

427 

PftO 

2J00 

BT 

4X00 

Gen acc 

1.000 

pennon 

132 

BTB 

2.400 

Gen Elec 

4X00 

PowerGcfi 

UOO 

Bk ctf Scot 

IjOOO 

Glaxo 

7X00 

prudential 

1,400 

Barclays 

xooo 

Granada 

UOO 

RTZ 

806 

Boss 

2.7W 

Grand Met 4JOO 

Rank Ois 

581 

Blue aide 

1.700 

Guinness 

1300 

Reddncol 

UOO 

Boots 

1,700 

HSBC 

14000 

Redland 

721 

Bmaicr 

020 

Hanson 2x000 

Reed mil 

UOO 

Brit Alrays 3J00 

ia 

UOO 

RenrokU 

UOO 

Bril Gas 

3X00 

Indtrapc 

3.700 

Reuters 

350 

Bril Steel 

4.900 

Kingfisher 1.000 , 

Rolls Royce sjoo 

Buimab Cstri 172 

Kwwsavc 

605 

Rothmans 

UOO 

Came wire 

IJOO 

LASMO 

4.400 

Ryl Bk Scot 9,700 

Cadtiuiy 

1X00 

Lad broke 

3.700 

sainsbuiy 

677 J 


Scot Hydra sss 
Scot ft Non \3X> 
Scot Power l.lOO 
Seas 6,000 
Svra Trent uoo 
SMI Trans 3.900 
Slebe 2J00 
SmKl Bdl 5J00 
Smith Nph 2.700 
Smith (WH) 389 
sthem Elec 390 
Sun Allnce 499 
TIGp 1J00 
TSB 3J00 

Tale ft Lyle 533 
Testa 6500 
Thames W 631 
Thm EMI 738 
Tomkins 7.800 
Unilever ZIOO 
Utd Btsc 1000 
VotJa/one l.lOO 
Wellcome 652 
whUhd'A* ijoo 
W ilms HW 1.700 


New Yoik (midday): 

Dow Jones 3284.90 (*8.37) 

SAP Composite 431.22 (*1.3 1) 


SAP Composite 431 22 (*1.3 1) 

Tokyo: 

NOdeei Av'ge 1729549 (*35.61) 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 5268.1 (-289.89) 

Amsterdam: 

CBS Tendency 105.6 (eam*) 

Sydney: ao i435J(*i.4) 


FTSE Euro 100: 

Brussels: 

GeneiaJ 

Paris: cac 

Zurich: SKA Geo , 


1052.78 (-2J3) 


5549.18H3J7) 
- 474.82 (-0-34) 
399.8 (*2J| 


FT-SE 100 

PrerioiBopen imeresc 44709 


Opes High Low OoseVataae 


2790.0 2794.0 2766.0 2768J) 6041 

2818.0 28180 27990 27950 1216 


Exchange index compared witlj 1985 was up at 80.7 
(day’s range 80.7-81 J). 


Three Month Stating 

Previous open intense 249727 


London: 

FT A All-Share 

FT 500 

FT GoW Mines 

FT Fixed Interest 

FT Govt Secs 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


-. 1522.16 (-1034) 


SEAQVotume 

USM (Datastrm) 


. 130803 (-330) 
. J 458.44 1-2-53) 

71-6 (-02) 

_ 10837 (*0J1) 

— 93.63 (*0J7) 

25696 

676.1m 

- 11630 (*034) 


Three Mth Eurodollar 

Previous open intense 29070 

Three Mth Euro DM 

Previous open interest 430383 


92.38 

92.91 

92.84 

92M 

93.60 

93.64 

93JI 

93.53 

93.70 

93.78 

93.61 

93.61 

96.18 

96.18 

96.17 

96.18 

96.17 

96.17 

962)9 

96.15 

91 15 

91.19 

91.10 

91.15 

9122 

92J0 

92.19 

92JZ3 


•t-Vys 

. a. 

.b ii* - 


Mb Rales for Dec 4 

ABBterdam 

Bnnsefa- — ____ 


US Treasury Bond 

Previous open intense 767 


LongGSt 

Previous open interest 62099 


100-03 2304 

99-17 25766 


Japanese Govmt Bond 


- /FRApmOWAC 


first Dealings Last Dealings LaaDedaraiion For Semlemem 

November 23 December 4 Febraaiy25 Man* 8 


Call opliaitg ft«re takes oat oa 4/12/92; ASDA Group, BeOerwaie. Ciesi Nicholson. 
Gardiner Croup. Kunkk. Jaidine Math. Proteus 1ml. Rhino. 


German Govnu Bond 

Previous open buensc 155599 

Three month ECU 

Previews open interest 12929 

Euro Swiss Franc 

Previous open interest 42575 

Italian Govral Bond 

Previous open interest 2 1050 


Dec 92 - 
Mar 93 

91 JO 
91.77 

91.24 

9182 

91-03 

91-60 

9im 

91X2 

27780 

38686 

Dec 92 _ 
Mar 93 

88.99 

91.00 

89.14 

91.13 

88.99 

91.00 

89.12 

91.07 

957 

830 

Dec 92 .. 
Mar 93 

93.66 

94.46 

93.73 

9407 

93-58 
94 J8 

93J8 
94 JO 

1462 

3797 

Mar 93 
rim 93 _ 

93.60 

93.82 

93-04 

9 3.09 
93.64 

6405 

0 


Frankfurt 

Lisbon 

Madrid 

Milan - . 

Montreal 

New York 

Oslo-. 

Paris 

Stockholm 

Tokyo 

Vienna 

Zurich 

SmausEael 


4 Range 

2.7859-23067 
50.99-51.42 
9 -6030-9.6880 
0.93290.9350 
2-4803-2.4972 
220.17-222.79 
176.13-179.60 
217730-2193.10 
1.9916-20171 
13590-1.5850 


Cline 1 mooch 3 math 
27868-27965 S w-‘ids l'«-]>ads 
51X12-51.13 5-1 Ids I9-28ds 

9.6140-9.6370 12*^14'^ 22V26>*ds 
0.9321-0.9345 I 79-348ds 27(^647dg 
24866-24898 1‘rMapr '«pr«u- 
220-55-221.18 335-4563* 687-]60Sdi 
177.70-178.70 I49-I68ds 3S5-420ds 

81.30-21 87.70 14-I7ds 37-42ds 


^’.VSSTfeHT 


24866-24898 

22035-221.18 

177.70-178.70 

2181.30-2187.70 


1.9941-1.9962 02O027ds 0J6O.47ds 
15595-1 J605 0.4 l-0.40pr 125-123pr 
10.1280-10.1520 20V36 1 u£ 2544ds 


8-4330-8.5050 
10.6320-10.6860 
1 94 32-1 97 21 
17.41-17-57 
22214-22375 


8.4910-8.5050 

10.6350-10.6590 

194.70-194.99 

17.43-17.48 

22344-22375 


2'a-2 , ads 7-Sdf 

4-4 J *ds 10'v-l Pads 

Vjpr l’t-1 ’zpr 

2 '2-3' ids 5V7fig 

'♦pr-par -*a- , *pr 


Premium ■ pr. Discount ■ 


liftr/Uv‘4 
f • - 


LIFFE OPTIONS 




Calls Pros 
Srttes Jm Apr M Jaa Apr 

ADd I,yon.. 600 4S 63 71 9 17 

pbJOl 650 17 34 4 5 30 38 

ASDA 50 7 10 12 4 6 

f*S.V:l 60 J's 6': 8 'j 10 13 

Has— — 550 5b 62 b9 9 19 

(*601) 600 19 36 42 29 45 

Boats 500 37 50 6) 9 14 

P524'd 550 12 24 34 33 39 

Br Airways 260 24 33 39 8'j 15 

P2T41 2S0 13 23 29 IS 15 

BP 200 33 35 36 2 4»i 

("228'it 220 17 20 24 6 10 

240 6 II 15 16 21 

BrSted — 50 4 I’M'i 2*i 4 >j 

(*571 60 4 7 10 7 9 

CftW — 600 M 77 91 7 14 

PMH 650 27 4S 60 24 34 

CU 550 5b 66 73 6‘i 18 

pSSS'tl bOO 23 35 46 25 43 

Counauld. 500 55 66 77 7 15 

rS47's) 550 24 36 4 6 25 54 

GKN— 390 36 43 48 b'a 17 


Crib PUs 

Scries Feb May Aag Feb May Aug 

BAA 7S0 67 87 47 14 24 32 

P794'il SOO 36 56 66 37 4 4 57 

BATIod- 950 54 66 80 30 53 60 

P962»j) 1000 32 43 57 5? 82 87 

Bill 500 36 42 50 13 23 26 

(*5151 550 II 19 2S 41 52 55 

BrAero— 140 16 26 27 18 26 30 


fl33'a) 160 11 18 2! 32 37 43 
BrTdcuL— 390 30 39 46 9 13 19 


S IZ'sl 420 lb 25 31 18 32 

rid Mel. 420 15 27 39 22 31 

(•420) 460 4'a 13 24 53 58 

ICI 950 107 123 132 7 28 

(*1037*4 1000 64 85 103 20 49 

1050 40 56 76 40 77 
Kmdbfar- 550 44 63 68 II 20 
(•5801 600 15 33 41 35 43 

Lmforate- 180 16 22 30 II 21 

Plfll't) 200 7'i 14 21 24 33 

Land S ol- 340 35 44 48 3'a b‘* 

Nib's) 420 14 24 28 13 1 7 

MSS— -330 IS 2b 31 II 15 
P333) 360 b 13 18 28 34 

SdmsboQ- 500 43 53 62 7 14 

C534'*) 550 14 25 35 31 38 

Shell 500 51 54 61 2>a 9 ‘j 

rS40) 550 15 20 3 ! 20 33 

SmUB<h- 500 31 41 S3 13 23 

t*ia . S50 10 18 30 47 53 

Snrehx-JSO 16 20 25 S 12 
PI89'i) 200 7 12 18 18 22 

Trafxtair— 80 7'a 9 12 4'« 6 >j 

P84) 90 3'a 5«s 8 9 12 

Unflewr- 1050 38 57 72 24 3S 

{•1053'd UOO 16 33 48 S3 t»8 

Utd B«c- 330 33 39 42 4*i 13 

(•357) 360 13 20 28 15 27 


Nil 1 *) 420 13 23 30 24 28 33 

Cadfawy— 460 25 31 39 19 31 35 

N58'a) 5<U JD 15 24 47 58 61 

GuinnBL.. 500 47 58 61 12 22 26 

rS25‘j) 550 20 30 40 36 47 51 

GEC 260 13 20 23 10't I3 'j 20 

Kbl'iJ 280 5'» M 14 24 26 31 

Hawn— 220 14 18 20 6 l > 12 13 

n27‘!} 240 5‘i 9 12'a 20 22 25 

LASMO- 160 17 23 29 [2 20 24 

TKH'jl 180 10’z 16 22 25 33 35 

Lucas 130 19 25 27 14 19 22 

(•133'd 140 16 21 22 19 25 28 

PftO 460 34 45 51 29 48 56 

N60) 500 18 27 35 52 75 82 

Paango— 70 15 19 24 6 9'i II 


AbtyNar. 360 
(*366) 390 

Amorad 25 

P2» 30 

Barebjs— 360 
P383'i) 390 

BfaeCbc- 160 
ri69» 180 

BrGas — 260 
r278) 280 

Dixons 260 

p66*j) 2 SO 

Eureann]., 330 


«38'») 360 

farte-.-... 160 


Forte 160 

ri68'a) ISO 
GteD ISO 


r823 > 4 800 

HSBC 460 


(•78) 80 II >2 15 18 12i4'a 19 

PnatemsaL 280 25 29 32 7'i 15 18 

P29J| 300 M 18 22 17 25 28 

RTE- 600 70 77 85 II 24 31 

P651) 650 34 47 59 28 4? 54 

Scot New. 390 26 35 40 17 22 28 

NOI) 420 12 22 26 37 40 47 

Tesm 240 25 31 34 7 12 14 

(■255) 260 13 19 24 15 22 24 

Thames W 460 40 49 53 10 M 22 

J*483'a) 500 17 27 32 26 34 43 

Vodafone- 390 34 44 54 16 24 32 
rwa 420 19 30 38 32 38 45 


FT-SE INDEX (12761) 

2650 2100 2750 2800 2850 2900 


HSBC 460 

{M69» 500 

Hfertanu. 110 

ELZ *2 

UAUXk) OU 

M^md_ 4W 
r6J5) 500 

Reuter — 1350 
r>3S2>i} 1400 
R-RoytK— . 100 
pios'i) iio 

Seen 90 

P96W (00 
Thru Enn. 800 
r83l'i) 850 

TSB 140 

CM5! 160 
VaaJReet- 30 
PSM) 35 
WeDconx 1000 
Cl 036 '0 1050 


CttSs 

Dec Mar Jsa 
15 27 31 
4 12 18 

4 S'* 6 

I 1>2 2 

30 42 45 

10 24 28 
15 29 33 

6>a 19 24 
23 29 31 
6>i 16 19 
14 27 36 

5 19 26 
30 52 62 

11 33 44 
17 26 30 

6 17 2] 
79 100 122 
38 65 92 

26 53 59 
10 34 41 
10 20 24 
5‘a t5 19 
14 16 17 

7 10 12 

197 - - 

156 - - 

42 97 127 
22 70 100 
9'i I4'i 16 
4 l i 10 12 

8 14 15 

3 7’i 10 

44 62 81 
13 35 55 

9 15 17 
2 S'i 9 

3'i 5 5 
l'i 3'i 4 
56 97 120 

27 68 93 


Ftas 

Dee Mar Jua 

6 20 24 
28 39 42 
Mi Ma 2 

3 3 3'i 

4 21 24 
17 37 42 

4*i (4 22 
14 24 33 
2 6 IO'i 

6'a 12 20 

7 17 24 
16 28 34 
6 22 29 

23 38 45 
3*ilMa 20 
14 24 32 
4 23 33 

14 42 57 

15 35 46 
40 56 69 

4 10 17 

8 16 23 

Mi 5 •: 7 


REPORT: The ba/tey market moved in union with the wheal 
maricei but again failed to stimulate the same volume as the 
spec interest was not involved. White sugar futures were 


< ; |i"Y . . miuio nuc 

marginally tower in quiet conditions. Robusta coffee futures 
came under pressure from pre-weekend profit- taking to finish 
with pared gains on key positions. 


IC1S-LOR (London 6-OOpm): Following the 
w eek's sharp falls, the trade fob that a slight 
correction might be in Older. 


4'x 10 13 


LONDON POX 
„ COCOA 

Dee 69S-&92 Mar 812-810 

Mar 721-720 May 828-823 

May 737-736 rid 842-838 

JJil 753-750 Sep 855-854 

Sqi 768-765 

Dec 789-788 Volume 2301 

ROBUSTA COFFEE ft 

ian 1000999 Sap 1005-995 

Mar 1010-1009 Nov 1020-1005 

May 996-995 inn 1035-1010 

3ul 1000-998 Volume 4540 

RAW SUGAR (FOB) 

$: C ??£ am Oa 195.4-93.4 


„ GNI LONDON 
grain futures? 

WHEAT 

RteeD# 

J«i 132.10 

Mar 133.70 

May 135.85 

Am 136.95 

Sep 105.90 

Volume: 545 


CRUDE OILS (STferrd. FOB) 

Brent Physical — 18-25 *0.10 

Brent 1 S day (Ded — 18.40 *0.15 

Brent 15 day (Ian) 18 JO *0.10 

W Texas Intermediate Gan) - >9.15 *0.05 

W Texas ImmiKdjaie (fcb) 19-25 *0.0S 


„ PRODUCTS own 

SpotCIFNW Eta up* (pi o BipC d tlimj ) 
Premium Cbs. 15 — Bat 192tn/<5 Offer 194 Jn/c* 

Gasoil EEC I70f*I 171 1*1 

Non EEC 1H Dec — 175 *1 176 j*l 

Non EEC IHhui — 175 *1 176(*1 

3.5 FW Oil 77 -2 78 (-2 

Naphtha 174 *2 176 f*2 


Argentina peso* 13475-1.5502 

Australia tfoUar . . 224 70- 1 •’502 
Bahrain dinar _ ___ 0.592-0-60 1 

Brazil cruzeiro • 161 73. 1-16 173.4 

Australia 1.4413-1.4423 

Auana 11.17-11.19 

Belgium (Com) _ 32.71-32.75 

Canada 12775-12880 

Denraaric — . _ 6.16-6.17 

Finland maria 7.9275-4.0075 

Creese drachma 32527-329.73 

Hong Kong doflar — J2.070-J2.080 
India rupee 4530-45.96 

Germany 1^90-1.591 

Hong Kong ... 7.7425-7.7435 

Ireland 1.670-J .673 

Kuwait dinar KD 0.4 700.4 77 

Malaysia ringgh 3.9S-3.97 

Italy - 1 397.0-1402^) 

Mexico peso . _ .48004900 

New -Zealand dollar — 3.0096-3.0 1 75 

Saudi Arabia riyal 5,8865-5.9735 

Singapore doflar 2J558- 2.559] 

S Africa rand ffei) 72697-7.4477 

Matajm 2J386-2.5396 

Netherlands 1.787-1.792 

Notway _ 6.49-6.50 

Portugal . 14 125-141.75 

Singapore 1.6394-1.6404 

l) A E dirham __ 5.769-5, 850 

Batches Bank GTS ’ Lloyds Bank 

Sweden 6.82-6.83 

Swmerland 1.427-1.428 


• -.Sir 


' Jr;..... 


4<.ttcs*l0w; 

*- t-.; 


MONEY HATEsT%) 


Spot 189.6 Dec - — unq 

Mar — 192.0-87.0 Mar ono 

May — 195JV93.0 May uoq 

Aug 1954-93.0 Volume 18 

WHITE SUGAR (FOB) 

, Oa 249.9-48-5 

7V1 C n men r. mm r 


26 67 95 
58 95 122 
3 912«a 
7'» 15*i 17*i 

34 6 9 

7 12 14 
6 25 32 

Z6 50 57 
3 10 11 
U 22 23 
24 5 5 

54 S 8 
14 42 58 

35 65 83 


BARLEY 

(duseE/D 

tan 130.70 

Mar. 13255 

M#y 134.70 

Sep 10550 

Nov Kjg.OCI 

Volume 170 


IFE FUTURES 
GNI Lid 


Base Ratrt Clearing Banks 7 Finance Hse 8 

Disconc Market Lone o/njght nigh; &>< few 4 

Treastny BBb (Dis)3uy: 2 mth 6".. : 3 mih 6"i* . Sell: 2 rmh 6-»; 


Wirt fixed: 6'< 
3miH:6V. 


^ I70J5SLE Mar — 171^5-71.50 

_ 17150 BID Apr 169.50 SLR 

17X50-72.75 May — 168.5069.00 
V<* 14696 


Sptx: 250 j Dec 2So!CM85 

Mar — 2533-53.0 Mar — 25333-50 S 


™ “■ — rami — 

May __ 256.4-55.7 May _ 257.0-515 
Aag — 2623361.5 Vote*: 291 


December 4. 1992 Toe 3338S Calk 1 1956 
PH# 1 1432 FT-SE Cttft 3961 Pac 7623 
•Uaderijfeg aeaottf price 


Cafe 

Da 

133 

83 

50 

26 

10 

4 

fan 

172 

122 

89 

65 

42 

27 

Feb 

196 

ISO 

127 

95 

75 

50 

Mar 

_ 

171 

140 

114 

- 

71 

hn 

- 

281 

- 

215 

- 

148 

Pn* 

Dec 

7 

11 

24 

53 

95 

133 

Jan 

30 

39 

60 

86 

106 

14] 

Feb 

44 

61 

62 

97 

125 

158 

Mar 

56 

73 

92 

108 

- 

166 

Jim 

- 

100 

- 

130 

“ 

18b 


Series Ian Apr rid lea Apr Jal 

Peons 200 34 45 54 9 16 24 

(•22141 220 23 36 43 (6 27 34 

Stria Feb May Aag MiMayAo# 

EsriRi Elc. 370 42 50 - 8 13 - 

P40V-4 400 23 33 - 20 26 - 

Series Pec Mar Jm Dee Mar Jan 

Nad Pwr_ 260 23 29 36 2 84 I i 

KBOt 280 8 IS 25 74 17 21 

Scot Pwr- 220 ID 14 20 3 8 10 

r227\ 240 14 64 It 15 20 22 


MEAT* LIVESTOCK COMMISSION 
Awn 9® fafltack prices ai representative 
. _ . . rettrkfifc on December 4 

5*8™) Pfe Sheep Otafc 

Gft 83J6 BL29 112.92 

_WH -3^1 *4.93 *0.12 

Eng/Waks S3^b 8)J3 11195 


hhtosoya 

Wosrtrt) 

Dec 1*730 

F*6 — 147 JO 

Apr 146 JO 

Am 138-50 

Aug 1 39 Jo 

Votame 400 


BRENT (6.00pffl) 

I8J3-18JJ Apr 18.17-18.19 

18J 1-18-22 M#y 18J0SLR 


Local Authority Peps 
Stating CDs 
DoBarCDs 


1 mth 

2 mth 

3 Bah 

Anh 

12 mih 



6"^. 

A'.-C* 


Tm* n m 

7V7 

7V7 


bW. 

7V7 

Zi. 

7V7 

7V7 

6«*4rt. 

6'W. 

7 

n/a 

7 

6“* 

6“* 

Zir6-n 

7'tob^s 

7-6"* 

6“retf. 

6 , ’-6V 

3.93-388 

n/a 

3.66-3X1 

3.73-3X8 

4.15-4,10 

7 , b-6*m 

7Sr6-« 

7W» 

6"«6 U » 



^ •/>: ^ 


* »*:W*Ti i 

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POTATO 

ffflj Open CJob: 

Apr 64.0 62_8 

May 700 68.4 

Apr unq g9i! 

Voknne b2 


_ JSJ8-18-20 VoL 27604 

UNLEADED gasoline 

190.7542.00 Mar 197.00 SLR 

190-OMI-25 Apr nla 

_ 193 JO SLR Vofc 25 


4pplc a:L565m allotted: ClOOm: Bids E98.40*t received: 45%: 
Ltatwwfc EW_»% received: 100%: Avge nle: tfi.4035 % last wrtu.4577%: Next week: 


sr. 


S ) -3JI H.74 -027 

«I8J -9J -43.4 


™ — *I8J -9J -43.4 

Scodaid: n/ a Sl^S 1 12.1 1 

Kri n/a *5.95 -1.67 

TO nJa -55J) -82.9 


RUBBER 

NolRSSGfl 


6TWhLsO 


BIFFEX 

CNILldfflOW 

Dec 92 Hide 1320 Ltrar. 1312 Ctase: 1319 
Jan 93 1289 1289 1289 

Ftb93 aaq unq 1273 

Apr 93 .unq unq 1257 

VoL 22 lots. Open infst 3366 Index 1337-5 


European money deposits au 


Curreocy 

Dollar 

Detaschemaric 
French Franc 
Swiss Franc 
Yen: 


7 day 

I mth 

3 noth 

6 mth 

can 

>z« 

4-3'. 

JVJ'j 

3V3S 

3L-Z. 

H’i 


W. 

8V84 

9 , *8’. 

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KTi-IOS 

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3V3'» 

3‘V3*. 

3V3*! 

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.. " 

*. - Alt/ 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
LiwHlVfcd 

Open Ckee Open Ckse 

}0f5 104.0 M^-IOSU 105 J) 
Apr — 104 J 104 J Volume 9 


(OfEcM (Votame pic* daj) 
Copper Cde A Jrtonnej 
Lead (E/ltmnej - 


ancSMcHiCde(SftOBreS 
TinStoirei 


Afominium Hi Ode S/umnd 
Nickel (S/taine*: 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE Rudolf Woffi 

-Casta 1 387 J-l 388.0 3Mta 14 10.0-14 1 14) Vofc 602475 

293.00- 293 JO 30 100- 303 JO 46800 

106833-106921 1085.0-1085 J 328975 

5765.0- 5770.0 5820.0-58252) 15480 

1 1715-1 179.0 1202.0-1 202 J 708225 

5545.0- 55S02) 564021-5645.0 49224 


GPU) AH&raECiPOS METALS {Bal iti&Co) 


BoSorc Open 5335.65-335 95 Close J335J0-335.90 High; S335J5-33WJ5 
l*w. 8335235-33 5J5 KragemnL 5135X0337 DO (£214.75*215.75) 

Sovereigns; Old S79 JO-82.90 (t50.75-52J5) New $79304250 (LSO.75-52.25) 
Ptadaum.- $?6SOO (L232.I0) SDrer; $3.76 X2.415) PafladaDn: $103.00 (£65-50) 


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i 




THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 


5 1992 


SPORT 27 


GOLF 


Dispute bugs Faldo 
as he surrenders 


second-round lead 


UNSETTLED by a rules dis- 
pute involving Ernie Els, his 
playing partner. Nick Faldo 
slipped two shots off the pace 
after the second round of the 
Million Dollar Challenge in 
Sun City, South Africa. 

The British golfer, the over- 
night leader after a first-round 
69, ended two shots adrift of 
the three joint leaders, Els, his 
fellow South African. David 
Frost, and Nidc Price, of 
Zimbabwe, who were on 139, 
five under par. 

The controversy arose on 
the 2nd hole. Faldo objected 
when Els used his putter to 
brush away a beetle sitting on 
the line of his putt Tourna- 
ment officials ruled later that 
under local regulations, the 
action was acceptable, al- 
though in Europe or the 


Bv Our Sports Staff 


United Stales a penalty stroke 
would have been impnepri 

Faldo, Upset that nffirifllo 
had not resolved the dispute 
until the end of the round, 
said;'* If somebody bad known 
the bloody rules they could 
have told us straightaway and 
it would have been no prob- 
lem at alL There was nothing 
wrong with what he [Els] did. 
If they could have told me that 
straightaway it would have 
been over and done with and 
we could have got on with it 
Pathetic. 

“You can brush a bug off 
your line [with a dub] over 
here but not in Europe or 
America. Obviously, you've 
got man-eating bugs over 
here.” 

Faldo said he was not 
allowing the right amount of 


Allenby confirms 
his high promise 


From Mitchell Platts 
GOLF CORRESPONDENT, IN MELBOURNE 


ROBERT Allenby provided 
further evidence of his grow- 
ing maturity when, by compil- 
ing a second round of 68, he 
captured the halfway lead in 
the Johnnie Walker Classic on 
die Royal Melbourne course 
here yesterday. 

His total of 1 34, ten under 
par, gave him a two-shot 
advantage over fellow- Austra- 
lian, Mark Allen, who com- 
pleted his round of . 66 
following a violent thunder- 
storm which halted {day for 
100 minutes. Colin 
Montgomerie, who had 
shared the lead with Allenby 
after the first round, fell back 
with a disappointing 73. 

“1 hope that is my bad 
round out of the way," 
Montgomerie said. "I certain- 
ly have no intention of shoot- 
ing over par again and I still 
feel that I can win the tide.” 


Jamie Spence, the European 
Masters champion, is on 141 
and Steven Richardson a shot 
further bade after a 68. 

Allenby, 21, was runner-up 
in the Australian Open on this 
course a year ago while still an 
amateur and many believe he 
is his country’s b est prospect 
since Greg Norman. 


LEVXNG SECQMMKXJND SCORES 
(Australia unleu staled): 134: R Altrt*, 
66. 68. 138: M Mon. 70, 66. 137: M 
Harwood, 69, 88. 198: L Waste. 70. 68; T 


Pifce. 71. 07; V Sirah (Efl), 71, 87. 139: C 
matte (GB), 66. TO;w Grady. 69, 70; 


Mortpom. .. . . 

W HBey. 73, 88. 140: D k*jwfc (Can). 70. 
70c S Bouiter, 68. 72; R PfcSf. 70. 70. 141: 
J Spence (GBLTI, 70: R Batfowl, 69, 7% 
C Wwun. 71. TO; M Long (NZ), 67. 74; A 
Magee (US), 70. 71; 14£ M Conrdid, 74. 
68; A Palmer. 73, 88: F Nobio (M2, 68. 73: 
J Van de Velde JR}. 74, 68; Kyjjte Han 
(Bums), 71 , 71; S Rxhatxfeon (GB). 74, 68: 
§0*1*1 no. 71 , 71 ; C Van der Vbtte (Hrtfc 
09, 73: U Barry. 74, 88. 143: WSrrtth. 72. 
71; OSWs (Port). 71. 72 D Mactanzie, 72. 
71; P Senior. 72,71; MCatawaccfiia (US). 
72. 71 :L Parsons. 72. 71 ;M Oates (G8J, 74, 
88; 0 hnsah^Smsh, 7Z 71; R Onk. 70. 73. 
Other British acorn: 14& M Mackenzie. 
74, 71. 148: G Bona. 71 . 75. 148: R Boat. 
73.75. 


HOCKEY 


Havant 
can call 
on Cross 


By Sydney Friskin 



EAST GrinsteacTs next two 
matches in the Pizza Express 
National League, at home 
today to Havant and away to 
Hounslow on December 12, 
will be important to their 
chances of winning the title as 
the leading contenders jostle 
for position at the top of the 
first division. 

East Grinstead's middle 
line should be more secure by 
the return of their talented 
young wing half, Ravi Vudi, 
from injury today. Havant, 
level with East Grinstead and 
four points behind the leaders. 
Hounslow, may again have to 
omit the injured Cunlifle but 
can now call on Cross, who 
was absent from their attack 
last week. When the teams met 
at the end of last season, 
Havant virtually secured the 
title with a 7-1 victory. 

Although Duthie had recov- 
ered from injury last week to 
play for Southgate, second on 
goal difference to Hounslow, 
he is unavailable for today’s 
trip to Wdton. now looking 
more co nfiden t after a 2-1 win 
over Canterbury- 

Stoorpoffs captain and 
goalkeeper. Steve Taylor, who 
pulled a hamstring m the 
previous match, will have a 
fitness test before the away 
game against Slough, who 
could prove tough opponents. 
Stouiport, in third place, are 
fadin g the absence of their 
centre half. Mark Harradine, 
$uQ under suspension. 
position is Sited by the Wdsh 
international Owen Jonffi, 
and Roberts is available after 
recovering from 
Stourport meet Southgate 
next weekend. . 

Except for the injured Haz- 
1m. Hounslow will be at hdi 
strength at home agamstst 
Albans, who were beaten 6-0 
last week by East Gnnstead. 
Teddington. who host 

BournviUe. have a J? 1 

ground to make up. So mo 

have OMLoughtomans. who 

visit Surbiton. 

Reading, five points dear at 

the top of the second drv^n, 

are unlikely to be troutitedty 

OM Kingstonians. Tnar 

nearest rivals. 
khana and Barford 
should have few problems 
against moderate Opposition. 


FOOTBALL 

&0 unless tmad 

FA Cup 

Frrstround replay 

Sa&bury v Marta* 

Second round 
Accrington Stanley v Crewe 
(at Blackburn Rovers FC).. 
Altrincham v Port Vale 

(aU ticket) 

Boton v Rochdale. 

Brightonv 
Burnley v 5 

Cheltenham v Bournemouth 

(a> ticket) — 

Exeter v Swansea 

GDBngham v Colchester 

MacdesfiekJ v StxxSkport 

(aitictafl 

Marine v Stafford 

(ad ticket) — - 

Reading v Leyton Orient (7.15)— 

Rotherham vHuP .... — 

Wigan v Buy 

Yeovil v Hereford 

Premier League 

Coventry v Ipswich ....... 

Crystal Palace v Sheffield Uttl — 

Leeds v Ntottm Forest .... 

Middlesbrough v Blackburn - 

Norwich v Wtmbtedon 

OPR vOldhsm. 


Sheffield Wed v Aston Wla. 
Southampton v Arsons 


Tottenham voticnwei 

(an ticket) - 

Barclays League 
Rret division 

Birmingham v Brentford 

Bristol Rovers v Luton — 

Cambridge Utdv Wolves- 

Chariton v Portsmouth 

(dl ticket)-. 

Grimsby v Leicester 

Milwailv Southend 

Notts CourSy v Newcastle 

Sunderland v Barnsley 

1,1 -»* — — * ■■ DrMni 


OUIW3 noiiu y — 

Watford v Bristol City 

Second division 

Fumarn v Mansfield — 

Third cfivlsion 

Halifax v Barnet— 

Autoglass Trophy 
First round 
Chester vDwstertteld. 


Scarborough v Carfisie . 


GM Vauxhall Conference 

Dagenham and Redbridge v 
Gat^^dv^mborough 

Kettering v Weffing 

KjddertTHnsterv Sough — 

Northwichv Runcorn 

Telford v Boston. — 


Scottish League 
premier dhritfon 

Aberdeen v St Johnstone . — — 

Dundee v Hibernian 

Hearts v Airdrie..— 

Motherwell v Faikitk. — 

PartckvCeftG..-- 


rEBUCIS Y VOT— 

Rangers v Diroee Utd.._ - 

First cflvlsion 
AyrvStMinwi... 


,.P 


Dunbarton v Duitermfine 

Hamilton v CMdebank..— 

Morton v® 6 *"- 

Raih v 


Tennents Scottish Cup 
First round 

Forfar v Alston — - 

Huntfy v Stranraer. - - 

Inverness TTxstiev 

CM Service Strollers (2.19 

Queen ol South v Sparer® 

Omen's Park v Clyde (2 JO—— 

DiADORA IBWUB Premier rtoMotc 

Leyton; BsMng * Hbjbbbb ™t. 


break on the greens, and that 
die controversy had not helped 
his performance. It was not 
s u r prisi ng that three southern 
Africans were in the lead, he 
said, because they had been 
bom and raised “playing on 
Kikuyu grass at 5,000ft. I 
learned to play on mud below 
sea level in the pouring rain” 

Els, who responded - with a 
birdie on the next hole, said: “I 
just wanted to get on with it I 
wasn't angry. 1 think he 
[Faldo] got a little bit tense 
about it” 

Els, 23 and contesting Sun 
City’s milium dollar first prize 
for the first time, praised 
Faldo for his professionalism. 
“It was very mce playing with 
Nidc,” Els said. “He just came 
out straight with it We had a 
nice battle, out there today." 

Bernhard lancer, of Ger- 
many, the defending champi- 
on who set a tournament 
record total of 272 last year, 
went round in 69, three under 
par, despite a double bogey on 
the 8 th when an advertising 
sign deflected his drive into 
tiie rough. “1 played quite well 
but I got a vety bad break on 
the 8th,” Langer said. “If that 
sign hadn't bom there, which 
it shouldn't haw. the ball 
would have been on the fair- 
way. The sign was in the 
landing zone." 

All the leading players ex- 
cept Faldo recorded better 
rounds yesterday titan they 
had on Thursday, when gust- 
ing winds played havoc with 
dub selection, although Ian 
Woosnam remains nine shots 
off the lead. 

Price, who registered five 
birdies in his 6 7, the best score 
of the day. said he had 
overcome his nerves. “Today I 
just felt a lot more comfortable 
and just let my dubs do the 
talking." Price said. 


LEADING SECONDflOUND SCORES: 
138: N Price (Zkn). 72, 67; D Frott (SA), 70, 
88; E Eli (SAJ. 70, SB .141: J Cook (US). 73. 
68; N Fakto (08), 69. 72. 142: B Uraw 
(Gat). 73. 89. 144: F Couples (USL 74, 70. 
145: J M 0<az£M (Sp). 72, 73. 148: I 
Woosnam (G8), 75. 73. 148: C Parry (Aua), 
74,75. 


BOericay Town v Croydon; Bishop's 
Station v (Abridge; Boratam Wood v 
Maktanhoxt CteKrt Si Peter v Ooridng: 
Lewes v Wtton and Heraham: Moiesey v 
Purfeet Tooteg and Mitcham v 
Wtytatoate; Wembley v Hfchin. Second 
#&orv Bwtdaed Alhtotk: v Lorthohead; 
Barton v Neubuy: BerMmalad v Meno- 
poten Pofco. Eoham v Wttham: 
rtsigwfard v HamsHampsand; Msiden 
Vale v Edcpnare; RaWnm v ware: RuisSp 
Manor v Chaisey; Saffron Waldan 


HanGetd; Soulhal v Ttasy. TTM dMsion: 
ranmbuy; Oapion 


Bracknel v Wnmbuy; C^son v Trhg; 
Cove v Ttome: refitam and Hounslow v 
Epsom and Ewafl; Radowl Haaih v 
Camberiay; Homchuch v Aldershot Towrc 
Horsham v PeMsteld: Leighton v Hertford; 
Nortwraod v Eaffl Thurrock. 

HffS LOANS LEAGLE: Premier dMskxc 

Barrow v Frlddoy. Bishop Aucttand v 

Droyisden; Chorley v Lack; GrirMbcrough v 

Cotoyn Bey; Goote v HoiWch; Hyda v 
Emtey. Mcrecamtie v Maflodc Morafey v 
Buxton; VWttey Bay v RaatMOOCL Rrst 

dvtskxr Conototan v CU2X» AaKOTK 

Nalherfleldv Eastwood Town. FfestdMskBi 
CXp: Aston United v Roesendaie; 
B ti d Y igton Town v ABreton; Caemarfon v 
Fareley Cefec; GuBeley w Waninalan; 
Lancaster v Krwretey; WorWngtat v Hano- 
gsta; Wortaop v RadcHfa Borough. 
BEAZER HOMES LEAGUE Planter «- 

vision: BaaHw v Gkwoastar Baton v 

WaJarioowSa: DorcheaffirvOorOy; Domtv 
M oor Green; HscXwaJcrd vQarrtiidgeCiJy; 
Soflhul v Weymouth; TrowWdga v 
Atheratone; Worcester v Ct&tey Tom. 
MkOand dMAxc Bfeton vBari; Bridgnorth 
V HkioMSK Dudsy v Rushdan and O- 
amonds; Fdrast Green v RC Vtowlck; 

Grantham v Tamworth: Leicester United v 

Badworth; Newport AFC v King's iMn; 

Fteddteh v Nuneaton Boroutr; Stoutxxjge 
v Evesham; StAion CclSold v Ytae. 

Wastavsuper-Maie v Grestey. Sooftem 

division: BsWock v Hevsrc BmHrae v 

smvtxumo: Bdcftegham v Osrtertxsy 

aty; Buy Town V Newport UW; Dunslsbisv 

Parehem; Fisher Athletic v Waddsto nr. 

Subuy Town v MargMa; Wkney v 

QsvBsand and NartMeeL 
SMFMOFF IRISH LEAGUE: Beflvmenev 
BaBydare; Bangor v Gfantoran: Canlcfc v 


CcJcrano, CBtomBe v PortedOMi (1 2B)\ 

rLame; 


CWatery v Omagh Town; Gfenmon v I 

LHWd v AnteNewry v Cnsadars. 
KDfflCA LEAGUE OF WALES: Aber- 
gavenny v B*w Vela; Aten Lrio v 
Aberystwyth; Bengor v FW Town: Casrews 
v Conwy, Cwmbran v Maesug Parte Mar 
OardHf v Hawertordwest EJd); LtewB v 

Bton fmr. LtonkftM* v Cormaftfc Quay: 
Newtown v Mold. Postponed: Hoiywtfl v 
Ponhmadog. 

ALiBRKSHT BITTER WEL8H CUP: Fouth 
round: Cterai v driff (« Wan Patk). 
ABACUS WELSH LEAGUE F=ha AMorc 
Aberaman vTcn Pentra; Mdgend v 
Btaenhondda,' Oaldtoot vCaarieonrCardff 

CM ServioB v Ammaterd; Psmdafaj » 

M ui r s torr . Portypridd-Uwlwl v Pem- 

broke: Port Talbot v Brecon 
BASS NORTH WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE Rrai tflvWon: Attatm W v 
Banter Bridge; Blackpool Mechanics v 
Safari Cty Bradford Pa ik Anns v 
Caheroe; Cwwen v Chaddenon; Ftoi» 
Btackpool Rovers Kitfaflrote Attfiehc v SI 
Helens; Maine Rond v Eastwood Harisy; 
NawcasteTorwivBacupBorCutfxPtwcol 
v Buscouglr. Steimeradafe v Nartftfch. 
GREAT MUS LEAGUE Planter dhUn 
Srsstol Manor Rnt i v ^BUatont 
Qippertten v Westtwy. Dawfch v Tcr- 
Quay Unfax Bsnoutfi vltartnu Frame v 
Oamdon; Mengootek) V Chard; Taurten* 
Pariton; Tomnoai vPlymoriti Argyte. 
JEWSON EASTERN COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Planter dMten Brartham 
AMetic v Wattar Britfttigsea v MenJj 
Town Great Yrimcrih v Tlptree; Haranch 
and PateGten v F a terian. Hakm v 
IfaMaad. iBBflun C«k PrelmtatryaMid 
laptays Cantedge Oty v Wroxhanx 
Comaid v kswkhwandarara: HnwsriBv 
Soham Town fangos: Loerastofi y 
FafeotowK NeMoartcBt v Sudbuy Town; 
Siownwkat v Chatteris. 

NORTTBIN COUNTIES EAST LEAGU& 

Prariter iMrion: Belper y psaatt Town; 

BttaflvWMemn Rangers; GMsaho utften 

WaTvOmaby; Lwatwrig* v Spanryipor 
Mebby MWvPWtefaa Cel; North Ferity v 

Plctaritt Ossmi Afetan v Ai mthpr pe 

Wettare; Sheffield v Eocteha; UbcMw w 

SMCkfaWga PS. G and W Entteeerfog 

Cup: Un3i Unted v KanogaiB RA. 
NORUSVi LEAGUE: FbM jfiMoK 

BSngham Synthonta y Hytt Spartans; 

Chetof-te-StraM » Bwwcn; CBnsar w 
West Auckland; Ewlnapn CoStery 
ton; Murttirt V Fenya AWflflo: PBUriae 




GuriacrtitfiC Tow Law v I 

North a»« ton- 
SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGU & Ffart 
dMriOK Cambridge Unted v WaBord, 


.Hit IAN HERBERT 



By the book: Rosemary DunhiD with the Hambledon’s chib’s valued minute records from the late 1700s outside the Bat and Ball Inn yesterday 


Cricket chronicle paints a vivid picture 


LORD’S was not always the 
Mecca. For a good 30 years, 
cricket grew to man’s estate 
on Broadbalfpenny Down, a 
ground in Hampshire so 
remote that to find it in the 
eighteenth century was an 
adventure in itself. Such is 
the history of the Hambled on 
dob that the Department of 
National Heritage holds its 
minute book in the same 
esteem as it does works by 
Reynolds and Van Dyck. 

Cricket, after all. is art: its 
memorabilia of increasing 
value. This year the govern- 
ment has accepted several 
items in lien of inheritance 
tax, the Reynolds, the Van 
Dyck and the minute book 
among them. No matter that 
more light is thrown on the 
consumption of Hamble- 
don’s subscribers than on the 
feats of their greatest players: 
the Secretary of State 
deemed it worth his while to 
seek out the old ground 


Ivo Tennant turns the pages on the game's 


early days at Broadhalfpenny Down, when 


disputes were resolved with a dozen claret 


yesterday morning, when he 
presented the book to Hamp- 
shire’s county archivist 

Peter Brooke, coinciden- 
tally, belongs not to 
Hambledon but to MCC, 
their greatest rivals in an age 
when the niceties of the game 
were nonetheless para- 
mount He handed over the 
book to Rosemary Dunhill at 
the Bat and Ball inn, which 
acted as clubhouse in the 
time of Richard Nyren’s 
“provokingty deceitful bowl- 
ing”. Hambledon’s meetings 
were convivial affairs. A terse 
minute teOs of “a wet day. 
only three members present, 
nine bottles of wine”. 

As the years went by, 
attendances diminishe d stfll 


further. The last sad minute, 
in 1796, states simply: “No 
gentlemen." HamUedon was 
becoming edipsed fay MCC 
founded in 1787. Evidently, 
there was a case then for 
neutral umpiring for the 
book records objections fay 
members of MCC to a 
Hambledon umpire’s state- 
ment “I really think the ball 
hit the ground, but I cannot 
be positive," was bis 
judgment. 

There was some derision- 
malting. In 1773. a “mach- 
ine” was pr n rh a $pd from 
subscription money “to con- 
vey the cricketers to distant 
puts”. Regulations were 
made about the pitching of 
wickets and players arriving 


late were to be fined. In 
1774, it was ordered that a 
cricketer malting 30 runs 
should give up his bat for tiie 
innings. In 1781. hats were 
provided for the players, who 
were showing others the way 
in the improvement and vari- 
ety of their bowling. Length, 
swerve and break aO had to 
be countered. 

Fines were exacted in Itind. 
In 1 774, members who con- 
tinued a dispute after being 
asked to waive the subject by 
the president had to forfeit 
“one dozen of daret” to the 
dub. In 1782. Mr Jervoise 
was fined a buck for failing to 
observe the custom, as presi- 
dent of providing venison. 
There was much emphasis on 
food, and particularly on 
drinking. 

It was, though, owing to 
frailties on the field that the 
dub was nearly disbanded in 
the late 1760s. A one-run 
victory over Surrey in 1771 


proved the turning point and 
from then, until Ham- 
bledon’s closure in 1796, 
Hambledon played All Eng- 
land 39 times, vanning 23 of 
these matches. There was a 
notable victory at Scvenoaks 
in June 1777. when they won 
fay an innings and 1 68 runs. 

The value of the bo ok is 
enhanced by there being few 
other records of Ham- 
bledon’s early years, especial- 
ly since BroadhaHjpenxiy 
Down is often described as 
the birthplace of the game. 

A sum of £39.120 was 
accepted in lieu of tax on the 
estates of Sir Alan Lubbock, a 
former chairman of Hamp- 
shire County Council, and bis 
wife. The book will now be on 
permanent display at the 
county's record office in Win- 
chester. “It has never left 
Hampshire and this is its 
natural resting place,” the 
archivist said. “Certainly not 
Lord’s.” 


CrwiUon v Souihenct Chelsea v Pons- 
moutx LMon Onert v Mtetek OPR v 


jpBMCtr, Tottenham v GatgiOTv 1 


Ham v AraanaL Second tAristair Cct- 
eftestar v Oxford United; Crystal Palace v 
Bristol Rovers: LuJonvBntftton; Southamp- 
ton v Resting; Swindon v Bristol CSty. 
League Cup: DM round: Norwich « 
WferbedonTFiteem v Brentford. 

AFA SS80R CUP: Ftet round: Wtea 
Green v Old Wfeortane; MB W VBage v 
Old HIBnian; ErtfeW v CM Sendee; Leyton 
County OBvOdAlc*«ena; Old Pastaxwms 
v Old feJawcCwis; Tonsiey v Old 
SouttaSans; Old Manoriam v Southgate 
Comfy. 

LONDON OLD BOYS: Senior Cup: CM 
Denes v Latvmer 06; Old Meedoruane v 
Old CWgseftans; Old Aldarhamte* v Old 
Heraptoolan s ; Old Mhchendet te n s v Old 


OLD BOVS LEAGUE: Premier cti te on : 
Cheneey v Cardinal Manning: Giyn v Old 


SOUTHERN AMATEUR LEAGUE: Noras- 
man v South Bank Poly; Mfcfend Bank v 
NeMtast Bank; Kew AssodationvAlacen- 
dra Parte PoVtirohnfc v Bte; Old SeJedans v 
Barclays Bank; Uoyds Bank v Souftgaia 
Olympic; Afcyn OB v Merton; Old 
P a interiens v Rebate Priory; Cisco v 
Brenthanr Howl Bank Scodand v Old 
Lymans East Band OG v Old West- 
minster Cis; Old Laipnerians v Bank c t 
England. 

SOUTHERN OLYMPIAN LEAGUE: Bret 
division: Mil HE VCage v Nottthoraugh: 
Ok) Rndteta* v Oto FabtopimB, 
ARTHURIAN LEAGUE: Pranter dMNorr 
OU Carthusians v Old Etonians; Old 
Repronens v Lancing 06; Old 

Wefingtxalana v Old Mawentens. Brat 
dMsion: Old Brentwoode v OU 

Old Henovians v Old 

Old Salopians v Old 


to pitch 


• A! matches subject 
Inspection. 

RUGBY UNION 

230 irtecs steed 

ADT divisional champtonship 
London v Midlands 

(al Wasps FC) 

North v South West 

(at Leeds RFC, 2.0) 

ADT county championship 
First division north 
Cumbria vYcrtsWre 

(at Kendal RFC. 2X9 

Lancashire v NorttuirTfoenand 

(alFykfeRFC, 2.0} 


SECOND DIVISION: North Intends v 
Diaham (a Duttey+3ngpwinIord RFC); 
WtavifclteWB v Leiceaershlre (at Ruofay 
RFC, 30). Third dMrto n: Ch eshre v fiw 


Mkfatos (at Mftnakw ^g^Notts. Uncs 


md Darby v Staffordshire (at Neu«lc RFC, 

21^. 

First division south 
Cornwall v Middlesex 

(al Redruth RFC. 2.15) 

Hampshire vSurey 

(at US Portsmouth RFC, 2.15) 

SECOND DIVtSJON: Dewon v GtoucBSte- 
arire (at B w i Bt able RFC). TNrd dMston: 
Donat and WDtstire v BudoighemaHro (at 
Bounamoutii RFC. 2.15); Sussex v Berk- 
shire (at Wtofltiing RFC. 2.15). Fourth 
tMelon: CKtontotvey Eastern Courttes (« 
Henley RFC). 


McEwan’s Scottish 

intBr-cflstrict championship 
Glasgow v North and Midtends 
fat Hilhead JordanhB RFC, 2.0) 
South v Scottish Boles 

(al Hawick RFC, 2JS) 

UNDBV31 DISTRICT CHAMPfONSW: 

Glasgow w North and Mdands (si 

BurSas, 11 jO). Under-18: South v North 

and Mtfands Cat Kafao); Gtasgwr v 

Edhburgh (to Bianopbrigga). 

McEWATTS SCOTTISH LEAGUE: Third 
dMakifi: Langholm v CoretorpWne. 

Irish Intor-provtodal 
chfflhptonshp 
LeinBtBrv Muntoar 

(at Donnybroofo — 

Ulster v Connacht 

(at Belfast) 

Hesneken Welsh League 
Fust division 

Aberavon v Pontyr»ldd 

Cardfflv Swansea. 


Uaneffi v Neath 

Maesteg v Bndgend 

Newhrt^e v NaNpoit P 

South Wales FoBce v Pontypool 

Second division 

Btaina v Cross Keys 

Dunvantv Tenby C/td 

Uanharan v Llandovery . 


Narberth v Glamorgan Wanderas .... 

Penanh v Abertfflery 

Tredegar vEttow Vale 

THIRD DIVISION: AbercynonvOackwoocfa 
Bonymaen v Abarawon Oidns: Portypool 
United v Mowteta Ash. Postpo ne d : 


Riamay v Kanfig Ht Turrtte v Si Ptoets; 
Wrexham v Treorchy. 

Club matches 

Aspatriav Walsall — 

Blackheath v Stoubridge pH) — C 
Borouohmuir v Glasgow HighJ2.0) ... 

Broughton Park vMoriey (2.15) 

CUftonv Bristol (3.0) — 

Coventry v Wanderers (3U) 

Currie vAyrg.(J) 

Dundee h«FP v Wigtownshire (2.0) .. 

Durham v Settork (2.15) ....... 

Gala v Kelso (2.Q) — 

Glasgow Acadsv Melrose (2.0) 

Gloucester v Leicester (3.0) 

Kilmarnock v Hertote FP (2X>) 

Uverpool St Helens v Ondl 

London Irish v Met Pofca (3D) 

London Welsh v Waaps (2.15) 

Northam p ton v Bedford (3.0) 

Nottingham v Bath (3D) 

Nuneaton v Rugby (3.0) 

Ftosslyn Park v Motley (3.0) — 

Sale v Kendal (3.0) — 

Saracens v Earner (2.15) 

Sheffield v Richmond (3.0) 

Southend vAskeans 

Stewarts Mel FP v Baflymens 

WStefield v Ottey 

Watsonlarrs v Ecflnburgh Acads (2.0) 
Wtest Hartlepool v Preston 

&asBhoppers 

PROVINCIAL INSURANCE CUP: Fhreth 
nwnd: London and South But: HeSngKr v 
Seeford MkSande MaNem v M Skat 
BosMxth. North: Phoarto Parts v Brttah 
Steet South and South West Uttanorev 
North Pethertoa 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
REGALTROPHy: Second round: Wtortog- 
ton v Bmdtad (Sil). 

NATKMALAJMTEUR CHALLENGE CUP: 
Hret round: Lairth MW v Wakwy Centrat 
Demtury v Leigh East; Mom v 
Mottgraen; Bantw Isfend v ItettoH; West 
HuBvMtom; Bevarieyv Lock Lane; Ototon 
vDudteyHB;GreettaxJARvMayfi8kL 

HOCKEY 

PIZZA EXPRESS NATIONAL LEAGUE: 
Brat sMrtorc Bromley v Cannock 
(Edenhridga. 130); Caraerbuy v Rre- 
brandsfPotoFam. 12.0); East instead v 
Hwant (St H3L 215); HounslowvSt Atoms 
School, Zil): Slough v Srourpon 
School itf); Surtxton v OU 
ans {Sugdan Rob d, iJQ); 
TeddlnglEn v Boumv9a (Tt 
School. 1.0); Troters v Nestor C 
Um, Easfleigh, 1 JO); Weton v 


FOOTBALL 


FACX^ 

Second round 

Btohv Northampton (3D) 

Bradford v Huddersfield 

(a8 ticket 12.0) 

Ha rttepod v Souttoort fiO) 
Wywrrtoe v West Bromwich 

<aS ticket, 1.30) 

Premier League 
Manchester United v 
Manchester Oty (aB ticket, 4.0) — 

SMndonv Derby (255) 

Tennents Scottish Cup 
First round 

Cove Rangers v Patethsad.— 

BORO GAS LEAGUE OF HSANtt 
Prenter cMtoorr Cork Cay v Watetad 
(Zia UnBrickvStrtiounB (21 5); Sham- 
rock Rowrev Deny City (2D): Sfigo Ftass 
V Bray WMacere (2.1^. 

BEAZB1 HOMES LEAGUE: Southern 
dhWorc PDob v Ereh and Btomdere 
WOtere FA: ffat tortBton nortc Wfcn 
Kajnte v Nottwhsm fiqtfa- nxt&hion 
■note StoMeon vHasa>8reBeacnn. wffA 
Qtoc Starean Rangers v Sheffield Wad. 
Cowgto KhMb V WMtedon; Wohror- 
hampron v RS Southampton; Hooham y 
Epaora and Ewee; Luton Town v Ipswich 
Tom Mtodtebrtuto v Ttuo Cdy. Law 
tetePactfcw Bristol BeckwuS; AbWytWe 
4*rerfuch v MBwal lionasae*; Ratewnh 
* OxfanlUrttet finrften v Atonto; Tw« 
end Cou^vOeast line: Doncaster Bases 
v Knmaley Urwet St Helens v TNT; 

teeni^BtvautoivLeyton Orient; Sutodon 

Sptfna v hkkM 0 r». witert v ^oite. 


RUGBY UNION 

ADT COUNTY CHAMTONSHP: Second 
tMsion south: Hertfordshire v Kent (at Old 
Merchant Tabors’ RFC, il5). UndenCl 
charnpionsr^x EaetBm Courtte v Stroy 
(to Souffwnd, 216); Hampstea v The Army 
(al Hniam, 115); Hat to r S era v Wddtoaax 
te Bacarians RFC, Stevenage, li^; 
Susan v Kant (to Worfaig, liqT 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

HBGAL TROPHY; Second rtxjnct 
Casutootd v CarfislB 030); Fstoherefane v 
St Helens (330); Hub v HaKn 019; Hid 
KR v Wigan (3.15): hkrsiet v Vta to wtan 
{33Q: Leigh v London Cnsadea (33); 
VVdnes vFtochdate (33). 

STONES BITTBI CHAtnONSHR ThM 
cfvteort Btadooto v Onlay (23Q: Dte»- 
buy V Bfflrow (2.15); DoncatotoV Bafay. 
BFtfTTSH COAL NATIONAL YOUTH 
LEAGUE Premier CMston: Isbe^ Catfc v 
LeWr UrteK Wtaen St Judes vWtoBrtraad: 
WaotatonvDvtebuyMaor. 


BASKETBALL 

CARLSSStG NATIONAL LEAGUE Merc 
Fite dhitoon: Oktism Celtics v tendon 
Towers; Sunderland Stonte v Bbrnkighsm 
Buies. Second dMsion: Breton Topcsts v 

Ptwmuti Raiders; Mttfioaboro Mohawks v 

Covwsry Rrns. Woman : First (Melon: 

lo&Mjtoi v Lnstoar; Mlon Kaynn Q Cbb v 

Satoten: Northampton v Cheshire; Not* 
iMan WSdetoS v Rhondda Second 
(fttoten: Brtteft Lady Tcpcas v 
Write Arrears; Doncaster Free 
Press » Sundertand tetsoa 


ICE HOCKEY 

KSNSCN NA7KW4L LEAGUE P»torter 


mi irm p u j j , Wb fptr 

Ncndch and PetatKrn&i PMea v 
Bees; Wteey warriors v 


Murrayfltod Racers, fts dnbkm; Lee 
VoSey Lions v Mfan Keynes Kings; 
Sheffield Steslere v Medwqr Bears. 


VOLLEYBALL 

ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND NATIONAL 
LEAGUE: Women: first dMsion: Dynsmo 
tendon v Britannia Music (Hackney). 

BADMINTON 

ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND NTBT 
COUNTY CHAMP10NSHP: FW dMsion 
south: Hampshire v Essex. Second db 
virion north: Nottinghamshire v Dabyshke; 
YorlateBvlancew ttB 6. Secon d dnision 
south: Devon v Buddntfwrahlre; Kent v 
Sussex 


TENNIS 

VAUXHALL INDOOR 7R0PHK Women: 
Hret IOM: AIM 1: Heston Bradtoto v 

Topepbi Dtoftoon: Puma Sundetfend v 

Terns world uddtesteougn Arse z 
Etttwon Priory v Melton Mmsray; 
Weichotn Alteon v MstchpaM BrertwL 
Area 3; Puma WBkwn v Ccmnaught CSjO: 
Welwyn Spto v Haraendea Area 4: 
Ltoanham Nontoch v Lfocoln indoor; tern 
(toed Cambridge v Boston. Area & 
Ctoeniew Brentwood v Rhwsxso CN8s«c 
Waton bidoor v Mddtosac LMvertoly. Area 
6; BBC v Carton; Eatog v Queen’s Ctob. 
Ares 7i Mtodewne Rnees v Chris Una 
WoHng; Sisrey Country Oub v Pavlon and 
Aranue tewa. Area ft Osreracourt 
Ratongim te v Gospcrr. West 

Hants Bournemouth v Mach Poire 
Southampton. 


OTHER SPORT 


MOTOR RACMGC ftltlsh taSycrass grand 
prix (Branch fiarahj. 

SNOOKBt World msuhpt^ toxnamert 
Poncaster). 

TABLE TH4MS: En^sh Junior natoral 
championships (Chetonhanj. 


(Leo Schub HS, FUL 130). Second 
ahritoon: Barford Tlgere v Doncaster (Holy- 
heed LC, Btirnng na m, 230)\ Broun v 
Qtedkxd (Ktog Afad SC, ^ytoridge. 
238); BrocWands v Indan Gtymhlwna one 
Pswllon. Sate. 2.0): Chetanstoid v bca 
(Chebner Parit 2JO); Chettartton v Watrino- 
ton (Burette SchoaL Chtotanham. 1.16): 
Harteston Magpies v Hartrome (Hartesron 
HC IX): Lyons v Beeston (Vate Farm, 
Sudbuy, 230); Old Kingstonians v Rearing 
(Lonsbury Ground, Tedtfram 2 X); Rich- 
mond v Cambridge Cay (Teddtogton 
School, 2.0). 

WOMEN'S NATIONAL LEAGUE: Cttton v 

Ipswich; Ealing v FP Sutton CotdBett; 

Exmouth v Cheanstortf: Leicester Balsam v 
Pflghtown; PUeaUc v Doncaster Stotah v 
VwnbladOft Second (fivWon: Bhieherts v 

Cohrafc Cambridge CUf v Bradford 

SMthanbenk; Harierton Magpies v Sher- 

wood: Suidartend BadansvBratoowd: Ytoe 


v Troians. East League: Anchorisns v 

Re rnd ga: Bredeyhaniv Canterbuy; St 


Allans y Saracens: Seuenoaks y Ipsafch; 

HemtoHamp- 


Wtowyn v Barkhsmsted ml 

staaa Mkflands League: Lougtooroutoi v 

Atom; Loughborough Studares v Aldraga; 

Tamworth v Hampton: Wolverhampton v 

Belper. North Laepia: Great Harwood v 

Cartels; J1 Case v Chester CO; OrmriWk 
Ford v Ltwrpool: Rotheridt v Powron; 

WakaOeld v Neecastla; Yorfc v Sprinj^atts. 

South League: dry ot Portsmouth v 
Easrcote; Eafinq v Winchester. Sunbuiy v 

Sorehamptorv Whc h now HU v Roatng: 

Woktog v Cheam; Worthing v OuikSord 
West teaguo: Bamamouth v Taurcon 

\fola; Chekerham v East Gloucester Eater 

v Si Austtofc Gloucester v Weston; Redand 

v BAC; Wlmbome v Swfodon. South Wales 

laaguK BSC v Cwtraswe; Canto ANstb w 

Swansea: Newport v Penarlh; Rorthcawtv 
Cwnbran. 

ERNST AND YOUNG NORTH PREMER 

LEAGUE: Pint Anton: Ben Rhydffing v 

Norton; HgtoOwn Northern v Alderfoy Etfoa; 

Sheffield v Durham Lhtt Watofleld v 
Tmpertey; York v Forratoy. Second A 
vision: BteckbumvRamgsrraa; Krusfont v 
Sheffield Bankers: Preston v Bowdon: 

Splngftetts v teorpool Salton; Southport v 

Wigsn; Stoddon v Hanogaia; Sunderited w 
Owy; 9watNQl v HtoBw. 

PBTOM SOUTH LEAGUE: Premier A 
vtefon A: Anchorten s v Ktoti WyoomOe; 
BtecHreeth v UtodenhBach Bournemouth v 
OU WNtoAtens; Eastcoto v OU 
Tatrtortara; Hwnprtead and Westminster 
vWonhtog; OxkxdlSSB v Uoyds Benlt; 
Ramgana v Ashford; Staines vTtose »; 
Weybrtdge Hanks v WkiUadon. Premier 
AMtonB: Cheam v BackertTem; Ctsch- 
esarvOttwa ai raon ie ny.Dtiwtativaiycrl 
Portsmouth; Fareham v Woking; Gore 
Court v Oxford Univ. Spencer v Menten 
Russets; Tixforidge Web v Purley; Wto- 
chester v tendon&iwwiiy; Vfadrtfiamv 
Old Bordeniane. Recfatate Hampshire 

and Soney: Bastogstote v Metropoftan 

Pbfice: Reel v uced; Goo? v CW 

EArardana; Hamble Old Bttjys v Barnes: 

tenfouy v Andover; Maiton v Epsom; Old 
Wakxxrtiens v Oxshotl; PsaDi v Old Mtt- 

Whtamtans: Walton v Cambertey. Kent and 

Sussrec BIOS vOld HotcorrtJ^re; Bognor 

v Tonbridge: Crtxsborough v Hama Bey. 
Gcwsand v Eadbouna; Greenwich v 

Brighton; Ho re ham v Savmoska; Lewes v 

Rochester and GOngham; Mdtend Bank v 
Md-Sussas; Thames Poly v Otd 
Becctfra ml ans. Middteses, Berkshire. 
Bucks ««J Own: Amarehsm v Aytesbuy; 
Ky of Ofad v HCC; Gsnsrds Ones v Do 
Merchant Tewys 1 ; Hav«s v Harrow: Hen- 
don v Menjw; MB W v Bacftnal; 
Southgate Adel v Morris Moroni; Sunbisy v 

NPLiWndSCrv Enfiett 
PIZZA EXPRESS LONDON LEAGUE 
Premier cBvfefon; ftomtey v Old 
LoxXtunians; Hampstead v SI Atbena; 
Amng v Old Koiretohienft Richmond v 
Southg&a’ SLrbfcn v Mmbledon; 
Teddngfon v Hnnsiow. Fite dvoionc 
Beckeraum v Cheam; IMwich v Spencer, 
GuBdioid v Pirtey; Maidenhead v 
WeybridgK Oxford Urtv vSkwgh: Tiise Hi 
vBteokhetoh. 

SUN LFE WEST LEAGUE; Prwnler 
cMtoon: Ctewadon v Harafad; Westtuy 
Banks v fast Devon. 

BVJST AND YOUNG MIDLANDS 
LEAGUE: Premier dMston: Betoer v 

Cowrtry and North Wantocishiiw derby v 

Leicester Wetetogh; Ed^reeton vOtonend 
West WMffinas Hampcon in Arden v 
Bridgnorth; Khetea v Woreeeter Norton. 

NORWKSH UNION EAST LEAGUE: Pre- 

mier dhriskn Bishop's Stoftfexd v Peter- 
bonxeb; Brotome v Btteharts; Buy St 
Ecbrenfa v Ipewich; Dareham v Ceritettge 
lAnr. Norwtoh Oty v Crostyx: Paicane v 
Lidern Stevenage v Ra dbridge and Hord; 

west Hens v Colchester; Wstech v 

WestctoL 


Saws; Derby Bucks v Leicester Rtdarc 
Gtedtaid Kings v Thames Vafey Tlgere; 
London Towere v Manchester Giarts; 
Worthing Basra v Hamel Hempstead 
Rotate. Second dMakn Sdert Stars v 
Doncaster Pantheist; ware Rebate v Lewi- 
sham Ugttning Thkd dMston: Chttam 
Fsstbraak v uvetpool Atac; GuBdfoid v 
South tendon Etefteents; Lalcesw Fafoons 
v CamtxvlEV Eagles; Sheffield Forgers v 
SedgeSeld Racers; Snnndon Series v 
Stawnage Phoansc. Woman: fttodMaton: 
Cheshire v London Jets Leicester v Mkm 
Keynes 0 Cats; tendon YMCA t Thames 
Vuey: Sheffield Hatters v Northampton. 
Second dhrWon: Carnberiey Gotten Eagle 
v Souh Tynesicte. 

ICE HOCKEY 

HateOI NATXJNAL LEAGUE: Premier 
dMsion: Btetoial Bees v Mtnayfiaid 
Reoara; Fla Flyers v Whffloy Wamorc: 
Nott i ngham Panthers v Duham Wasps. 
Fkst ffivlaian: Basfogsoke Baavera v 
BomfonJ Raiders; Mlton Kaynes Kings v 
Swindon wfidcats; Slough Jets v TeEord 
TT8«. 

NETBALL 

B4GUSH COUNTIES LEAGUE: Ftret *■ 
vision: Badfordshke v Sursy; Birmingham 
v Hertfordshire; Essex Met v Kent; Mfcfcrie- 
cax v HanxBhre North. Second dMston: 
WestYorioJilre v HumbenjUa; Notbnghem- 
8rtre v Gtoucastershira; Cheshire v East 
Esssk Mtt-HempahSa v Northampton- 
sNre. Thbd dMsfan; SoiSh Staffordshire v 
Warwickshire; Dotbysttre v Shrop a t *e. 
Sissac v Lancashire: South Yoikshire v 
East Dante. 


OTHER SPORT 


BOWLS: Manchester Unto Liberty Tro- 
phy: Group one: waiwieJahka v Not- 
irgharishyB; Yorkshire v Cunbria. Group 
two: Lancashire v Leice ste rshire; Durham v 
Northtgrtoe rte nd. Group three: Essex v 
N onhamptpnshlre; B aifouMm a v Uncoln- 
Bt*a Group four Norfok v Cambndge- 
shre: SJtok v Henlocdshiro. Group toe: 
Qtauces a rahlra v Somerset Devon v 
Wtertre. Group stc Heretanfchra v Dor- 
set; Wbrcesteratare v ComwaL Grotto 
seven: Berkshire v Hampdh te Surrey v 
Bucktoghamshire. Group eW* Uddtesex 
vKfrftXbdorffiMrevSmax 
CROSS-COUNTRY; University mffich, Ox- 
ford v Cambridge (Man, 7Mm, 3 A woman, 
3m, ZQ 

SNOOKHt World mffi ehptoy tounament 
(Doncaster). 

TABLE TONS: Engtish lunor ration 
ehampfansffipe (Chetonham). 


BASKETBALL 

CAfUBBe NATIONAL LEAGUE: Mac 
Ftret dMston: Btnrt n Qham Brerots v O » 
lam Cantos; Cheshire Jets v SundBriand 



RACING 


CaU 0891 500 123 

Results 

Call 0891 100 123 


FOOTBALL 


Reports and sans from 
the FA Premier League 

Call 0839 555 562 


Rants and scores from 
tiie r A Cup, second round 

xmlSBini^i TiiHpin 

Can 0839 555 512 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Ropftts sod scores from the 
Stones Biner Championship 

CaU 0839 555 525 


Calls at 36p per mm cheap rate, 
48pper mm other times ineYAT 


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i* 


T i 


28 SPORT/RACING 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 - 


Court of Appeal rejects Aga Khan’s move 





Aga Khan: appeal unlikely 


By Richard Evans 
RACING CORRESPONDENT 

THE Court of Appeal yesterday 
rejected the Aga Khan’s latest 
attempt to challenge the Jockey 
Club's disqualification of his 19S9 
Oaks winner. Aliysa. 

In a unanimous decision, the 
judges decided that the ruling by 
racing's governing body was not 
open to judicial review because 
such an appeal procedure was 
confined to public law decisions of 
governmental bodies and 
tribunals. 

Sir Thomas Bingham, Master 
of the Rolls, readily accepted that 
the Jockey Chib regulated a signifi- 
cant national activity ana al- 
though its powers could be 


described, as public, “they are in no 
sense governmental". 

“It would be contrary to sound 
and longstanding principle to 
extend the remedy of judicial 
review to such a case," he 
conduded. 

The Jockey Club said the judg- 
ment dearly established the reme- 
dy for anybody participating in 
horse racing ana aggrieved a I 
something the Jockey Club may 
have done was to sue in the 
ordinary way. 

“Judidal review is a remedy 
against government,' 1 a statement 
said. “The Jockey Chib has never 
considered that it is doing the 
work of government in adminis- 
tering racing. AO sportingauthori- 
des in this country will surely 


welcome the fact that any remain- 
ing doubt in this matter has now 
ban resolved." 

The verdict is likely to bring to 
an end the long-running legal 
battle between one of the world’s 
richest men and die Jockey Club, 
and win. it is hoped, paws the way 
for behind-the-scenes discussions 
which will enable the Aga to fed 
he can race again in Britain. 

In theory, the Aga can seek leave 
to appeal to the House of Lords, 
but last night that appealed un- 
likely. Matthew McQpy, the Aga’s 
solicitor, said after yesterday's 
hearing: “The Court of Appeal 
indicated, in my view, it is unlikely 
leave would be granted. 

“It might be tne end of die road 
as far as courts are concerned. 


That is a matter for His Highness- 
But it certainly is not the end of the 
road as far as resolving deficien- 
cies in file drug-testing system and 
related disciplinary procedures. 
Those are matters that have to be 
addressed." 

Aliysa was disqualified after 
3 -Hydroxycamphor (3-HQ was 
found in a post-race urine sample. 
The Jockey Club* disciplinary 
committee concluded, on the basis 
of work by the Horseraring Foren- 
sic Laboratory at Newmarket, the 
3-HC came from camphor, a 
banned substance. The decision 
was made despite scientists hired 
by the Aga proving for the first 
time that 3-HC could come from 
bomeol. which is found in feed- 
stuff's and bedding. 


The Aga removed his 90-strong 
string in December 1990 in 
protest at what he saw as deficien- 
cies in Britain's drug-testing proce- 
dures. Nothing has been done to 
address his concerns, shared by 
other significant foreign owners. 
After a spate of “camphor 
positives" there have been none of 
late; which, to put it mildly, 
appears strange. 

Yesterday’s ruling wiD come as a 
welcome relief to the Jockey Club, 
but die probable conduskm of the 
legal machinations should not be 
allowed to distract from tbe central 
problem which remains. 

What would happen, for exam- 
ple, if one of Shaikh Mohammed's 
h orses was found to be camphor 
positive after a random test, the 


validity of which has already been 
raiipri into serious question? The 
likelihood is that his maroon and 
white silks would not been seen in 
Britain again. 

□ Geoff Hubbard has withdrawn 
his legal action against the Jockey 
Club after the disqualification of 
hones ridden by Adrian Maguire 
in January, Mien he wrongly 
claimed a conditional jockey's 
allowance. The Suffolk owner lost 
four winners, including three at 
the Sandown meeting of January 
3. Nowell Waddm, Hubbard's 
solicitor, last night that new 
procedures made the possibility of 
other conditional jockeys being 
caught out extremely smalL 

Sport and the law. page 5 


England wing’s prior commitment opens door for rivals 

Tony Underwood may rue 
absence from North game 


By David Hands, rugby correspondent 


THE trail that begins today at 
Sudbury and Kirkstall winds 
by the ADT divisional champ- 
ionship. through the five na- 
tions' championship and busy 
B programme next year, into 
the England tour to North 
America in May. 

It is the same in Scotland 
and Ireland, where the district 
and provincial championships 
continue. In Ireland, Con- 
nacht hope to build on that 
remarkable 28-9 victory over 
Leinster last weekend. 

The two countries meet in 
an A international three days 
after Christmas and, like Eng- 
land. undertake development 
tours in the summer. 

Whether the developing 
players will receive caps 
against the United States and 
Canada is undecided, but die 
possibility will act as an incen- 
tive today. 

Some will be happy just to 
play, including Rob Andrew, 
who will captain London 
against the Midlands on his 
home ground at Wasps. It still 
rankles with Andrew. En- 
gland's stand-off half in 50 
internationals, that eligibility 
regulations prevent him re- 
suming his competitive dub 
career until February. Whar, 
he asks, would have been his 


prospects of touring New Zea- 
land with the British Isles next 
summer had his business 
move from France to England 
been in the new year? 

He admits, though, that a 
break, now after ending the 
1991-2 season in France in 
June and resuming in August 
is not unwelcome. Moreover, 
he is a wholehearted supporter 
of the divisional champion- 
ship. “The slightly alien envi- 
ronment is what it's about for 
players." Andrew said. “It 


brings them into a situation 
similar to international rugby, 
with limited time to prepare 
and a requirement to adapt to 
different team members and 
playing divisions." 

With the exception of the 
divisional champions, die 
Midlands, today's teams have 
slight modifications because of 
injuries. One notable absen- 
tee, Tony Underwood, needs 
every opportunity to ensure his 
England wing spot against the 
competition offered by his 


DlVISlONALTEAlS 



London v MkSands (at Wasps, 220) 
LONDON. A Buzza (Wasps); S Piriin 
(Wasps). F Ctaurtv (Wasps). J BuCMOn 
(Saracens). D O'Leary (Saracend; R 
Andrew (Wsspc. capian), S Bates 
). J Leonard (Hartequmfl), B Moore 

}. J Protoyn (Waspsl. M Skinner 

4. M Russel (HoiiequKd. R 
(Harlequins). J Casssl (Sara- 

cens), D Ryan (Wasps) Rapteesmerts: M 
Evans (Hartequtnn), G Gregory (Notting- 
ham), R Ghsntster (Hartequms), G Holmes 
(Wasps). G Bottemtan (Saracens), S Dam 
(Harieouins). 

MIDLANDS J Utey (Lacaster): S Hackney 
(Leicester). S Potter (Lecester), F Pack- 
man (Northam pt on). H Thomeyooft 
(Northampton). J Steele (Northampton). A 
Kadoanl (Lenester). M Unn ad (Moseley), 

J Otwer (Northampton). D Gaitortfi 
(Lacestar). P ShHngfbm (Mgsoiey), M 
Johnson (Lateeeterl. M Bayfield (North- 
ampton). N Back (Leicester). 0 Rtcharcte 
(Leicester, captain] Replacements R 
Angel (Coventry}. U Dawson (Northamp- 
ton). G Rountree (Lemester). fj I Coctardl 
(Leicester), S Uoyd (Mowwyj, R Tebbutt 

(Northampton!. 

Referee- S Ptensy (YorKstvre). 


North v South-West (at Leeds, 2.0) 

NORTH. I Hunter (ftothampton): N 
Heatap (Orel), B Briny (Wakefield). K 
Simms (Liverpool St Helms, captain), R 

Underwood (UHcocitXl: P Grayson (Water- 
loo). D Morris (Orrefl), M Hynes (Onell). S 
Mtahefl (West Hartlepool). M Whitcomb® 
(Sale). P Walton (Northampton), T Rodbor 
(Northampton). W Dootay (Preston Grass- 
.loppers), M Pepper jNottinghaml. M 
Greenwood (Wasps). RepJseementK J 
Motandw (Sate). M Jackson (Fykfe), D 
ScuBy (WahefeU), P Lancaster (West 
Hartlepool). P Hacked (Waterloo), K 
Wastgartli (West HarOepooQ. 

SOUTH-WEST. J Webb (Bath): N Beal 
(Northampton). P da GtarndM (Bath), J 
Guscott (Bath), S Morris (Gloucester): S 
Barnes (Bath, captain). R HI (Bath): C 
Clark (Swansea). K Dunn (Wasps), J 
Malkm (Barn), j Hafi (Bath). N Redman 
(Bath), A Bteckmore (Emtot). A Robinson 
(Bath). B Clarke (Bath). Replacements: P 
Mud (Bristol). N Matthews (Gloucester), M 
Olsen i Llandovery) M Regan iBranx). G - 
Dam (Bathj. S Ojoffloh (Batm. 

Rotor ee. J Bndgalupo (Soattand) 


Risks involved in allocating 
World Cup to South Africa 


T he announcement by 
President F, W. De 
Klerk that South Afri- 
ca's first one-petson-onewote 
election should take place in 
1994. after an interim gov- 
ernment in 1993, will have 
aroused hope where once 
was despair. But on a lower 
plane of debate — since it's 
only sport we're talking 
about — it will not have been 
received, one assumes, with 
great whoops of joy among 
the members of the Interna- 
tional Rugby Football Board. 

The date is fixed exactly a 
year before their World Cup 
tournament is due to begin 
in the Republic and this fixed 
date should concentrate 
minds in a way an open 
agenda would not. 

Whoever takes over the 
reins of government must 
thereafter confront a disaf- 
fected and volatile opposi- 
tion. Order is hard to restore 
and so fragile and difficult to 
ma inrain 

A delegation from Rugby 
World Cup (KWQ will visit 
South Africa in the new year 
and will conduct a series of 
meetings, to canvas opinion 
and to see whether the South 
African Rugby Football 
Union (SARFU) can dis- 
charge its obligations. 

When the RWC delegates 
return, they will submit a 
report to die IRFB outlining 
whether the operation re- 
mains feasible. Is South Afri- 
ca capable or not of holding 
what is emerging as one of 
sport's most prestigious 
events? Are the mechanics of 
the operation in place? 

The RWC will consider 
whether the infrastructure 



Gerald 

Davies 

Rugby Commentary 


exists to support an event of 
this scale. Of no small con- 
sideration, for instance, is 
that there is no coordinated 
public transport system 
within South Africa. Moving 
from one province to another 
is mostly done by air. 

This is as it during the 
1991 World Cup, travelling 
between Cardiff. Edinburgh 
and Loudon could have been 
achieved only by aircraft. An 
influx of 1 5,000 visitors had 
to be catered for last year. 
Due to the South Africa's 
obvious tourist attractions, 
as much as the developing 
interest in the tournament 
itself, this figure wifi be 
surpassed in three years’ 
time. 

S hifting these numbers 
around swiftly with 
maximum conve- 
nience without an alterna- 
tive means of mass 
conveyance is an outstand- 
ing obstacle to overcome. 
Such practical issues will be 
lmown by the spring. 

The philosophising will fol- 
low. Bearing in mind the 
present social precarious- 
ness — some All Blacks were 
mugged by a gang armed 
with machetes last summer 
— and the future political 
uncertainty, the way forward 
becomes more indetermi- 
nate and unforeseeable. 

Tbe first World Cup in 
1987 was organised in 22 


months. The competition is 
now larger, with a commen- 
surate ly larger organ- 
isational requirement The 
World Cup tournament as a 
sporting event could be 
moved to another country at 
relatively short notice. But 
the hard negotiating of com- 
mercial contracts take a 
good deal longer. 

The allocation of the 
World Cup to South Africa, 
therefore, looks increasingly 
like an idea which was good 
at tbe time. But as 1995 
telescopes into view, the path 
is fraught with difficulties, 
the largest conundrum of ail 
being South Africa’s condi- 
tion after the elections. 

Therefore, if the IRFB 
continues to stand by its 
original decision, it could be 
embarking on a strategy of 
the highest risk. There are no 
guarantees. By the time it 
knows the election result in 
1994 , and if this proves 
adverse, it will be too late to 
change. The opposition to 
the venue by the Welsh 
Rugby Union, a body not 
best known for the sagacity 
with which it has conducted 
its recent affairs, now app- 
ears infinitely wise. 

Members of the IRFB will 
be sadder men for not going 
to South Africa. But they 
may be wiser men who can 
be expected to sleep o’nights. 
Their nerve is about to be 
tested. 


1 

1 

_ MATCH-BY -MATCH- GUIDE 



Heineken League 
First division 

Aberavon v Pontypridd 

AOeravtYi tad BuckraU, usuafy a mu 
back, ai cenire aftei a stony ol injures and 
leCkve Mite Griffiths lo prop 
Fcytypofla play Picks at No. 3, D ecausa 
Mttoiosh e required by Scottefi 
Exiles, and gne Cody ns tad league 
game erf the season on me wing. 

Cardiff v Swansea 

Caiditt wefcome back Raver (lull 
back) and Ring (centre) terihw topol- 
Ihc-tabte meeting and make three 
rwaons to the pack ma tielpaa beat 
Newport taa -neefc. They aspect a 
capacity crowd ol 14.000 tor the wst Ota 
Swansea side sm without Clemen. 

Sail remains at tuD back and Matcaoe at 
wop. wta!e Gfcbs and Robert Jones 
netum 

Hani-fl? v Neath 

janeft, lying fcjuflh ixtf with a game a 


hand ovar the top Dm dubs, wiD 
leapfrog Nealh if they win Moan return at 
semm ha with Boobyer at centra, but , 
Isaac e unavailable tar Nasti because of 
a knee injury BW replaces twn at 
ceres and Kemtxny comas mio the Bach 
row 

Maestes v Bridgend 

ires derby fomra was snared ona 
apece last season, but Bndgard w® hope 
to sustam the momentum ot last 
week's vwi over Newbndga Austin and 
Greensteda play lhar fiist league 
games n the frord row. Uoyd returns to 
tne back row and wwb switches to 
Dtewng 

SW Police v Ponfypool 

South Wales Poice, bottom d the 
tebto. Buttered a further blow thb week 
when Wfltefcid. their tack, was ruled 


Portypoolfcnng bach White end 
Hansen lo the wmgs but have a (kkfct at 
loose head Dtobte e recovering from 
a gran strain and David Thomas bom 



Rayer. back for Cardiff 

. k 
? 


brother, Rory, and Ian Hunt- 
er, bur business has taken him 
to the Continent 
Whether the North, who 
play the South and South 
West at Kirkstall in Leeds, 
choose him next week may 
hinge on their success today. 
They have Rory Underwood 
on the left and Nigel Heslop, 
the 1991 grand slam wing 
who hopes to regain his inter- 
national place, on the right 
The South West have two 
fine prospects at prop: Chris 
Clark, the Swansea university 
student who has made consid- 
erable advances with the 
Swansea dub, and John 
Maliett who replaces the in 
jured Victor Ubogu. With the 
addition of John Hall, pre- 
ferred to Mike Teague at 
flanker, the South West for- 
wards will make an interesting 
study for the selectors. 

So should die London pack, 
where Mark Russell and Rich- 
ard Langhom, better known 
for their back-row activities, 
have been named at lock. 

The opening rounds of the 
county championship run 
concurrently with the division- 
al championship, Lancashire 
beginning the defence of their 
title against Northumberland 
at Fylde. 

Murphy 
sizes 
up task 

By David Hands 

GIVEN the appointment of 
Gerry Murphy as coach to 
Irelands senior squad, the 
number of national coaches in 
the five nations’ champion- 
ship who were backs in then- 
own playing days bas now 
reached four. If Geoff Cooke, 
who has been such an influ- 
ence on England's develop- 
ment were included you could 
argue all five. 

Should we then anticipate 
an explosion in exciting back 
play now that Murphy, once a 
full back, joins Ian 
McGeechan of Scotland 
(stand-off half or centre), Alan 
Davies of Wales (stand-off) 
and Pierre Berbizier of France 
(scrum half}? Not really, since 
so much of good back play 
revolves around confidence 
and fine timing, qualities the 
Welsh are slowly clawing 
back, that worry the Soots and 
the French and of which 
Ireland’s team has been 
drained. 

Murphy. 47, met Irish Rug- 
by Football Union officials this 
week to discuss plans for the 
new year, a week after the 
union's executive committee 
confirmed his appointment as 
successor to Ciaran Fitzgerald, 
who resigned after Ireland's 
defeat by Australia in October. 

Fitzgerald and Murphy 
coached Ireland in New Zea- 
land last summer but Murphy 
also spent time in Australia 
studying development pro- 
grammes. “We have to 
maximise our resources," he 
said. "We feel the schools in 
Ireland do relatively well, they 
can take on anyone. But we 
don't develop the kids enough 
and there is a fair amount of 
emigration. We need a rugby 
foundation." 

Before that, though, Mur- 
phy’s aim wifi be a win. any 
kind of win, to jolt the senior 
players from depression and 
restore self-esteem. 

“We need to build a little bit 
of confidence but it will be 
difficult,’' Murphy said. 

“There were a octuple of 
good performances against 
the Australians, by Munster 
and Connacht and there have 
been some good All-Ireland 
League games, though they 
tend to be a bit negative. We 
just need to scab a win from 
somewhere — 1-0 would be 
enough." 


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Something to celebrate Aamir Sohail has just bad Richardson caught off his bowling 

Bowlers excel for Pakistan 


Perth: Pakistan made a con- 
vincing start to the World 
Series Cup triangular tourna- 
ment with a five-wicket victory 
over West Indies at the WACA 
ground here yesterday. 

However, the win achieved 
with four balls to spare and 
was douded by an injury to the 
opening batsman. Aamir 
Sohail. who strained a thigh 
musde, an injury which 
makes him doubtful for the 
three matches remaining be- 
fore the competition enters a 
month-long recess. 

Outstanding bowling from 
Waqar Younis. Wasim Akram 
and Mush taq Ahmed helped 
Pakistan restrict West Indies 
to 1 97 for nine from their 50 
overs. Brian Lara was the top 
scorer with 59. a figure 
matched byJaved Miandad, 
who was at the helm during 
the dosing stages of Pakistan's 
innings. 

Akram won the man of the 
match award, following his 
four for 46 with an unbeaten 


21 as he and Miandad 
knocked off the last 36 rims. 

Aamir's injury means that 
the Pakistanis have only 13 of 
their 15-strong squad avail- 
able for tbe next match, 
against Australia in Hobart 
on Thursday, for Aaqib Javed 
is still recovering from a stress 
fracture in his back, an injury 
which flared up in a practice 
match six days ago. 

“The doctor told me the 
thigh could be better tomor- 
row or ft could take as tong as 
14 days," Aamir said. “We 
won’t know just how bad ft is 
for a couple of days but I 
definitely think I will miss the 
next game." 

Aamir. who bowled eight 
overs during the West Indies 
innings; strained his thigh 
while attempting to run out 
Carl Hooper and had to bat 
with a runner during his brief 
stay at the crease. 

Hooper, who damaged a 
calf muscle, also had to use a 
nirmer but he was fit enough 


to bowl when Pakistan batted. 

WEST WOES 

D L Haynes c RasHd b Waqar 1 

PV Simmons c Rashid b Wasim B 

"R B Richardson c Wasim b Aart* 23 

B C Lara c sub (Nated'Anium) 

b Mushtaq 99 

C L Hooper c tozamani b Musttflq 2A 

K L T Arthurian b Rashti b Waswi - 9 

tJ Murray b Waqar 22 

I R Bishop c Rashid b Wasim 6 

CEL Ambrose na on ... 15 

A CCummnsc Javed b VlMi ..0 

KCG Benjamin not Cut 13 

Extras (b 4. to 3. w a, rto 4j 19 

Total (9 wkts. 50 ousts) 197 

FALL OF WICKETS’ 1-1, 2-12, W4, MM, 
5-138. 6-140. 7-153. 8-178. 9-177. 
BOWLING: Warm 9-1-«M (3 rib): Waqar 
7-2-28-2 It r*. 3 wj: Ate-ur-Rahrrian lOO- 
»0 (4 w): Aan* 8-0J6-1 (1 w), Mushtaq 

10-1-22-2: Mi^iabaWWi -a 

PAKISTAN 

Aamir Sohaflc Haynes bBohoo 2 

Rama Rate c Murray b Banjamo 34 

Safcn Maflt c Murray b Bemarrtn 35 

* J»«J Mkardad nen csi ss 

lraamarn*-Haq c Lam b Hooper 28 

Asf Mujuba rm our 3 

Waam Akram noi out 21 

Extras (b 4. w 3, nb IQ) 17 

Tots (5 hMs, 492 overs) 199 

tRasNd UW. Waqar Ydurw. Muahtaq 
Ahmad and Ata-ur-Rehmai did not tut. 
FALLOF WICKETS. 1-6. 2-62. 3-102 4-157. 
5-163 

BOWLING. Ambrose 92-2-30-0 (2 w), 
Bfeteto 10-1-34-1 (1 nb.lw);Cummfifi10- 
0-41-0 (4 nb). Benjamm 100-46-2 (5 nb). 
Hoopa IO-O-44-i 1 

Man ol Die mach: waam Atoan 


1)1 


J 0 




... 


CRICKET 

Ten tons 
to film 
England 

TEN tons of television equip- 
ment wifi follow the England 
team round India this winter 
when the Test series will be 
shown live in British homes 
for the first time. 

The producer. Gary 
Frances, said: “It’s the biggest 
adventure I've ever undertak- 
en. We are treading where no 
TV cricket man has gone 
before." 

With a tight schedule and 
huge distances, TransWorld 
International, which is trans- 
mitting three Tests and six 
one-day games for BSky B, has 
hired a former Indian Air 
Force cargo plane to ferry the 
hardware during their seven- 
week trip. 

Frances says: “Five tons of 
TV equipment and a five-ton 
earth station will be loaded on 
to the plane after each match 
and then taken from the . 
airports to the grounds on 
trailers." Frances claimed a . 
television first when he sent ; 
bade pictures from the Eng- 
land series in West Indies two 
years ago. 

“We only had to use the 
earth station briefly in West 
Indies, but this time we need it 
for every match,” he said. “It 
means we have to cany round 
more than 100 boxes as well 
as taking 35 crew,, the biggest 
cridset tearii ever to leave this . 
country. 

“The cost of the whole 
operation is going to be huge. . ! 
Not quite as much as die 
filming of Gandhi — but far 
bigger than the series from 
West Indies." 

David Gower, controversial- 
ly left out of the tour party, will 
be one of the commentators, 
with Geoff Boycott and SnD 
Gavaskar, the former Indian 
Test captain. 

□ Derbyshire, whose future 
was threatened by a loss of 
E7 1.000 last year, made a 
turnaround of more than 
£90,000 last summer to shbw 
a profit of £20.046. An in- 
crease of almost £50.000 in 
the TCCB's allocation, now 
more than half their total 
income, and a rise of nearly 
£40,000 in oommerda) profib 
were the main factors in 
Derbyshire’s improved 
figures. 

Bob Lark, the chief execu- 
tive, said: "The profit was less 
than we had hoped to - 
achieve." 

The accounts reveal total 
liabilities of more than £1 
million, but the county’s deli- 
cate financial situation is ex- 
pected to improve when a new 
development at the county 
ground goes ahead and they - 
receive a £200,000 windfall 
from the wil] of a local farmer. 

□ Chris Smith, the former 
Hampshire and England ^ 
batsman, has been appointed 
the chief executive of the 
Western Australian Cricket 
Association based in Perth. 
South African-born Smith, ' 
34, retired from Hampshire 
in 1991 and emigrated to ' 
Australia to become market- " 
ing manager of the WACA the 
week after helping Hampshire 
reach the semi-final of the 
Natwest Trophy, which they 
went onto win. 

Smith played in only eight 
Tests for England, but made 
more than 1 5,000 runs with 
41 centuries in 12 years with 
Hampshire. He is the brother 
of Robin Smith, the Test 
batsman. 





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Pringle strikes back for New Zealand 


Colombo: A downpour 
washed out the first one-day 
Internationa] between New 
Zealand and Sri Lanka here 
yesterday when the game was 
at an interesting stage in the 
floodlit Khettara Stadium. 

Sri Lanka, pursuing a vic- 
tory target of 167 in 50 overs, 
were 4 1 for two when the rain 
came, with Mahanama and 
de Silva Hying to repair the 
damage caused by Chris 
Pringle, who had taken both 
wickets in the space of three 
balls. He had Hathurusinghe 
caught behind by Parore. 


Gurusinha fell to a spectacular 
catch by Harris, running back 
from extra cover. 

Martin Crowe, the New 
Zealand captain, later ex- 
pressed his unwillingness to 
take his team out, because of 
ground conditions while his 
opposite number, Ranatunga. 
described the dedsion to aban- 
don the match as “very fun- 
ny”. But the umpires ruled 
that the outfield was too 
slippery to allow further play. 

Sri Lanka's bowlers, backed 
try excellent ground fielding, 
kept the batsmen under con- 


stant pressure, with Kalpage, 
the off spinner, particularly 
effective on a slow pitch. 

The New Zealand seam 
bowler, Michael Owens, who 
was smick in the face by a ball 
during a practice session, may 
miss the second Test which 
starts tomorrow, 

NEW ZEALAND 

TA C Parore am out so 

J^W^OUPWjcteemaBinQha . _ 7 

AHjonas d A G D WlckremiSrtte 

bamamha .54 

•U D Craw c A G D Wtitfemasta** 

C Z “ 

ua Ham rex ore . . 

J T C Vajgftan b Kaipape . ..“ " .. Q 

G D Bradbum b Kataev .. - G 

0 J Nash run out ' , "" § 


^ StTja tow b Gunsmha 1 

C Prtngte rex ai a 

Extras (to 8, w 13) - - gt 

Total (9 Mtts, 50 oven) 166 

FALLOF WICKETS. 1 » N7. MS, 4-W, 
5-108. 8-124, 7-136. 8-146, 9-1SS. 
BOVWJNG Uyanaoe 100-39-2: 0 P 


A'**** 50-21-0; Kaipage 10 a , 

0-20-3; Guustoha 9-1-25-2. . ' .i 

Qe . w SR] LANKA 

R S Mahanam a rot out 11 

uCHtehurustnehec Parens bPnnote-5 !**• 

APGumanftuc Harris bPmgte 0 

PAdeSh&rexoi* 13 .<->■ 

Extras (b 2. w 10) -J2 -c 

Total p«*tfs, 10.2 owns} 41 •- 

■A Ranatunga, H P TBokarreno. TA G 0 

WK^amasInghB. D Urtmage, r - — ■ 

S D Anuraon and 0 P WfeSrem 
FALL OF WICKETS 1-20. 2-20. . 

BOWLING- Pmgfe S 2-0-1M; Sira 4-0-13- 
CkNaati 14*110. 

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the times Saturday December 


5 1992 


Miinnehoma ready 
to spark another 


big double for Pip 

1 ttflVI L.J _ 


MARTIN Pipe had a profit- 
able time on the corres- 
ponding day last year when he 
won the two most valuable 
races at Chepstow and 
Sandown with Carvifl's Hill 
and Balasani respectively. 

Now the champion trainer 
looks capable of repeating the 

achievement with Mimnte- 
boma (2.05) and Valfinet 
(2.30). 

Miinnehoma. the best stay- 
f ing novice chaser last season 
r and already many people's 
idea of the likely Cheltenham 
Gold Cup winner next March, 
begins another campaign by 
contesting the Rehearsal 
Chase at Chepstow. 

He will be one of three 
runners Pipe saddles for the 
race. Bonanza Boy and Run 
For Free being the other two. 

Significantly. Peter 
Scudamore rides Mtitinc- 
homa even though he has not 
nut this season. 

Scudamore has already test- 
ed the water on his stable 
companion Run For Free 
when they beat the subsequent 
Hennessy Cognac Gold Cup 
runner-up, Jod ami, to win the 
Edward Hanmer Memorial 
Chase on his first outing at 
w Haydock last month. 



Michael Phillips 

In the Sun Alliance Chase at 
Cheltenham, Run For Free 
finished ten-and-a-half 
lengths in third place behind 
Miinnehoma at level weights. 

On only 61b better terms, he 
should not be able to acco unt 
for a fit and dearly fan cied 
Mimnehoma this afternoon. 

If he is to have any chance of 
winning the Gold Cup. 
Miinnehoma must now make 
telling use of the 201b he 
receives from Cool Ground, 
last season’s Gold Cup win- 
ner. Cool Ground was recently 
a falter at Aintree. 

Capability Brown (2.3S). 
who has won three times over 
today’s course and distance, 
and The Black Monk (3.05) 
are other likely winners for 
Pipe and Scudamore on the 
Welsh track. 

At Sandown, Valfinet is 
napped to win the William 
Hill Handicap Hurdle. 

Apart from winning it last 
year with Balasani. Martin 
Pipe also plundered die prize 
in 1 988 with Corporal Ginger 


and the following year with 
liadetL 

Jenny Pitman, who inter- 
rupted the sequence by win- 
ning die 1990 running with 
Wonder Man, now fields 
Egypt Mill Prince, who was 
also engaged in the Henry 
VIII Novices' Chase. 

I prefer Valfinet since his 
first winning run of the season 
at Cheltenham appeared to 
hold out such great hopes for 
die future. 

While he has been penalised 
41b fortodays race, the h an di- 
capper has increased his rat- 
ing to 201b for future events. 

In contrast. Easy Buck now 
meets Jopanini on 81b worse 
terms for that three-length 
deficit at Ascot a fortnight ago. 

Waterloo Boy. who won foe 
Mitsubishi Shogun Tingle 
Creek Trophy carrying list 
1 31b last year, now has only an 
additional pound to cany. 

However, in receipt of 1 01b, 
Unde Ernie will surely prove 
dangerous since he was threat- 
ening Remittance Man at 
Huntingdon recenfiy until the 
last fence proved bis downfall. 

Incidentally. Unde Ernie 
was only four lengths behind 
Waterloo Boy at Newbury last 
February at level weights. 


RACING 29 


New series draws 
the rising stars 

By Brian Bebl 


THE Tunes is launching an 
exciting £24,000 hunter 
chase series in the new 
year. 

The Times Rising Stars 
series wfl] have eight quali- 
fying races, starting at 
Towcester on February 16 
and leading up to the 
£10,000 grand final at 
Worcester on April 14. 

The series wiH give top 
point-to-pointers the 
chance to compete against 
hunter-chasers for prize- 
money considerably great- 
er than that allowed in 
point-to-points. 

In sponsoring the Rising 
Stars series. The Times 
moves to the top end of the 
hunter chase scale after 
successfully promoting its 
restricted point-to-point 
championship series for six 
years. 

The aim is to attract the 
best point-to-pointers in 
the six to eight-year-old 
range. 

At the time of starting, 
horses must be qualified to 
run in a point-to-point, a 
unique condition in hunter 
chases. 

Percy Tory, the chair man 
of the Point-to-point Own- 
era* Association. said: “This 
is a development which will 
be welcomed by all owners, 
and should ensure an en- 


TiH lli— ii IIMI 'I 



RISING 


STARS 


thusiastic response to the 
series.” 

After Towcester on Feb- 
ruary 1 6. seven other quali- 
fiers will be run: 
Sedgefield, February 23; 
Kelso, March 5; Bangor, 
March 10; Lingfield. 
March 19; Nottingham, 
March 23; Taunton, April 
1; Ludlow. April 7; with the 
final at Worcester on April 
14.. 

To ensure a good field for 
foe final, which would be 
limited to an entry of 24 if 
only placed horses were 
eligible, any horse that has 
taken part in a qualifying 
race may enter. 

Winners of these earlier 
races will be guaranteed a 
run if a ballot is necessary, 
and horses which finished 
second and third will be the 
last to be eliminated. 


Stephenson’s death casts 
giant shadow on racing 


YESTERDAY, foe racing 
world was mourning Arthur 
Stephenson, foe legendary 
National Hunt trainer from 
County Durham, who died in 
hospital on Thursday night 
after a long illness. He was 72. 

Not for nothing was this 
remarkable diameter known 
as the iron man of 
Leasingfoome. Even in a 
sport where no quarter is 
asked and none given, his 
toughness and dedication 
were a byword. He was hard 
on his jockeys, hard on his 
horses but above all. he never 
spared himself. 

Peter GreenaH managing 
director of Green all Whitley 
and chairman of Aintree race- 
course, was twice champion 
amateur jockey and had nu- 
merous successes such as The 
Boy and Timmie’s Battle, 
which were found for him and 
trained by Stephenson. 

Green all said yesterday: 
“If s foe end of an era. We had 
some great times. He was 
tough and he expected those 
around him to be foe same.” 

Chris Grant the stable jock- 
ey, whose wife. Dawn, died in 
October after a long battle 
with cancer, commented: 
“The boss always used to say to 
me how tough Dawn was. but 
there was no one tougher than 
Arthur. If you ever had any 
problems, he was always there 
to help you.” 


By Michael Seely 

A fearless point-to-point rid- 
er and amateur jockey before 
he took out his first foil 
training licence in 1959. Ste- 
phenson tasted his first big- 
race success when Kinmont 
Wullie won the 1961 Scottish 
National. 

Hewas the first man to train 
100 National Hunt winners 
in a season, saddling 114 
during the 1969-70 cam- 
paign. He went on to repeat 
foe feat six times in the next 
seven years. 

During his career he sent 
out over 3,000 winners. The 
trainer's most important suc- 
cess came when The Thinker 
won foe 1987 Cheltenham 



Stephenson: private 


Gold Cup. Typically. Stephen- 
son was dose to home at 
Hexham, where he Has super- 
vising Succeeded to wan a 
modest three-mile chase. 

He was a dynamo of restless 
energy. He made an unforget- 
table sight as he bustled round 
the racecourse, with a tweed 
cap pulled firmly down over 
the piercing eyes, foe high- 
coloured features and 
aqualine nose. 

He was somehow reminis- 
cent of an old-time border 
raider about to pounce, and 
often the bookmakers were his 
intended victims. 

An intensely private man. 
he shunned publicity. “Little 
fish are sweet” was his favour- 
ite saying when one of his 
horses had won a minor race. 

He detested being quizzed 
about his future intentions. 
“Nay, lad” he used to say. "you 
know me. no plans." 

Above all, Stephenson was a 
stockman and wheeler-dealer, 
running a 1 .000-acre farm. 

Apparently, up to within a 
few minutes of his death. 
Stephenson was still planning 
future campaigns for his 
hones. 

Stephenson’s nephew. Peter 
Cheesb rough, has been grant- 
ed a temporary training li- 
cence to continue the stable 
operations. 


Obituary, page 15 



MANDARIN 
12.30 Mardood. 

1.00 Danny Harrow. 
1.30 Sunbeam Talbot. 

2.05 Miinnehoma. 

2.35 Capability Brown. 

3.05 The Black Monk. 

3.35 Aslan. 


THUNDERER 
12.30 Snowy Lane. 

1.00 Danny Harrold. 

1.30 Farm Week- 

2.05 MIINNEHOMA (nap). 

2.35 Capability Brown. 

3.05 The Black Monk. 

3.35 Aslan. 


The Times Private Handtcapper's top rating: 2.05 MIINNEHOMA. 


GOING: HEAVY 


SIS 


12.30 HNSTERS HANDICAP HURDLE 

(£2.343- 2m 41 1 10yds) (8 dinners) 

1 2S1F51- MANNERS URROR 228 (CJJjBjS) (E P ratt) M Scudamm 012-0 SIMM 92 

2 31024-5 SHOWY LANE 23 (BFjS) (U & N PM Dd) M Pipe 4-11-9 PScoderaora 90 

3 0606-1*3 MARDOOD 24 (G) (J Frahetr) P Lscti 7-10-5 - H Daria B 

4 662021- MADRAJ 194(F) (P Sfcrtri RB3to4-1lH WMcFartrt 33 

5 0P3-0O4 FREE JUS1CE 7 (S) (Mn C Sato) A J man MM A VMM 98 

6 00,31 OS- MUSICAL MONARCH 317 ($} (SMtoati) o Bnra 6-100 R Snoot (3) 87 

7 41P-652 MOHEU 18 (0,0 {6 tMtt) P Itaufty 5-10-0 RFwartp) 83 

B OraX» TANDERAGff 579 (BF.S) (J Bo*w) Kta N 9ape 11 -ID-0 DTigg - 

Lone lunOap: tm Jusaco 9-Ttt Uafcto Mown Ml Uobtf M. I«toao»94l 

BETTING; 5W 4-MMnod. 5-1 Rw-Jattc*. 13-2 ItattL 7-1 Mrioa Utoa, 10-1 Uttal 

Mora: ch, 10-1 Moteh. 50-1 Tmtagat 

1991: CAPABUTY BROWN *-185 P Sarawra (9-4 to} V Pip* 14 rai 


1 .00 ARLINGTON PREMIER SERIES CHASE 

(Qualifier £3,687: 2m 3t 110yds) (5 runners) 

J 02312-2 DANNY HARROLD 14 (D.F,S) (Iks S BUmbs} ATmel 8-11-10 S MtJM 92 

2 0111-iF IMfORD QUAY 21 (DJ.S.S) W Jontt) M Rpe 9-11-5 PSetetoim B 

3 34 P-568 CTIYNDEX 20 (F*pi»Hq«s*PW«tota)l»SWBl tit* PI** 50 

4 36PP-13 GRANGE BRAKE 16 (BJJF.65) (lb* J Matt) N TMmdo-Omo 8-10-12.. CUwN*i 52 

5 4YPP-40Z BLE-O-VAUA IB ID Straws) T HtoM B-10-2 WMtfrtnfl 50 

BETTW& 10-H VH Gay. ll-B0»n»H»n*. 101 tonga Brte. IB-1 WfrO-tott. 50-1 My kite. 

1991: RQUJIG BAU. 8-TMO P Scutem n-S to) M P|» 5 m 

FORM FOCUS 


DMWY HARROU) 3 2nd oMO » Dwp Strata 
hi 9* 0«*» HAT Water CtBM to As»l (2m 3 
110yd. goad la sot) hftflKD QUAY II 2 nd ol 3 
to ChenyMno hi a dust to UBocto on ncwNnato 
a^uSsi, good). GRANGE BRAKE 8f Wol T to 


Aorta Ctflone in ■ sotica hstteap 
Ora TiOrt won to sbB>- BUSj-Vi 
10 Id Lm Or The Rada tain 
chut a Nwtoi 

SSfcctar OMMYtoM 


erases Ascol 
'ALLA 41 2nd flt 
notiea tanflap 

■ nwn 


1 .30 JACK BROWN HANDICAP CHASE 

(£4,337: 3m 21 110yds) (12 Miners) 

1 1BUP/1-3 CUSHWST0WN 18(BF(LS) (StDCtr) 


21DP3-3 W0006ATE 32 (CD.OS) (S SaifttWY) T Forsto 1M1*4 

3 22246-4 JUST SO 16 (C.SXH Coto) H Me 9-11-4— .-- -- 

4 2ii3 M calabrese 10 &pafMSi (Mo a f«») n r*s«ta*w t-im. 

5 4311341 YWA&4X 31 (CD.CLS) (M MreD) DBnaa 101013 

- .. ... 4> me nn in W mim J Ii nine B.1IL 


PScutamora 87 

CUmByn 90 

SBaroogh 97 

aupto 92 

_ Httotas 83 

M Pane 92 

G Upton SI 

Altagoka 95 

OToao 85 

EMcKtotoy 88 

R Data (7) 63 

SMefM - 


& 4311341 YWABMai iffluii;"™"™ JSLTJEr” 

6 222512- SEA BLAM) 269 (CflF.aS) (R *»IB4 M P1(« 8-10-11^ 

J 144P-11 SUNBEAM TALBOT 37 

3 33/1024 FARM Wfflt 15 (DJ.6.S) (Lfltfl CWWda) G MBog 10-10-1 

9 FI F0P-3 0B6CT 19 (CS) fH ftyt) J fJHaAJ- 

10 1.T3WJ5 BEAU CWRM 18 (D^S) (UtKn* F6WQ Ltt J SklOfO 8-10 0 

11 1F5U-34 POP SONG 7 (aF.S) (6 Boa) G teB-JM---— - 

13 POPSflP SOME 00 18 (G5) (B Tteckat) J McOwodta 10-10-0 

Catena's ft« prttonnci S DM 1259 M Sandoan 

long Inmfcap: Dna 9-10. Baar Obdd M, Pm a*0 B4L Sana Do 7-12^ , 

BCTfwa 5-2 SU<X» T*oL 74: Sa Wand. 94! CwaiwaB. 6-1 Dnct 8-i taa So, 10-1 topi. 
>2-1 oms 

199V. YBAfiAN 9-10-10 N rto*a (5-1) 0 Baua 11 n 

FORM FOCUS 


CUSHMSTOkW 3*tl 3rd ol 4to BWHd Mini 
tattoo dnse d WSntak (3m 3, sani - WOD- 
6ATE 33 3nl H 5 to R«mw JJto g _* 
dBseNE*to(3mHoo«0 
6 o Esin Ness « J hawtcM chase NJmcanton 
(3m II 110yd. good) YTRASAN tWI SWng GoW 
it ta a 4-nnw hattop i 


i chase lm m Apni (3m, 


, SEA SLAM) 3)41 2nd ol 19 to EBtot to l 
chase a Cha totan Qm , oobO. 

TAraorfiearSftaantarJneahud i 

an n - nwat te ttetp ttttt a Stafcrt pm 41 

good). DfftECT 10MI 3rd id 17 a tettwn n a 
iMi di cap chase a Windsor (3m, soQJ. 

Sl SUNBEAM TAIB0T 


2.05 RSIEARSAL CHASE 

(Limited handicap: Grade H: £15.970: 3m) (4 Miners) 


BBC1 


1 01 IMF COOL GROUND 14 (BF^D GS) (WNcsnte Mavr) GBaftflng 1IMM3_ A Magntra ffl 

2 147111- UWlCrOMA 2£9 (CO^^S) (F San) M Pipe 9-10-7 P Scudamore ffi 

3 444P0R- BDNAIBA BOY 245 (CO/,S,S) (Ua A UaUe) U P^e 11-70-7 HDntas 9) 

4 11133-1 RUN FOR FREE 17 (CAF.G.5)(Ui3MFitt8WM Pipe 8-10-7 MPanS 92 

BETDNtt Etas utanhona. 7-4 An Fa Free. 7-3 Cool Grand. 20-1 Sanaa Boy 

1991: CAHWTS HU. 9-11-12 P ScoCfemn (7-4 to) M Pipe 6 ran 


FORM FOCUS 


COOL 6R0UND 23W 481 ol 7 to Tlntag ten to a 

C I D a Chsa a Weiherby (3m good). 

Jut So 71 In a B-fiiner hnficap data here 
In Fetmoy (3m GL sot), ttti BONANZA BOY 


(151) tana 08) Mdied up. 

iMmsaiAbea Biadbay 


m Bndhoy Stv VI to DM grade l 


Sun AUiarca On a O Wto d m to Math (3m. 
pod], nidi RUN FDR FRS ID 3nL 
RUN FOR F1SE town ori to baa Jodarl 31 ta a 
4-nimer chss a Hajdoci on saasmal dabto (3m. 
JOflJ. 

Sstocdort imenMA 


2.35 PAUUNE RICKETTS 5B0i CELEBRATION HANDICAP HURDLE 

(Amateurs: £1 576: 3m) (9 runners) 

1 161001- CAPABUTY BROWN 228 (CQ£&S) (0 Into) II Ptoe 5-12-0 D Pipe (7) 96 

2 34FPP4I 0EW.-SV)VI£Y14{S)a*sASa»««lR(ttre9-IW C Bbiks-Ws (7) - 

3 605-230 TQP JAVALM 2B (S) Uto J Ralp) 0 Banos 5-10-0 * Hurts (7) S 

4 2P20EM SttSTON 12 (B/.S) (Kiwadi RBoTtog Ud) W G UTiirei 7-100 DStaer(7) - 

5 RfOQRPP- TQRXABAR 235 (S] (N Cdtann-Stoaa) D Wttami 7-10-0 ItosVHalp 82 

6 63-4042 CQXANN 12 (Gj) (J Biancrt) J UcCoonoeTK 6-10-0 ETobrt (J) 80 

7 512-103 SIM SHONROCK 12 (Dfl (KOgdadGItarer 1IM04J_ 0 Johnson Hougtoo p] - 

B 5-P3050 PA00Y BUCK 16 (F5) (J MmeytsC) J HonqihgB 12-180 MssTHonqtnl (7) - 

9 /0P4M DREADNOUGHT 18 (S) g Cantos) R HoftsneaJ i2-i04> — J Carder (7) - 

Long handcar Top Jatota M3. Sheen 9-7. Tortaba 94L Caam 8-1 1. San Stomdc 8-10. Paddy Butt 
mMaflh 

BETIM& « CapadAy Brwto. 2-1 Top Jr*. 10-1 Shaaoa 20-1 Own. Oort's Wtof. 33-1 odaas. 

1981: TARKOVSKY 6-10-3 M Armrtaga (11-4 to) R Let 11 on 


3.05 GOOD LUCK SELLING HURDLE 

(4-Y-0: £1,492: 2m 41 110yds) 7 runners) 

1 1531B1 THE BLACK MONK 15 (V/JLS) (PlpdScutanoA Rkoq) M PSpa 11-9- PSoatonore fi 

2 2324-72 CASBWE IB (F.B) (btkritx (SttB WuQ UQ P UBjUfV-t fifanrtp) 88 

3 00-7042 GRSrS1HORBURN12ltoiRJBunm)AUoore114) JCtoha(7) « 

4 P SUPERH00msi8{M»Vlte«DWBami1i-O Mr6Le«to(7) - 

5 022644) TRUST DOT 16 (Fita Carts) tos A Kh«m 11-0 SMeNai 84 

6 S-P5633 NORTHERN VTMST 10 (B Uwrthn) B Ueaelyn 1M Mr J L Umretja (7) 71 

7 53-5SS5 STAftffORD LAM It (*l fiadbaiks) R tenttag 10-9 HOtoe* 80 

BETTMG: 1-2 The Btack Mate 8-1 Castote Tnst Date 10-1 Thorton. 16-1 Sa* Halite 
20-1 otoao. 

1991: RAGTME 4-11-0 D J Badafl (7-« tow) D BKhtf 9 is 


3.35 KUIN¥fiCK CHAMPIONSHIP STAKES NATIONAL HUNT RAT 
RACE (£4,464: 2m 110yds) (11 tunnets) 

1 11 ASLAN 20 (S) (J Diet) Jkamy Fteganid 4-11-7 WDaio - 

2 10-1 KQNVSCTA CONTROL 21 (S) ponokta Ud) J O'Neil 5-11-7 ADabbta - 

3 1M au.YBORU 35 (S) (P Mm*) AOttaon 4-11-4 Mr T McCarthy - 

4 41 GORT10 (S)(F Ntea) Mas KMmn 4-11-4 MHeartgai - 

5 1 NAVAL BATHE 35 (S) (P Owl) J Mmi 5-11-4 DFtatt - 

6 0-3 CAWARRA BOY 35 pits Mamaa Kenyan Kaldn)C -toes 4-1 14) iWMam - 

7 02 OASSSCHlMra 18 ©BaataO Bams 4-114) R Greene - 

B 3 SEA PATROL 35 (Artbur UMa) M Pip* 5-11-0 DRMtofflrt - 

9 S4 ALICE SMITH 10 Ota J H E Eddeg) B Edtay S-1M RFarW - 

10 32 BEAimflR. DREAM 10 (DuMmen Start) R Bate 4-100 TTborapsan- 

11 4 DLLEACHTA IB (Data Baij) J Moore 5-10O P Moore - 

BETRNQ: 11-4 Aste 7-2 BTI» Bren 5-1 KOmtoto CortmL 11-2 Sea Patofl. 8-1 (tod Bata. 10-1 6m. 
14-1 Shea 


1991: NO CORRESPONQW RACE 


COURSE SPECIALISTS 


TRAINERS 

Wins 

Rns 

% 

JOCKEYS 

Wtoms 

RSdB 

% 

MFtM 

52 

178 

2R5 

PSojcteaare 

46 

121 

38.0 

Nfondtosn 

JEdwds 

8 

10 

51 

52 

210 

192 

Si jS5b 

4 

6 

29 

54 

138 

11.1 

AYton 

3 

18 

107 

MPwed 

3 

30 

1O0 

N ntiston-Oatias 

6 

37 

162 

OrtytyoOlhn 




D Baron* 

11 

76 

145 





□ Desert Orchid could be 
allowed to go home on Tues- 
day having made a good 
recovery from surgery for a 
twisted gut Surgeon Tim 


Greet said: “He has made 
excellent progress." Desert Or- 
chid will ret ur n to the Leices- 
tershire stud of his owners, foe 
Bunidge family. 




i 


Hopes rise as 
rain abates 


HOPES are high foal today’s 
three meetings will go ahead. 
Sandown was passed fit after a 
2pm inspection and unless 
there is heavy rain the pro- 
gramme should take place. 

Nick Chcyne, the clerk of 
the course, said: "The forecast 
is basically dry and no further 
inspections are planned.” 

At Chepstow, derfc Rodger 
Farrant reported the frtidc 
raccable yesterday. "Unsettled 
weather is forecast but there 
will be no inspection unless 
there is further heavy rain." 

Wetherby's meeting was 
never seriously threatened but 
the fourth scheduled fixture. 
Towcester, was abandoned on 
Thursday. , 

There are no problems for 
Monday's two meetings at 
Edinburgh (good) and War- 
wick (soft, heavy patches). 


Racing next week 

MDAY: Wawck, EtflBugR- 
ESDAY: SedtjetejVJ. Pumptan. war 

Rascn. 

DAESOAY: Hjydock Park. Worcas- 
UqgfeUPvfc (AIKWraDtart. 

UftSQAY: Haydoc* Pa*- “aunioi. 
aJwrefl (ASwtraThw) . . 

DAY; ChtfWWiam. Ocncxx*. 

rUROAY: Chettortiam, Doncaacr. 
"tough, ungiieW Park 
{Fltem«otWB» lnboW ' 



N DARIN _ _ 

« Eurotwlst 1.15 Wind Force. 1.4S Abbot Ctf 
ness. 2.15 Dawson dty. 2.45 Nos Na Gaotthe. 3.15 
Kle Monarch. 

JNDERER _ _ , 

afi Eurotwlst 1.15 Many Master. 1.45 Cheerful 

UTiscSraon City. 2.45 OM Applejack. ai5 

^le Monarch. 

HARD EVANS: 3.15 THISTLE MONARCH (nap). 


GOING: SOFT 


SIS 


THORP ARCH NOVICES HURDLE 

^ 5 : 2 m) (t framers) 


6TTnn5oa(7) 

nuuinJ 14 M H EMWtff 11-4..--, LWg 
yUJARO 78F S Norton 10-12 RHMgp) 

wnorjif j »"» w T5 aiS 

' Pferiey 

— KJOOH 


GHT PAWN 14 J Lrt^i 10-12—. 
TON ROOMS ZflF D Gndon 10-12- 
5S«NCASIlEJ1We1IM2-- 


WHW 12 IteVtattto 10-12 P WWjfg 

JSS 


J tww W ■■ ■ ^ 

IBHY30FWE1SW 10-7— 

AH B J Tune 10-7 

3-1 EBBwfeL 4-1 Bpfl. 7-1 VRT Brtoaa. H tows 


JJdrtra 

WRyp) 


) WHARFE HANDICAP CHASE 

; 3m 110yd) (10) 


_ 7-12-0 6 MeCOUI 
MM7-1I-5-- 

R AmnfRje B-ll-5 

GaeAmqitage 

rmFfta jHMids 0-11-4 NWtaaam 
■^K^MWtattrt77 10.tt ertfr 

TiamMHDFESi tea S Sato 11-10-tt— 

kudy trkx imfjaa m “"""SS^-TftSSS 

PAOHC SOU® 9 C&S) 105 S an® 9-1M 
GALAD8E 7S9 M H En*t» 10-1M_- - r .~ — 

BUCKte IT UP TS (D,5) A Maragprt 7-1M. » D 
are. 4-1 WM ftrea. 5-1 Sweat StetotaM Tl» P«e. 7-1 abes. 


1 .45 ATS HANDICAP HURDLE (£2.976: 2m) (6) 


1 SH CTOWJimBM . 
; on AfiflOTOFRWeSSIl 


BMOMIOB9-11-10— z tW* 
G (Wade 3-11-7 _ n Dmgtoy 


3 -W0 MOWTAM KMGOOM 14 SDf£) N Tatar 8-11-0 G McCout 

4 3-04 

5 14-P 
$ Dt4- 

9-4 HM 01 Fwneis. 3-1 Band lire. 4-1 Saaaoy. Pstottag. 7-1 rttec. 


) U HamreMd 5-10-10 Pltoen 

.DiFiS) J Itetoe 6-100 K 

5291 ®K Moran 5-5 W) ASSmB) 


2.1 5 DJCX WARDSI MBIOHIAL NOVICES CHASE 

(£4.191; 2m 51) (4) 


1 -211 DAWSON CITY 14 

2 -222 AfiTIWS 


D6HWBME Ms H BNI 6-11-0 

Of FRED KELLY 7 BfeSacfl 6-11-0. 


MHEJBBrtw 5-11-12 LWytr 

frfSl Mr P CBaeteatti 5-n-0 
ITATbontaR 

GMbCopB 

BStorejr 


2-5 Danson c»r, n-4 ArtarsMtoett. 20-1 End felly, 25-1 Dmrgrte. 


2.45 aiMERDALE HANDICAP CHASE 

(£3.522: 2m 5f) (7) 


| Fiy YOUNG BOC 595 rt^MH&B»l» 8-120. LWj*r 

2 5-16 OU)APPLEMOC35pfAS)JJtanw 12-10-13 NtaUryfi) 

3 -220 NOS NAGWmc 21 (8£^) U H laSPtff 9-10-11. R Ganky 

4 0311 U&MM0 14 ff£5)j item 6-10-9 ALziad>(7) 

5 50P-3 ASTRERAaaiLi2*&abtas arem 7-10-2- JCAaban 

6 453U WOWBUCK S RCfcee 3-100 D Mare® (5) 

7 -311 8UW SPUR 9 (FAS)JCWtoe 10-100 B Storey 


3-1 Legertnn. 4-1 Btek Sjn. M Ms n Gscafa. 5-1 WranxL B-1 Old 

Appapn. B-1 Yoong Be*. 14-1 Attr Rtem 


3.1 5 WALSHF0RD NATIONAL HUNT NOVICES 
HURDLE (£2,145: 3m 11) (10) 

1 04 1 SYDUSAYS031(S>to?Qaatettt)6->M 

KATbarattaS 

2 201 TM5ILE M0NARQ1 9 (5) GSbcteS 7-11-4 NDdd^] 

3flW-5 BRfflBBI LAD 15 Tltote 0.10-12 Sitae 

5 CASTLE 0^8 23 J Oadfen SID-12 B Store 

0Q0 GLBI MBAffi 15 B M —tew 7-1D-12 S Cowto 

23-4 KtE OF SmSMttaaeto 6.10-12 -P»« 


PP ROAD TO TI£WB1 15 Mbs Bate 5-10-12 — J Bate ( 

umr KEON 654 J Itocte 7-10-7 HYHfan 

450 LADY BLAKOEY11 6 fW»nf s-uj- 7 GCtf 


03P- UUCKY HARVEST 343 Us A fte* S10-7_ Jb^ Dates ( 
54 teteB Mracb, 7-2 ■ Yoa say So, 0-1 Gte ttu. ID-1 Kng Ol tei 
Casta Qntt. 1M Brtt» ua. 20-1 mm. 


COURSE SOCIALISTS 


TRAMBtt: j Ctetton. 5 aouea bm 17 nm 204*^ G FtteanS, 

sssaB&gsum&sn 

29. 172V P «wn. 23 torn 140. 1641 (Ctty (jjafers). 



MANDARIN 
12^5 Now Your Talkin. 
12^5 Black Humour. 
1.25 Wonder Man. 

1 .55 Big BeaL 
2^0 VALFINET (nap). 
3.00 Uncle Ernie. 

3£0 Run Up The Flag. 


THUNDERER 
12.25 Now Your Taflan. 
1235 Black Humour. 
1^5 Wonder Man. 
1.55 Cambo. 

2.30 ValflneL 
3.00 Unde Ernie. 

3^0 MaScom. 


RICHARD EVANS: 12£5 Now Your Talkin. 3.00 Deep Sensation. 


GOING: SOFT. HEAVY IN PLACES (CHASE COURSE); HEAVY, BACK STRAIGHT 
SOFT (HURDLES) SIS 


12.25 CROWNGAP WINTER NOVICES HURDLE 

(Grade Ik £6,370: 2m 61) (4 runners) 

101 0-21111 NOW YOUR TALKM 14 {pfJS) U WrlgN) 0 Mcbotaon 6-11-7 R OneMXXty (9 

102 603111 GLEN L0CHAN 15 (F.S) (Lent Crtfeaa) Mbs K KrtgM 7-11-4 J Osborn 96 

103 11FI15 6A&STR0M 7 (B^) (MB J hate) N TaistonOnies 5-11-2 D Brtdgwsder 94 

104 654-PT3 CAR0MAL RED 1 6 (BAG) (Mb F W ahqiO Ws F Watoyn 5-110 BdaHao 92 

BETTOR 5-4 Nm You Tafcn. 6-4 Gasteon, 7-2 Gltn Lodsn. 14-1 CxH Red. 


1991: ARABMN SULTAN 4-110 P 5adanne (7-4 to) M Pte 8 si 


12.55 SMUDGER BIRTHDAY CHASE CC4.7TS: 3m 110yd) (7 runners) 

201 4114-21 BLACK MJM0UR 24 (C.GLS) (R A BaB (Wlgmott SQ LM) C torts 011-10 G Boday 93 


3B 351102- AUCTION LAW 245 (O/Aq (Ms BGMkslO Banns 0110 NHatea 01 

203 1 4214-1 AV0I8LB« 19 (DAAS)(H spoor*) PHsdgw 0110 M Rttads 79 

04 2T13M CMABKESE 10 Ql£FJBJ5l (Ms A f J|)5i) N Hntosn 7-11-2 ROimworty © 

205 F1F2-11 COUNTRY MBOSI 31 (COA5) (Ms CWtaKS) A TimD 7-11-2 L Harrey 96 

206 0025571- THATSTWBUS9BS424 (fj W Km-Otoao) G BMdng 011-2 JFne 50 

207 2/2-P45P WTO MBSTRa 12(G) 01 tort) RChsmpton 7-1010 BPdmI SB 


BETTWG: iM Courty Msntoer. 9-4 Btatt tanar. 11-4 Cdstns*. 101 Awxttm. 12-1 otm. 
1991: NO COfiAeSPONDOiG RACE 


1.25 HBIRYVDI NOVICES CHASE 

(Grade It £7,500: 2m) (4 runners) 


C4 


301 240221 PEACE CWCffl 9 pHJYRttanJPHtaOB 011-4 HRUwdS 88 

302 321 1-1 U BLLY BATHGATE 15 (P/jS) (M tesrtdsy) N Hnknan 0110 J Kavanagti BB 

303 0405OT ROCHESTER 31 (Ms EMBhSRLaa 0110 MATtagaold - 

304 6401/1-1 WOOER MAN 12 (D.F&S) (Us S Rotate) D Mdokon 7-110 RDuiwoody 9 

BETTWG: 4-7 tarter ten. 2-1 Bfflrbftgfe 01 Peace Otter. 201 ItodKSB. 

1991: PEANUTS PET 0110 T VW (5-1) B Mtttoon 6 on 


FORM FOCUS 


PEACE omcsi beat remaned Weft In Odd i 

defines in an 0nmr nortce chase M teutan 

Em 31. good to 900). BOXY BATH6ATE bed Sto 

Rf 2jsi to a 7-rrms notice daseaferatsn in 
October (2m. good to sort). ROCHESTER tn con- 


tBttio Man branjht Own tar out behind SvbSSn 
to a notice chest to l )B— to (2m, (nod). WtW- 
DGR MAN beti Mn 01 tea West 19 to a 0nmr 
notice Obsb St 
Stiecflnc woidbt 


1 .55 THAMES VALLEY EGGS NOVICES HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£4,970: 2m 110yd) (14 runners) 


1-1 MAR1WS LAAP 23 (CD&S) PbsSti*ldi)J QBard 012-3- 


402 4011 BALLY CUM3 21 (D£^) 0** E RobeS) N Headem 011-12. 

403 150112 JAMB TW RRST 10 (D/^J (D Mctote P MchOta 4-11-7 

404 02-251 FAR BROTHER 9 (D£) (lbs S HUN 0 MunwSrrth 011-4 

SOM BW BEAT 12 (5) {FI (UtfBdfc) D Etoati 011-4. 


405 
400 

407 3G304 CAUTOUS 15 (R LmIb) G Bsttng 01013 

408 /3IR20P CATHOS 12 (P Afcn) D Wfa* 7-105 


1)43 G0LBL DANCER 19 (tts J WsO 0 6rtssal 4-11-2. 


_ PWdsp) SO 
. RDuiwoody 91 
MAFtogstod 92 
— - JWhto 87 

P Holey m 

JRMton 83 

JRost 04 


40S 0P634-R ROYAL PPER 14 (A Datagkm) D Bvons 0105. 

410 009013 CAMB0 14 (ILSMM Bate) M Banks 0104 

411 554-316 LARK BSE B (BF) (P Bens) Cretan 4-100- 


412 0PP25O- CROWN BALADS 108F (M Thogood) U Usher 0100- 

413 044243 THUNDER BUG 14 (C VWgrt) A James 4-100. 

414 304069 ALWAYS ALLE) 15 UtaHitaJ Joseph 0100- 


HteEBrema 93 

N forte 96 

D Skymw 92 

_ BQBcrdp) 93 

B9«nl BB 

. WbtosW($) 81 
BdaKno 88 


Long he n fap: Ite Mss 08. Qmn Bahda 9-6. Thotoer Beg 013. Ahoys Ailed 010 

KTTW& 01 Lama 02 Bin Bad. 01 8dly Ctonr. 110 R* Bro&er. 01 JmesTheFlaL^l Carnto 

Catau Rebel 101 Royal Pfer. 201 SrteU tenoer. 301 alien 

1891: MUSE 4-10-11 A Roctor (07) O Bnd 14 an 

FORM FOCUS 


MAFTTWS 1AIV bed Cool Ctowo S in 1 17- 
naer notice a IjmxsM ( 2 n adU. «th 
FAST BROTHS (13U) OeOet 0 ?) 28 sOaUY 
CLOVHI beat Emerald Met 31 h an 11-nraer 
notice lead cap lude a) Chetartom (an 110yd. 
good to soB). elm LARK RISE (9tti hefler ol) 
treated hts rider, when to cotertton. jne.ou. 
JAMES T>€ F«ST 3 2nd cl 13 to Snffing CrteS 
to a sotice lentaap ludto to Wtocannn (2m. 


Doom. FAIR BROTHBl toi WN* Stager 61 In a 

I0nuaar notice toOe * Itoton 0n iLopod ® 

sofl). BIG BEA7 beai Canuotao GM 29ta a 
awes tOTfle a Fotetoie pm II 110yd. sol). 

SOIBL DANC81 3 3rd oMS to RU Prate In a 

notice lude al Wtadsor (2m. soB). CAbK) 8 W 
ol 8 to Now Ytw Takto to a notice rurtteap hide 
to Atones pm 4f, jpod to sod). 

Setoctton: MARTWSLAMP 


GUIDE TO OUR 1N-UNE RAOECARD 


1 113143 GOOD TMESIS (BFJ£5) (Ms DRcbhooa) Bite 120 


B West (7) 88 


ttocead rwta Sa-figue lam (F — left. P— 
prtiea wl (/— wseaed into. B— brou^a 
(km S — doped n>. R — irtused. D — 
cfisqurtfiadl. Hone's came. Cite since tot 
outing. F t BaL (B — bfirtHL. V — tisa. H — 
hood E~EyshieitL C — couse tenet. D— 
co— couse art dtence 


tens BF — beaten toons m laea taca). 
Going on atoich hotss las eon (F — tom. good la 
(ton. hard G — good S— art. good to son, 
heavy). Owner m brade& Tnrar Age and 
ertita- FMar plus any dlnonct The Timas 
Prtelc Ifereteapper'i fating. 


2.30 WILLIAM HILL HANDICAP HURDLE 

(Grade ill: £20,750: 2m 110yd) (10 runners) 

501 3F2021 JUNGLE KMFE 7 (DlS) (N Cook) MToDfMm 011-10 

502 3500-21 EGYPT MILL PRMCE 21 (Bdf^) (S Wtab) Ms JPtbnan0110 

503 21-24 ONE MORE DREAM 22 (D.F) (M Jackson) 6 Baking 01013 

504 5191110 KDiG CREDO 241 (CD JFAS) (G Gonttl) S Wntotti 7-1013- 



505 1114-OU HSS BOBBY BB9IETT 9 (D/.CLS) (B OpaSick) M Pipe 01012 

506 022-412 JOPAMM 14 Q3JFJ&S) (N Buh) N Henderson 7-1010 

507 102112 IGLCASH IS (B.C0AS) (J Wheto) P Hedger 4-1010 

500 243001 EASY BUCK 14 (D.ILSl) (Buferd Lautty LBJ) N GaseJee 0100 (4e0 — 

509 31401-1 VAUBCT 21 ®).6^) IF ftnte) M PSps 0102 |4 b) 

510 1 MAAMUR BF (G) (PM kdmttai Suntas (Wales) Ltd) D Bwhei 0100 . 

Long hmlcap: Manat 011. 

BETTWfi: bans Vtfftt. 01 KBcadu 01 JnpnH. 101 Easy Bte. 12-1 Jntfb Kite 101 EgypiMIB Prince. 
King Credo, (toe More Dream, 401 Maanv. 601 Mss Bobhy Bernal 

1991: BALASANI 0100 M Pm* (7-1) U Pipe 20 tan 

FORM FOCUS 


JUNGLE KMFE 71 2nd ol 6 to Baydon Sta to a 
handicap horte at Aatoae (2m 110yd. and to 
art).lGYiT MU. PRINCE teal BdsUata 251 
in a (Bruner notice doM to CheTfenton (2m. 
nod to ate ONE MORE DREAM SMI last rt 4 to 
Sbindi Frand to a ludie at Cheteilan (2m 
110yd, good to soft). KBC CRffiO bte Rodeo 
Star ZMIto tie 10-nnoar Impeia) Hudte over 
ctuse an) dtaance (good) to Msdi vtiti EGYPT 


MU PRINCE flBli betar off) 6MI 50i NLCASH 
Ml 2nd o) 6 to Irtsfia's Son In a handicap tamDe N 
Wncarton [2m. mod). 

EASY BUCKbte JWUM {lOb beOB off) 31 in a 
I0nnw haaficao lastte a) Ascot (2m 110yd. 
good to art). VALFBCT heal KetN 31 in a 9-nmar 
tandtep hodle al Chettnham (2m 110yd. good to 
art). 

Stedtan: VALFWET (nap) 


3.00 MITSUBISHI SHOGUN TINGLE CRSC TROPHY 

(Limited handicap chase: Grade II: £12,260: 2m) (5 runners) 

601 11132-1 WATERLOO BOY 32 (COTAS) !M Deetoy) D iMttstii 0120 RDomtoody B2 

602 423F-14 IB«L£BWE11 (DAS) (A Budge (Eqw) lifl Jenmy Ftogerrtd 7-11-4 M teryw 96 

603 214-221 SaGATMW 14 (R EUoO J BtoMTl 7-107 DMupby ffl 

604 1522-16 EDGERG 21 (CDf.G^) (H DarDgr) J Johnson 0107 A Orkney 96 

605 BD-J51J MR mix 33 PU&S) toaterfs Vtodw & Sod fl Chaitton 0107. BPoate 50 

Long hanOcap: Deqi Seosten 10-5, Etavg 011. Mr Felbc 6-B. 

BETTW& 110 Unde Ernie. 130 Wrterioo Boy, 7-2 Deep Senatai. 101 Edbag. 5001 M Fete 
1991: WATffiLOO BOV 011-13 R Dwoody (70 lav) D McMsoa 6 on 


FORM FOCUS 


WAmOO BOY bsl Katattec 51 in a 5-namer 
□arts I area to Exetor (2m 3. good). UNCLE 
BIKE rttestfno ten Wl U to a 4-nira 
grade 8 chase a lufingrim (3ti 41 110yd. good to 
art), M lunxrtsd to totah a dteanca 4ti to 
Rontons Man. 

DEEP SENSATION beat Damy Ham*) 3 to toe 
10-flOB grade l H & T Wate Chase al Ascot las 
(ton od0n3 110yd. good to ate SWERG 33 


fill ol 16 Id Tlpptog Tim to the goda HI itadeon 
Gold Civ at awArtam last lime ou (2m 41 
110yd. good » son). Pretiousiy. heal Emsee-H 13 
to a 0nnw handicap chase here (2m 41 110yd. 


: completed a double teen besing Carte 

Chimes 61 to a 7-naner lanjfcap chase to 
nimjtan f 
Setocttac 


3.30 DOUG BARR0TT HANDICAP HURDLE (£3,551: 2m 6f) (8 runners) 

1 300510 HXYJ0E1B8(n#.F,S)(rftt*l^ JOsboma 90 

2 020132 PETOSKU 28 (G5) (f hffls) it Tvdton-Ctatits 4-110 CUnteyn 90 

3 021025 WCBtOY fSTBI 24 HOfiFf&SI (F Bmxn) P Mughy 7-1013 — NMam 87 

4 061-152 ANWQNBERUN 15 p.GJS) (I Cwy) R Lea 01012. EHenwy (5) 95 

5 030011 BUN U9 THE R>6 17 (F^) (Pel-mefl teraws) J GiBorri 01011 DFAephy SO 

E 041500 SR CRUSTY 7 (CW : ,S,5) (M Ash) 0 OWe# 101011 VSWWy(5) 9 

7 P3Q03F MALCOM 15 (S) pteUcom Pic) Mn J PKnan 010-4 B Pom* 90 

8 600230 TUP JAVALM 28 (S) (M& J Rejp) D Banns 0100 2odpni » 

Too Janie's tan pitereoca b the 205 ran a Cbepanv 
Long rmfeap: Top JBnln 08 

BETTMG: 5-C Rui Up The Ftag, 11-4 Malcom. 7-2 Peuttu. 7-1 Top JKdto. 12-1 Antaontt Rn. 101 Sa 
Ditty, tiesoy Jester. 101 Hc^ Joe. 

1091: THE MOGET FMN 011-7 D Matey (01) J GBont 9 on 


COURSE SPECIALISTS 


TRAINERS 

Jmmy Rborartri 
UP« 

P Hedger 
C BaSa 
DGrraeU 
DMnpySmte 


Wte 

Rns 

% 

JOCKEYS 

Wtonen 

redes 

% 

3 

8 

STS 

J Law 

3 

s 

SOB 

15 

55 

273 

Nitre 

5 

12 

41.7 

3 

11 

Z72 

MDwya 

3 

9 

332 

15 . 

56 

262 

MPKmsi 

5 

2D 

25JQ 

6 

24 

2S.0 

M Richards 

5 

22 

22.7 

4 

20 

200 

B He Kan 

5 

2? 

22.7 


Cahervillahow to top 
bill at Punehestown 

From Our Irish Racing Correspondent in Dublin 


CAHERVILLAHOW has 
been an cinfocky horse, with a 
career foal has been dogged 
by disqualification and injury. 
He is foe winner of only five 
steeplechases but still heads 
foe Irish handicap. 

Michael Morris still hopes 
his chaser will one day win a 
Cheltenham Gold Cup and if 
those aspirations are to be 
realised, he should win foe 
Ir£20.000 Durkan Brothers 
International Punehestown 
Chase tomorrow. 

On his last outing 
Cahervillahow was lying sec- 
ond when coming down be- 
fore halfway in a contest which 

eventually was won by Rich- 
aid Dunwoody’s mount. 
Jamalade. 

In third place then was 
Garamycin, who won the 
Punehestown Chase last year. 
The handieapper deaity does 
noi fancy his chance of com- 


pleting a double for whereas 
he rated Cahervillahow 3)b 
superior at Faiiyhouse, under 
the conditions here he receives 
101b. 

Another fended runner is 
General Idea, who finished 
fourth to Tipping Tim in foe 
Mackeson Gold Cup at Chel- 
tenham, but he would prefer 
better ground. 

An enormous Irish gamhle 
on Tiananmen Square went 
astray at Cheltenham in 
March when he was beaten by 
his compatriot Montdado in 
the Tote bumper. 

Subsequently. Tiananmen 
Square reversed foe pterin gs 
in another flax race encounter 
with Montelado- He is an 
exciting recruit to jumping, 
who makes his debut over 
hurdles ax Faiiyhouse this 
afternoon. Those who have 
seen him school have been 
much impressed- 


WSM 






Nottingham 

doing: good to oott (chasa cane); son 
(htrtlsa), sort after 1 00 race 
1230 (2m Met 1. BOOGIE BOP9ER (M 
Footer. 150 lab: 2, Grand FeBowJTarea 
Braybrook. 33-1): 3. Ponbcrod Bd (M 
25-1) ALSO RAN: >2 


_ Snatod Lady (pul. 12 Mettameh 
1 . 14 Cahmy Prince. 20 Gttden Ancona. 


33 ftaoonanL ftiyai Chart (6th), 50 
Ctagtiteai, EmmsVlctara. Lad Trilby. 15 ran. 
2M. 1L r*. 15L 5L u pipa at Weitognn. t« 
£3.70, £2.10. £1720, £060. DF: C142D0. 
CSF. £5831. Auction details: Wtoner bcu^il 
nhr aaoogns. 

1 ro (3n era 1 . SAHTORUra (H Dorfee. 1 1 -41. 
2. NoManta^onaral (M Dwyer. 4-6 fad: 1 
KSaU rfi Duwoody. 12-1). ALSO RAN: 4 
Mere Ctoss (0. 33 GteW Boy (pul. 50 
Goldfinger (m 8 mn. 10L TSl 41 T flwnjon 
Jonas Uppor Lernbom. Tot? £3.10: £1.40, 
£1.70. DFTfiLIO CSF: £532. 

130 Cm 51 ilOyd 1. LE PXXXXABE (R 
Duwoody.l^ -2 fcr.toKlarin’o nap & Private 
Handcappetis top raUnta; Z On Ymt Way 
(Mr WflSsfBn, 501); a Kttte Dwfry P 
Suppte, 12-1). ALSO RAN: 7-2 Hte BWhtt 
(ou), 12 Royal Cater (4th). 20 SotoBCs 
Ocice 1501), 25 H And Cng> (fth). 7 ran 
N ft Attaonay Otal 3L W. 10L dst 2L N 
Hantereon at Lamboun Tow £1.70: £130. 
E5.5Q. DF: C4570. CSF: H3B3 Tricast 
£151.05. 

UB lan Itib) I, TAIWAN PRINCESS 
miBia Oaf, 01): 2, And Mo (P MWa 2-1 
&L' 3. Rucsrtn VWon (H Doties, 01). ALSO 
RAN: 1 1-4 Hove A Mgncop (Bn). 8 Ful 9aa 
—fl. 2D OotanW Beauty (prA 3 MsUc den 
g. 7 ran. NR: Mortapw, Dutton htemtoy, 
— Itedal. 2KL 7L T2L 2HL8LWCttyo( 
. r-Trw time £060: £200 £130 DF: 
£860. CSF: £23.66. 

235 fim SI 110yd tti) 1. EMILY'S STAR (C 
IMa 01): aSttUon Lane (N WB«nsoa 
8040 w;B. Lady Remain ds 1 (B SKfW, 10 
a. ALSO RAN: 3 (4lh), B Utlfftere 

(ffii), 14 Manners unmo (Sih), a Qua 
Dawi (a). Psretaa'e ftee (w). 40 Nutaae 


(Oi^. 8 ran. BL 2HL 44L 20L 3W. N TMaon- 
Dawas ar CfWtenfnm. Tc« £5.40: Cl 80. 
£1 TO. £130 DF: £7 10. CSF: £i7 62. Tricast 
£7037. 


3X>5 Qm4l hefle) 1. 
frl; mmderere n 


. i); 2. Ptftertonto L 
7-2 fati; 3, Mjctfa Tycoon (P 
. J, 01). ALSO RAN; 6 Catoc Brass 
.B Coarm (4th). 9 Qymcrak Gamble, 
" 10 Thamesdowi Toots*, i2Land- 


jpo)n 

Nffiaoa 


n IW W, 20. ft 3JW 121 M AMSOR tt 

iSSi Sr-ZSto&Si V ■» E3^.e3JO. DF: 
520-80 CSF: £2700. Tneasf £10623. 

32S (2m uae) 1 . JOKESOW U Kaoaocti. 2- 
“1 Peran. 11-11:3. Just 
ted. ALSO AW 11 
Crel (fldfl, ie Cl* 
And Ete (4ihL 20 Trenate Vataur (pu). 25 
NotetoM (pu). Bran. WT. RtevN-Sun. ISLte 
hd, 51 1141 41 C Nate at wanton. Tata: 
23-00. 21.10. £1.60, £l£0. DF: £TlS). CSF: 
£2229 Tncost 231.77. Ptotepot 59,10- 


RACEL?fSlE 


FULL RESOLTS SERVICE 

1 - 168-168 









\ 






















30 SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


Saturday portrait: Eric Cantona, by Peter Ball 


Football’s rebel with 
applause rides on 
in search of his niche 


J I U3TTWH0W. ffTEVEMftBIM 


w 


ith George Best. Denis 
Law, Mailt Pearson, 
Johnny Morris and Nor- 
man Whiteside in their pantheon. 
Manchester United are used to 
forwards of great talent but often 
fiery personality. It remains to be 
-seen whether their past experi- 
ences have prepared them for Eric 
Cantona, the enfant terrible of 
French football, who begins his 
United career tomorrow in the 
. heated environment of a 
Manchester derby. 

Cantona moved to United a 
week ago from Leeds, where he 
had quickly become a folk hero, 
bringing a Gallic flair to the 
workaday team that had won the 
'Football League championship. 
Notably, he left a heartbroken 
support behind him. 

The move to Leeds’s greatest 
rivals only exacerbated the dismay 
■in West Yorkshire. But as well as 
sublime talent, which has led to 
him being dubbed “the Gallic 
Gazza”, he leaves a trail of discord 
in his wake from earlier days. 
United, with their histoiy of wel- 
coming maverick stars, have taken 
a gamble that they will provide the 
‘ stage on which his undoubted 
talent can flourish. 

As the minimal fee for his 
transfer, just over £1 million, 
suggests, it is a gamble. There are 
two areas of doubt, the footballer 
and the man. Nobody questions 
Cantona's ability, but there is a 
lingering doubt about his effective- 
ness. particularly in dealing with 
the demands English football 
makes of its forwards. 

“After just two or three days in 
training, I knew we were witness- 
• ihg a player of special natural 
talents.'’ Howard Wilkinson wrote 
in his recent autobiography, add- 
ing that because of the “funda- 
mental problem of playing styles”, 
Cantona's chances of succeeding 
in English football were less than 
even. 

• A more damning conclusion 
came from Michel Platini, at the 
end of his spell as manager of 
France. Platini, who bad restored 
Cantona to the national team. 
Began to query his contribution 
when the chips were down. 
.Cantona being a particular disap- 
pointment in the European 
championship. 

Although Platini made no criti- 
dsnts on the record, he reportedly 
told his confidants in the French 
football press “He is a big player 


in small matches, but a small 
player in big matches.” Recent 
events suggest Wilkinson eventual- 
ly came to a similar conclusion, 
although Alex Ferguson, his new 
manager, believed that Cantona 
was Leeds's best player in their 
European Cup matches with 
Rangers. 

That may be overstating the 
case, but certainly he provided the 
only serious threat to Goram in the 
second match at Ell and Road, and 
had his finishing matched his 
ability to fashion chances for 
himself in that game, there is little 
doubt that he would now be the 
toast of Leeds, rather than carrying 
the can for their poor run. 

But that aside, there were un- 
doubtedly footballing reasons for 
Wilkinson's decision. Although 
6ft, Cantona is slimly built and his 


With his brooding looks, 
arrogance and volatile 
temperament, he is 
football's James Dean . . . 
all jeans and black leather 


skills and imagination make him 
far from the usual English target 
man, but, playing him alongside 
Chapman, another six-footer, en- 
couraged Leeds to follow “route 
one”. That will not happen at 
United and Ferguson is convinced 
that his team's more cultured, 
creative style of play will suit 
Cantona better than Leeds’s typi- 
cally English, style. 

“We play differently to Leeds." 
Ferguson said, leaving little doubt 
that he expected Cantona to find 
the United style to his liking. He is 
equally certain about the player's 
ability to add an extra dash to 
United’s attack. 

“He threatens space; you saw 
with that eariy break against 
Rangers, he goes for die gaps,” 
Ferguson said. “The most impor- 
tant thing is that he has tremen- 
dous ability. I hope we can add to 
that, because at this dub I think he 
has the potential to become a zeal 
giant" 

Ural we will see. There were 
encouraging signs even in 
Eusebio's testimonial match in the 
glorious Estadio da Luz on Tues- 
day. United did not have a single 


shot on target as they went 
through the motions at half pace, 
but there were moments when 
Hughes and Cantona looked to be 
on the same wavelength, some- 
thing which many of Hughes's 
previous partners searched for in 
vain over long periods. 

But if the jury is still out on 
Cantona the footballer, there is 
hardly more than one opinion 
about Cantona the man, particu- 
larly in the conservative, often 
unimaginative world of profes- 
sional football. "II est four was the 
immediate response of three 
French journalists who knew him 
from different periods during his 
career in France, a sped littered 
with rows, fights and suspensions. 

With his dark, brooding looks, 
arrogance and volatile tempera- 
ment be is football's James Dean, 
or, as a Frenchman, perhaps an 
Alain Delon character, all jeans 
and blade leather, riding moodily 
on a motorcycle through the streets 
of his native Marseille. In English 
football players who admire 
Rambo are not unusual; players 
who admire Rimbaud ana write 
poetry are likely to be regarded 
with slack-jawed incomprehen- 
sion. Even in French football they 
are likely to be looked at askance. 

Cantona, though, sometimes 
looks as if he has dedicated himself 
to living out Rimbaud’s surrealism 
and alienation. At only 26, he has 
had eight dubs (not counting his 
short period on trial with Sheffield 
Wednesday) in as many years. He 
began sedately enough, with 
Auxerre, returning there for a 
second spell after a brief sojourn at 
tire second division dub, 
Marti gues. But from then on his 
trouble came thick and fast 

tn 1 988 there was a year-long 
suspension from the national team 
for describing Henri Michel, the 
manager, as a bag of excrement; 
there were fights with team-mates 
at Montpellier and Auxerre; at 
Marseilles, he was suspended for 
throwing his shirt on the ground 
during a friendly. 

Perhaps most famous of all was 
his experience at N fines, his last 
dub before he arrived in England. 
Suspended for a month for throw- 
ing die ball at the referee, his 
appearance before a French foot- 
ball association disciplinary panel 
has gone into popular folklore. As 
sentence was passed, Cantona 
passed his own judgment “Idiot”. 
Asked to repeat the point, he 



walked up to each of them in turn 
and screamed “Idiot”. The ban of 
one month was doubled, and he 
promptly announced 1 us retire- 
ment, to be rescued initially by 
Sheffield Wednesday. 

That foiled to come to fruition, 
as Cantona walked out in hfeh 
dudgeon when Trevor Francis, the 
dub’s manager, wanted to extend 
his trial period. “A leetle problem 
blew up.” Cantona explained in a 
familiar phrase. 

By comparison, things were 
quiet at Elland Road. Initially, 
unlikdy as it appears, it seemed as 
if theen/onf terrible had found his 
spiritual home among the dour 
Yorkshiremen, while Ms wife and 


son settled happily after all the 
upheaval in France. 

He played a bit-part, but a 
significant one, in Leeds’s run-in 
to the championship last season, 
Storing three goals and lightingup 
Elland Road with flashes of bravu- 
ra. The supporters feQ in thrall to 
his skill and brooding presence — 
chants of “Ooh aah, Cantona” 
soon became the norm at Elland 
Road — and when, at the champ- 
ionship celebration, he told the 
crowd, “I don’t know why ! love 
you, but 1 do”, there was no doubt 
the feeling was reciprocated. 

He began this season in style, 
with three goals against Liverpool 
in die season’s pipeopener, the 


Charity Shield, but as Wilkinson 
feared, his ability to function in the 
rough told tumble of the English 
league came increasingly into 
question. 

In tiie end, he could not achieve 
it and the parting of the ways 
came quickly. Will it be any betta" 
at Old Trafford, where a combina- 
tion of Cantona and Ferguson 
looks combustible? 

As the Manchester press corps 
knows to its cost the United 
manager burns on a short fuse at 
times, and although usually the 
storm rapidly blows itself out it is 
questionable whether Cantona, 
will wait long enough to discover 
that 


Other things also leave doubts. 
“I lived in France with the same 
pressure as Gascoigne.” he said 
when he arrived to Leeds. “Foot- 
ball is my life but I needed to live a 
normal existence outside the 
game.” He is moving into the most 
highly pressured environment in 
English football, which does not 
bodeweQ. 

The next few weeks should be a 
fascinating time for observers, but 
first Eric the Gaul has to get a 
plqoe in the- team. Ferguson win 
hbt decide on ' his' line-up until 
tomorrow, but it will be a surprise 
if Cantona starts toe game. One 
wonders how long he would accept 
that restricted role. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Newlove lifts Rovers 
into cup contention 


By Christopher Irvine 


PAUL Newlove is something 
of a novelty these days: a 
-second division player with a 
crowing international 
pedigree. 

Newlove’s pace in the 
.centre, instinct for being in the 
right place, and strength in 
>the tackle marks his quality 
.above that of most others in 
*the second division, a point 
lhai will not be lost on St 
‘Helens in tomorrow's Regal 
.Trophy second-round tie 
■ n gainst Featherstone Rovers. 

Newlove. winner of eight 
senior caps since becoming 
Great Britain’s youngest rep- 
resentative in 1989, stands 
.three tries short of a century in 
■all rugby league, a remarkable 
..feat for a player aged 2 1 . 

Newlove and Owen Simp- 
■son have scored 26 tries be- 
.•tween them this season. “I 
don’t feel I lose out. We strive 
-for a standard that would not 
be out of place in the first 
.division. We can spread it 
wide, or keep it tight within 
•the forwards,” Newlove said. 

Under toe innovative and 
'uncompromising eye of their 
.recent Australian appoint- 
ment. Steve Martin, toe for- 


mer North Sydney coach, 
Featherstone lead the second 
division, having lost only twice 
in 1 1 league matches. 

St Helens, deprived of the 
injured Jonathan Griffiths 
and the suspended Alan 
Hume, may lack the necessary 
indsiveness at half back and 
on toe wing to avoid a cup 
upset at Post Office Road. 
Much may hinge on toe 
driving runs of Kevin Ward, 
who starts a game for the 
Lancashire dub for toe first 
time in five weeks. 

Leigh could struggle to 
contain London Crusaders. 
Wigan have the simpler task 
at Hull Kingston Rovers, 
while Halifax may find Hull 
at home too convincing. 

This afternoon’s confronta- 
tion between Warrington and 
Bradford Northern is a rerun 
of toe 1991 final which toe 
Cheshire dub won 12-2. 
Bradford are likely to be 
without Deryck Fox, their 
scrum half. 

□ Neil Rudd, of Nottingham 
City, has been banned for ten 
matches for a high tackle on 
Andy Fletcher, the Barrow 
wing, last month. 


ATHLETICS 


Harder task for Oxford 


SIMON Baines attempts to 
retain toe University cross- 
•'countiy title today when he 
■"leads an Oxford University 
team which is unlikely to 
.dominate the men’s race on 
Wimbledon Common in the 
• way it did last year (David 
■ Powell writes). Last time. Ox- 
"ford finished six in the first 
-seven, but they have a young 
r team of eight today. 

‘ Baines has been in form, 
'finishing fourth in the Mike 
JSuily cross country at BristoL 
'’Oxford may need his victory to 
repeat last year's team tri- 
umph. “It is going to be doser 
; ; this year." said Richard Col- 
lier, of Oxford, who ran for the 


British junior squad at the 
world championships in Bos- 
ton last season. The experi- 
enced Cambridge team is 
stronger this year and indudes 
Michael Byers, a Canadian 
junior international 
This win be the I02nd 
match between the universi- 
ties. Oxford have 52 wins and 
Cambridge 49. The women 
compete for the seventeenth 
time. Cambridge have nine 
wins and Oxford seven. 

MBt Cambridge. I Hatawsa. C rtfcfeon, 
C Woodd 0 Bond. M Byes. D Naylor. K 
Johnson, □ dark, Oxford; M Bateson, S 
Baines, R Cotter, I McAfister. E Braoma, M 
wittier. J wood. J Nash. 

WOMEN: CamMtfw: E Coteman. C 
Fotiergi*. J Aften. H Monro, A NamanA J 
Benson. Oxford: J Hensiridga. N Haines, N 
Kafteon, M Myers, P Lopez, H MgnttMi 


TV man who tucks into all-round diet 


HIS hobby is bricklaying. If 
hehasacatchphrase.it would 
be something not very catchy, 
like “and look at that magnif- 
icent tuck!" Neither puppet 
nor stand-up impersonators 
ever lampoon him. David 
Vine has been anchoring and 
commentating at the BBC 
since 1966 and yet you can’t 
quite pin down his appeal 

His heavity-spectaded face 
and burly shoulders are part 
of the national furniture, his 
distinctively burred voice 
part of the soundtrack of 
Sunday afternoons in winter. 
Commuting between the fast- 
est and slowest athletic pur- 
suits known to man, stopping 
off in between at the smart- 
est he has done his bit to turn 
some sports still regarded as 
small in journalism into big 
ratings-pullers in television. 
So he must have something. 

Whatever it is. the BBC 
liked it from the start Two 
producers were scouring the 
country in search of someone 
to host the nascent BBC 2*s 
Sports Scene. They arrived in 
Plymouth, “toe last port of 
call”, says their eventual 
quarty. whom they found 
fronting and producing a 
sports programme for West- 
ward TV. the region’ 5 com- 
mercial station. Because 
BBC2 could not be received 
in the southwest be com- 
bined both jobs until a DaSty 


With Ski Sunday upon us once more, Jasper 
Rees examines what makes David Vine 
the solid prop of BBC sports’ programmes 


Mail critic rumbled the 
moonlighter; from then on. 
he came under Auntie's 
wing. 

“He has terrific profession- 
alism,” Jim Reside, executive 
producer ofSfa" Sunday, says. 
“In circumstances which 
most others would find un- 
tenable, be will still deliver an 
interview or a piece to camera 
or commentary. If we’ve only 
got time for one take. you’ll 
get what you want in one 
take. 

“He’s got a depth to his 
voice, like David Coleman 
and Alan Weekes and Hany 
Carpenter and aff the other 
great voices of sport the BBC 
has. he’s very articulate. 

“Skiing can be quite bor- 
ing. If toe winner comes from 
No. 1, David Vine has to told 
20 different ways of saying 
toe same tiling when toe 
other 19 come down.” 

There is a world of differ- 
ence between the green baize 
at the Guild Hall Preston, 
and the men's downhill at Val 
d’ls&re. fait Vine was comper- 
ing at toe one until late on 
Sunday night, and wiff be 
commentating at the other 


this weekend. Throw in the 
draw jumping the Olympic 
weightlifting and the Com- 
monwealth bowls and for his 
age — be was born in 1 935 — 
he qualifies as toe hardest 
working broadcaster at BBC 
Sport One winter he flew 3 1 
times in 13 weeks. 

In the 1970s. he was. if 
anything even more ubiqui- 
tous. There was scarcely an 
outside broadcast which 
didn't have Vine out in front 
of it — Superstars, Jeux Sans 



Frontages, die Eurovision 
Song Contest and Miss 
World, not to mention 
Grandstand, QuizbaU and A 
Question of Sport He could 
turn his hand to anything — 
“it’s the same sort of tech- 
nique whether you are talking 
about a skier coming down a 
mountain or a bit of 36-24-38 
walking down a platform.” is 
his distinctly non-pofiticaffy 
correct claim, though he bri- 
dles at the suggestion that 
one or two sports he commen- 
tates on are not necessarily 
areas of expertise. “I used to 
play bowls,” he says with a 
hint of pique, which, is more 
than can be said for his time 
on skis or in toe saddle. 

“How good is Harry Car- 
penter fighting Frank Bru- 
no?" is his stock rejoinder. “1 
have ridden, but very little. 1 
have skied, but I don’t rid. 
What’s the point? You could 


Vine: elderly fan base 


turn an ankle on the 
day.” 

perhaps his appeal has 
something to do with the 
sports with which he is asso- 
ciated. Huy are all safe: even 
■doing , though physically dan- 
gerous. is a gentlemanly 
sport There is ho bodily 
contact, fittie money-grub- 
bing and, depending on your 
view of what Cfive James 
once called the downhill ers‘ 
“multi-coloured condoms”. 


participants from all three 
sports are prcsentabty at- 
tired. Vine says he has a big 
fan base among the nation’s 
grandmothers. Perhaps they 
see in this safety-first non- 
skiera kindred spirit 

“People have got rather fed 
up with the aggro in sport” 
he says, and it is with them 
that be has found his niche. 
In the cause of right thinking 
and good manners, he can 
turn on the aggro himself. He 
once had the temerity to ask 
John McEnroe, who after his 
pits-of-the-worid explosion at 
Wimbledon only begrudging- 
ly agreed to a BBC interview, 
“What right do you have to 
call anyone an incompetent 
fool?” It was a blow for 
decency. McEnroe said he’d 
never talk to Vine again. 

In fact there is one man 
who hangs on David Vine’s 
every won! at the beginning 
of toe Ski Sunday series. “The 
head of the Austrian tourist 
board listens with bated 
"breath at Val d'isCre. If 1 say 
it’s good, he knows they are 
going to get a great season 
with skiers coming in from 
England. If I say it’s horrible, 
I can kfll his business. It’s a 
nice position to be in.” 

Almost as nice as being in 
toe Alps every weekend, 
where you will find him again 
this winter, pointing out that 
magnificent tuck. 


Snow blows away winning cheque for Kitt 


From David Powell 

in VAL D'lS&E 

A SNOWSTORM blew away 
£14.000 in hard-earned prize- 
money which AJ. Kitt de- 
served yesterday for his skill 
and courage. 

Kitt, a New Yorker. lost 
hold of the winner's cheque 
when the first World Cup 
downhill of the season was 
called off because only a 
quarter of the field had skied 
before the weather deteriorat- 
ed and the risk factor became 
too high. 

AH toe best downhiilers had 
gone, inducting the 15 seeds, 
so It was reasonable to assume 
that Kitt would have won. But. 


he was denied what would 
have been only his second 
World Cup win. his first 
having come here last year. 

Even before the first skiers 
had started, there were doubts 
over whether to sage the race 
after heavy overnight snow. 
But toe start was lowered, the 
course shortened, and the go- 
ahead given. Kin tirrued Imin 
52. 1 7sec ahead of toe World 
Cup downhill champion, 
Franz Heinzer, of Switzer- 
land, who took Imin 
52.4 5sec. 

Hardly had Kitt had time to 
say that he was "glad we 
competed — Val d’lsftre is 
known for missing races 
because the weather comes 


in” — than a halt was called. 
Officials had been right, he 
said, to start the competition. 
“The conditions were a little 
dangerous but that is OK,” 
Kitt said. “ Downhill is sup- 
posed to be dangerous." 

However, Kin had no com- 
plaints at the jury’s decision to 
cancel after only 22 of the 85 
competitors had skied. 

There is no firm rule gov- 
erning how many skiers must 
complete the course for a 
result to stand but, as a 
general principle, that will 
happen when the jury judges 
there are no skiers remaining 
who are likely to score World 
Cup points. 

His points and prize-money 


may be lost but at least Kitt, 
aged 24. had the chance to 
prove he is competitive after 
tearing ankle ligaments while 
playing basketball three 
weds ago. He is unable to 
walk comfortably but once 
inside his ski boot, the injury 
hardly notices. 

“I cannot run and I cannot 
. jump, but it does not hurt 
when 1 am skiing.” Kitt said. 

Because the starting point 
was lowered, top speeds were 
slower than the most daring 
downlufleis would like. But 
the need for caution was 
emphasised when Hansjorg 
Tauscher, of Germany, came 
perilously dose to crashing. 

Taking a right turn, his left 


ski brushed the safety netting: 
another inch off line and he 
may have been seriously hurt 
The race wifl not be re- 
scheduled for here, even 
though there are two days in 
the World Cup progamme to 
run* 

The super giant slalom is 
due to be hdd today and toe 
slalom tomorrow, it is pos- 
sible that Val d’lstoe’s lost 
downhill will be added to toe 
Garmisch-Partenkirchen pro- 
gramme eariy in January. 

1. a J kw (US). Into 
52JT7WC; Z F Heinzer CSwKO, i -53 4S: 3. J 
Wort. ISm 4 . D Mafrer 
ISgB; k M Grade* (Lrt. 


The Khans : 
eliminate : 
the Britons : '> 

Jahangir Khan, the defending 
champion, will face Jansher 
Khan, the world champion, in 
the final of the Pakistan 
squash tournament, after 
sweeping aside their British 
opponents in Karachi yester- ' 
day. 

Jahangir scored a straight 
games victory over Simon 
Parke 15-8, 15-7, 15-10. but 
Jansher surprisingly dropped 
the first game before demol- 
ishing Peter Marshall 12-15, 
15-12,15-6,15-5. 

Upwardly mobfle * 

Ice Skating: Powerful free 
dancing lifted the British tide 
holders, Lisa and John Dunn, 
three places to a sixth positioA 
in the world junior champion 1 
ships in Seoul won by the 
Russians, Svirina and 
Sakhrravslty. yesterday. They 
were thirteenth last year. 

Jones's despair 

Rugby league: Mark Jones 
the Hull prop, yesterday lost 
all hope of playing for Wales 
against France in Perpignan 
tomorrow week when a disci- 
plinary committee in Leeds 
rejected his appeal against a « 
six-match ban. * 

Boone advances : 

Rackets: Willie Boone, th4 
No. 2 seed, reached the semi- 
finals of the Lacoste British 
amateur championship with 4 
victory by 15-2, 15-0. 15-10 
against Guy Barter. 

Frankfurt again . 

Tennis: The international fed- 
eration confirmed in London 
yesterday that the- 1994 Fedep 
ation Cup will be played fa 
Frankfurt for the third consec^ 
utiveyear. 

Treasurer leaves 4 

Rugby union; Glamshc Grif- 
fiths has resigned as treasurer 
of the Welsh RU.-dairmng 9 
that he had been placed in “an - 
intolerable position in so fa?*? 
being able to effectively exe- 
cute my duties ana 
responsibilities”. 





I . 


. 


\ 


\ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 


SPORT 31 


FA official heavily criticised 


Kelly defends his 
court statements 
supporting Blissett 






GRAHAM Kelly had no re- 
grets yesterday about the pan 
he played in Gaiy Blissett’s 
acquittal from a charge of 
causing grievous bodily harm 
to a fellow professional. On 
Thursday’. Blissett a Brent- 
ford striker, was cleared of 
“cynically and deliberately” 
thrusting his elbow into die 
face of John Uzzdl. of Torquay 
United, in a third division 
game last December. 

Kelly, the chief executive of 
the Football Association, had 
told Salisbury Crown Court 
that Blissett had been involved 
in an “ordinary aerial 
challenge" 1 . 

It brought an angry re- 
sponse from officials at Tor- 
quay, with whom Uzzell has 
been unable to resume a 
playing career almost certainly 
ended by the incident. Mike 
Bateson, the Torquay chair- 
man, said: “Kelly’s remarks 
that he could watch four 
games a week and see 200 
such tackles was the most 
ludicrous statement I have 
ever heard. It is almost an 
encouragement to players to 
behave recklessly. 

“Kelly has given the impres- 
sion that football is the equiva- 
lent of a bar-room brawl. But 
dubs like ours spend an 
enormous amount of time, 
effort and money trying to 
attract the genial public. 


By Louise Taylor 

Kelly has brought the game 
into disrepute." 

The FA. however, will 
probably ignore any com- 
plaints officially levelled at is 
chief executive on the basis 
that someone cannot be 
charged for answers given 
when questioned under oath. 

Kelly said yesterday: “I have 
no regrets and have had no 
second thoughts about my role 
in the court case. It would have 
been simple for me to take the 
easy way out and not become 
involved but I did not do that 
I believe I did the right thing 
and I feel very sorry for Gary 
Blissett that this had to come 
to court 

“! could have said that 
because of my posiiton with 
the FA this was too delicate an 
issue to become involved with, 
and that it was not a good idea 
for me to be put on the spot 
and possibly take the opposite 
stance from a referee in court 
But 1 did not because I 
believed that I should do the 
right thing.” 

Arthur Smith, the match 
referee, who sent Blissett off, 
declined to comment. But 
Lester Shapter, formerly a 
leading referee from Torquay, 
said that Kelly had under- 
mined referees' authority. 

“1 am absolutely gutted. not 
only for John Uzzdl but for 
football,” Shapter said “Mr 


Kelly had an ideal opportunity 
to help rid professional foot- 
ball in this country of one of 
the biggest IDs in the game 
today — the elbow in the face. 
He did not take it 

“As a result of all this, 
referees will have lost the 
credibility they deserve. Hav- 
ing heard the verdict and 
KeDy’s evidence, players win 
think that it’s quite legal to go 
and challenge for the baH in 
the way Bliseett did It is 
surprising, because in 1987, 
when I was president of the 
Football League Referees and 
linesmen's Association, the 
theme of my speech to our 
conference in Torquay was 
The Arm and the Law*. 
Graham KeQy spoke on the 
subject and condemned the 
illegal use of the elbow.” 

Another contradiction was 
noted by Peter Willis, a spokes- 
man for the Referees’ Associ- 
ation. “I would refer 
everybody to the fact that die 
FA did find that, under the 
laws of the game, the player 
concerned did commit an 
offence because, after its own 
enquiry, the FA subsequently 
suspended him for three 
games.” he said. 

Meanwhile. Blissett, who 
has been supported by Brent- 
ford. leads their attack in a 
first division match at 
Birmingham City today. 



Bright future: O'Neill is looking forward to a place in the Football League 


I XZ Atkins plans fresh Fife avoids O’Neill sure of his real goal 


Cambridge style 


By Louise Taylor 


* j 
i ‘ 


i he 

;i Ki-.' 


IAN Atkins was yesterday 
appointed the new manager of 
Cambridge United. Aged 35, 
Atkins played for Shrewsbury 
Town, Sunderland, Everton, 
Ipswich Town and Bir- 
mingham City- He also man- 
aged Colchester United in 
their GM Vauxhall Confer- 
ence days and was. until 
Thursday. No. 2 to Terry Coo- 
per at Birmingham. 

He will be in charge of 
Cambridge for the first time 
today when United are at 
home to Wolverhampton 
Wanderers in a first division 
fixture. Atkins’s brief is to keep 
Cambridge in that division 
but he does not intend to 
emulate the direct football 
which brought notoriety to 
John Beck, his predecessor. 

"The long ball was success- 
ful for John, "Atkins said. “But 
it is not my cup of tea. I will be 
working on passing in train- 
ing but to change things too 
drastically would be 
disastrous." 

Atkins has registered as a 
player, but has not named 
himself in today’s squad. His 
appointment ’’shattered*’ 
Gary Johnson, who had acted 
as caretaker following Beck’s 
dismissal six weeks ago and 
led the team to a Coca-Cola 
Cup win against Premier 
League Oldham Athletic on 
Tuesday night. 

Although Johnson, said that 


he felt “badly let down” Atkins 
hoped mat “Gary would stay 
on at the chib”. Johnson will 
decide over the weekend. 

Reg Smart, the Cambridge 
chairman, said that while 
Johnson had done “a good 
job”, Atkins's additional expe- 
rience gave him the edge. 
Smart hopes that Atkins — 
articulate, personable and a 
devotee of sophisticated foot- 
ball —will repair the damage 
done to the dub’s image by 
Bede 

Trevor Francis, the Shef- 
field Wednesday manager, 
said that, within tbe past 
fortnight, he had turned down 
offers totalling £6.5 million for 
two of his players — David 
Hirst and Chris Waddle — 
from Manchester United and 
Toulon respect: vdy. 

Malcolm Crosby's position 
as Sunderland manager looks 
less secure than ever after an 
argument with Bob Murray, 
the chairman. 

Crystal Palace have pulled 
out of a £150.000 deal to sign 
the Yugoslav international de- 
fender. Vujadin Stanoikovic. 
He has returned home after a 
week on trial with Palace. A 
fee was agreed with Partizan 
Belgrade last month, but the 
Palace manager, Steve 
COppeli, said: "It was asking a 
lot for a Yugoslavian to come 
in and do the business in our 
position.” 


foreign 
player issue 

Zurich: Fife, football's world 
governing body, yesterday 
sidestepped calls fora lifting of 
restrictions on the number of 
foreign players in European 
leagues. But Fifa will set up a 
working group to look more 
dosely at the issue. 

• There have been calls to end 
tiie Italian situation, where 
highly-paid players are sitting 
out matches in the stands. But 
Sepp Blatter, the Fife general 
secretary, said: “We dedded 
that this was a matter for the 
national associations and we 
would not interfere in it” 

Fifa dedded to allow video 
and television evidence to be 
used in disciplinary hearings 
and appeals. 

Fife also rejected a plea by 
Milan Panic, the prime minis- 
ter of Yugoslavia, for a ban on 
Yugoslavia's participation in 
the qualifying competition of 
the World Cup to be lifted. 
Blatter said: “We have unfor- 
tunately to abide by the United 
Nations sanctions on Yugosla- 
via and have reluctantly to 
turn down this request." 


By Walter Gammie 

WYCOMBE Wanderers and 
Martin O’Neill, their manag- 
er, make no secret of the fact 
that they are ready to move 
on to higher things. For once, 
there is nothing hollow about 
such claims. After selling 
Loakes Park, with its sloping 
pitch and memories of heroic 
cup battles. Wycombe have 
become, in their third season 
at their model ground, Ad- 
ams Park, the leading dub in 
non-Leagoe football 

That is why O'Neill, a 
voluble Irish mix of discon- 
certing confidence and self- 
deprecating whimsy, is 
unapologetic when he says 
the glamour tie of the FA Cup 
second round, that between 
Wycombe and West 
Bromwich Albion tomorrow, 
counts for comparatively 
little. 

“Unlike most non-League 
dubs who are absolutely des- 
perate for an FA Cup run to 
keep the dub alive, for us it’s 
no more than a fantastic 
diversion from trying to get 
out of the Vauxhall Confer- 
ence,” O’Neill said. 

“We welcome the exposure 



FA CUP 


and the boys will take the 
ephemeral glory if they can. 
That, aside, if we reach tbe 
fifth round or quarter-finals 
or whatever and lose out on 
the Vauxhall Conference. I’m 
afraid I’d commit suicide.” 
Wycombe are 13 points dear 
at the top of the Conference. 

O’Neill is ambitious. “I 
want to be up there with the 
Dalglishes and Sounesses.” 
be said. “I played against 
them and I'd like to be up 
there managing a big team. 
In a couple of seasons I hope 
I will be and I know I’d relish 
it It’s not sounding big 
headed. I hope.” 

Eight of the 13 players who 
helped Wycombe to an im- 
portant win at Altrincham 
last Saturday, were at the 
dub when O’Neill took over. 
He has kept a settled side 
and instilled confidence. 
“There are umpteen ways to 
play this game if you stay 
within the rules, and who is 


to say what is right or wrong 
1 used to be a dribbler with 
the ball and I like players 
taking people on in certain 
areas of the pitch. I like to 
give players a chance to 
express themselves.” 

Steve Guppy and Dave 
Carroll tease defences down 
the flanks and typical of 
O’Neill’s work has been the 
transformation of Simon 
Stapleton, a midfield player. 

“He used to break dear 
and miss goals galore,” 
O’NeiQ said. "I didn’t have to 
look and see who it was when 
the ball used to go flying into 
the stand and the crowd 
roared. I knew it was him. 

“I told him not to panic, 
just think as if he was going 
to score. I said to farm if he 
scored 12 goals this season, 
he’d be worth £500.000. Now 
I've had to play him at left 
back because he's already 
scored seven and there’s five 
months of the season left” 

O'Neill's self-belief is dear- 
ly infectious and when he 
says he will send his team out 
to “enjoy themselves” 
against Ossie Ardiles's 
footballing side, you know 
that they will do just that 




Todtty 

Coventry vl; 


Liverpool defeat stands 


LIVERPOOL’S hopes of a 
European Cup Winners’ Cup 
reprieve were dashed yester- 
day by Fifa. the world's gov- 
erning body, which dedded 
that the registration of 
Mikhail Rusayev, xhe Spartak 
M a scow player at the centre of 
the eligibility dispute, should 
be accepted “even though no 
transfer certificate was 
issued.” 

Rusayev appeared in the 
first two rounds of the compe- 
tition. including the 6-2 aggre- 
gate win over Liverpool, 
without international 
clearance. 

He was transferred from the 
German dub, Oldenburg, 
during the summer and the 
Russian federation did not 


receive a clearance certificate 
before allowing him to play. 
Although Uefa admitted that 
the Russians were guilty of a 
“dear violation” of Fifa rules, 
they were bound by Fifa’s 
decision. Spartak play 
Feyenoord in the quarter- 
finals. 

Peter Robinson. Liverpool s 
chief executive, said that his 
dub would consider an appeal 
and the directors would have 
discussions over the weekend. 
**We are somewhat surprised 
at the decision as the player 
was evidently not registered in 
accordance with the rulesand 
regulations.” he said. “This 
might possibly have serious 
implications for any breaches 
of tiie rules in the future” 


Cownuy are unchanged but could 
name McGrath as a substitute, five 
vweeks after keyhole surgery on his 
knee- Ipswich, with a siring of draws but 

S two Premier League defeats to 
name, are without Palmer and 
WiSams In the midfield 

Crystal Palace vSheff Utd 

Ndah and Bowry. promoted Iran 
the youth team, keep their places in a 
Palace side looking to record its 
first Premier League wm at Setwret 
Park erd only 9s second of a 
cisapponting season. Dave Bassett, 
the United manager, was fleetlngly 
In charge of Palace before the arrfcst of 
Steve CoppeM, who concedes mat, 
with Palace second bottom, his position 
is precarious. Pemberton, 
previously of Paisce. plays m central 
defence for United because P 

is Ir 


is in the 


Leeds vNotfm Forest 

Brian Clough, bnefy manager ^ 

Leeds during the 1970s. could do with 
his Forest side anting UnitecTs 31- 
match unbeaten league iun attend 

Road Lee Chapman, the Leeds 

centre forward, who previously played 
for Forest. wiU have different ideas 

on his 33rd birthday, wabb irturns to 
the Fores mBfleld n pteca ot Black 
but Leeds must deck* whether to 
* on Batty's fitness or retain 

Je In thetre. Forest are buoyed by 

the midweek Coca-Cola win 


against Tottenham but badly need 
points to escape from the bottom of the 
labia 

Middlesbrough v Blackburn 
Stuart Ripley, the winger who joined 
Rovers trom MUdtesbtcugh for £1 3 
mfSon the simmer, retuns to hte 
home town and the dub vrfiere he was 
for so long a lavouita Alter a bright 
start Middlesbrough have won only one 
of their past ten games and are 
handteapped by the absence of 
Kemaghan. Philips, Morris and 
Falconer [ai injured), hflgnea makes hts 
home debid lor MWdtesorough 
white Shearer has overcome an ankle 
Injury in time to lead the Blackburn 
attack. 

QPRv Oldham 
Aready without HaJhmrth, their 
first-choice goalkeeper, for the 
remainder ot the season. Oldham 
have a doubt about Keetey. his deputy. 
Should Keetey lad a fitness test 
Garrard, 19. will make Ks debut 
Pointon and Olney are doubtful and 
Marshal and McDonald ruled out. so 
Bartow raid start tor an 
inconsistent Oldham. 

Norwich v Wimbledon 
League leaders they may be but 
Norwich should beware because 
although VWmbtedon — whqput 
their defence up fa sale on Thursday In 
an attempt to raise £2 m®on — 
have recorded only three Premier 
League wmslhs season they have 
as been at ihe expense ol leading sides 
— Arsenal, Manchester United and 
Liverpool. Norwich, who are ftqMfiied 
to dispense wtth the sweeper 
system they adopted so successfuly at 


Aston Vila last week, have beaten 
Wimbledon only once m 14 meetings. 
Wimbledon, who have scored only 
once in their past three League games, 
are handicapped by the continued 
absence ot Fashanu and uncertainty 
over the fitness of Segera. Scales 
and Jones. Joe Kimear. the Wimbledon 
manager, begins a five-match 
louettne ban 

Sheff Wed v Aston VQla 

Ron Atkinson ctn expect a hot 
reception on his return to the club he 
waited out on to join VBa almostl 8 
months ago Aiksison has fitness 
doubts about Parker and Houghton 
in Ns mldfietd and is again without 
Teate, the player he refers to as 
“my John Wayne", to centra] defence. 
Barrett Is Boaly to deputise against 
Wednesday's in-form striking 
partnership of Hirst and BriyiL 
TtevwtD be aiming to outdo Vila's duo 
of Dafan Atfatson and Saunders. 

Spink, the ViBa goalkeeper, wS have a 
late fitness test so Bosmch stands 
by aid Oakes. 18, has been recalled 
from a loan sped at Gloucester City 
to case he is required on the bench. 
Palmer and Wilson are doubtful for 
Wednesday 

Southampton v Arsenal 

Perry Groves became George 
Graham's first slgrang as Arsenal 
manager when he paid Coichesier 
United £75,000 tor ho services more 
than six years ago. This summer 
Graham sold Graves on to 
Southampton fa £750,000 and the 
winger begins on the bench against Ns 
tamer clufi today. Southampton 
are unchanged lor the fifth wne and 
looking fa a fifth successive game 


without defeat Arsenal have lost 
their past two to the League. White 
Graham has reservations about 
Ltoipar, Ns winger, so Ian Branfoot, the 
Southampton marker, is not 
always overjoyed with Ns wide man, Le 
Ttssfer. Qhar could win the match 
though 

Tottenham v Chelsea 

How wil Chelsea — who have won 
seven ot thor pea tan matches — cope 
without the suspended Mck 
Harford in friar attack? To t tenham, 
whose defence win be happy about 
the absence of a forwad who has 
scored ten goals to the past ten 
games, are without Allen, Dune, Gray. 
Sedgtey and Howete. Watson and 
Barmby are expected to start and 
Campbell, 18 and a graduate from 
the FA’s national school at Uleshall Is 
in the squad lor the first time. 

Forced to make their Trst change to 
personnel fa seven games, 

Chaises are Mealy to ntroduce Le Saux 
fa the first timet 


Tomorrow 

Man Utd v Man City 

Will Cantona, signed from Leeds 
last week, start toe 117th Manchester 
cferby on the pitch or the bench tor 
United? Alex Foguson, the United 
manager, who has injury worries 
about Robson. Ince end Sharpe. wHJ 
decide shorty before kick-ott but 
the Indications are that Catena will 
, i on the bench, with Hughes 
I McCtalr twinned in attack. Ian 
Bnghtwell, of Coy, w* have a late 
fitness lest 

□ Compflad by Louisa Taylor 



AMERICAN FOOTBALL 

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.5***ts 89. Utah jasst HO. mumsm? 
J>'to«wcivcsBt.Seanfe$upn'ScnQi25. 
Oitiujb MawwScs 100: Lee AngHot Ckppere 
122 OfljncU Mage KH 


BOWLS 

CQATBfexEE: ctS tosuanea Seattith 
"Waers. Sen- thuds: J Pncc (WMb 9) » A 
Ate** (Eng), 7-0. 7-4. G Robertson (Sea) 


w A Thomsen. {&«)._ 7-6. 7-4. Final: 
ffcbgrteonKPnce.S-'.' 


. 7-6. 7-4. 7-2. 


BOXING 


LEWISHAM. ^. : - . a 
Serf; (Scutoampion) M 

M Pano {Wbtoahamplonl. rw 5th 
Bantam: Brwtoy Store (Gannto fl Tormjkp 
Norman Dan* 

m Mbori MusankDtxXB pambfflj.isc am. 
Sro^mXJkSe: Mark Baker « 

Apron Wnghl (WoUmhamptort). f#c isr 
ROTTERDAM: European supeHetoher- 
tw (Hofi) 

bi JacOQto TDma (Fr). f*s. 

ffr JBW DE LUZ. France WBCJflht- 


CYCLING 


ZURICH: Sto-day race Jaffa tour i 
!■ A I 


fvcoiono Oti, 333pte. 2. B Fta and K 
and P PBtors (Ho«. 266: 4. E dfl WtWe (Bell 


and J vwgarby (Den], 183: 5. three laps 
behind. K KhraMsov and M Ganeyev 
fRuSS),244 

CRICKET 

SHEFFIELD SHIELD: Matbouma: Wesson 
AusnaiQ 113-2 v Vidor*. 

FOOTBALL 

FA Cup 

First round replay 

PETE8B0R0 (0) 1 KWGSTWflAN (0) 0 
on Thursday 

FA VASE: Second round: Hungerfad 0. 
WBneyl _ _ , „ 

PONTINS CENTRAL LEAGUE: Hrat * 
vtsion: iWpod 4. Manchester Gty 1; 
Manchester Uriiod ft Sheffield WSdnasday 
2 Fosrponad: Aston Villa v Newcastle 
SeconadMsk>n: Oldham 2. BackpOtf 0 
Postponed: rtd v Wigan 
FRENCH LEAGUE: Lyons 1. Ament 1 


GOLF 


NlSMNOMtYA. Japan: Man’s tour- 
nament Second round: 137: N Qzski 


). 67. 70. 140: D IshS [USl, 68. 7Z 
142: T M Chan (Taiwan). 72. TO; T C Chen 
(Taiwan), 72. 70; T Mfetanabe (Japan). 69. 
73 143: KMuna (Japan). 72. 71. H mow 
(Japan). 72. 71; T Hamfflon (US). 70. 73 
14k N Yliwra (Japan). 74. 71 146: T 
NNffllim (Japan), 71.75 

TARPON SPRINGS. Honda Mbesd team 
event Fka maid las US). 62: H Stacy and 
JHaas. 63: LRnksr-Graham and L R«k£i 
ok D Mochna and O Foreman. B 


Schufe. tsf: E DaM and O Love N. A Bare: 
and J Lkiston, O Massey and M McCumber: 
R Jones and G Hastens: C Johnson and M 
Camevale; V Fagon and B Faber. A Meat 
and D Waldorf; PBotfey and B Gtesson. 
SB: J I Dckmon and J Detsng. L Waters 
md G Koch, D CofrJonas and O Han, T 
Kard^r and B Rasher, B Breton and & 
MayfiB. c Ha end J Dart, S Ham&n and E 
Dajghwy. S Setohauer and K Pony. D 
Lofted and M Smeh, A Rrtzman and J 
F Deacampe arid B Twey. K 
and B Andrade. C Kagg. are! r 
F ehr. S uae and FAiem. T Green anqp 
Hammond, N Scranton and K Knox, j 
Gedde* and j Ttepe. M MaOon anas 
Paie. K Nobia aid A Bean British score. 
70: PWdgW (GB) ato B Bryan: (US) 

J^LKAMAOUl: Tunisian sartors chsmp- 
fanhip: Second round (Engrad unless 


stated). 143: B Carter, 74, 68. 143; T 
Horton. 73. 70. 145: J Hamifen ($EM). 74. 
7j. 143: D Butler. 76, 69; H Bamerman 
(Sea). 73. 73. 147! B Huggw (Wales). 70. 
77: DTatwt. 75. 72: TCovWtey fire). 71, 76 
14& H MuscrOfl 76. 72; T Squras. 70,78. 
149: W Lege 75. 74; A Stem (ta). 73. 78 

ICE HOCKEY ~ 

NATIONAL LEAGUE (W-flJ: Boston Bruns 
4. Montreal Canaiers 3; Minnesota North 
Stare 4. Detroit Red Wings 2. New ■* — 
Devris 3, Ottawa Senators 3 (OT). Pf 
ohia Flyers 3. Quebec Noniques 2 
Cheapo Stadtoauto 4, Toronto k._, — 
iwSe > Los Angeles Kims 5. Pittsburgh 
Penguins 3; Hartford Whalers 7. San Jo» 
Sites 5. Vaicouver Canucks 4. Edmonton 

oaeret 

ICE SKATING ~ 

AFOUL; world Junior championships: 
MGKlTEPlxAaiLMli 1 5.2. MwfefesQjij. 
55. x I KuBt muss). 55 Ice dance: i, E 
Svvma and S SaHmovsto (R^a). 2A a S 
Nowak and S Kofasnsta (PqO. 3.8: 3. B Nau 
andLMone9«fFri.54 Brlteh pfetea 6. 
L Dim and J Dural, 14JE Irate I 
Korshunova and D Saratov (Buss), 25; 2. 
M Peuova end ASkteufidze (Russ). 24; 3, 


I Coutombe and B MarcoOe (Can}. 4ft. 

RACKETS 


QUEEN'S CLUB, London Lacoete British 
smataur 
Male 

Hue WBIams 

15-1 1;J Pram btSDavies.8-15, 166. 15-4. 
15-£, WBocne bt G Barker. 1fr2. 160.15- 
10 


tnavununaon: LBcoewrantsn 
teur championship: Quarterfinals: J 
bt J Spuillng. 15-10, 15-4, 18-14; M 
WBSams bt T Cockrott. 16-11. 15-10, 


SNOOKER 


DONCASTER: Ccrafite World 
championship: Fntrcmd: S Done 
teadsARobUoux (Cam, 6* m dark 
loads w Bond Eng), 5-3. 


SQUASH 


KARACHI: Pakistan Open cha m ptonalito: 
SamkfinalK Jshangr Khan (PbM bt s 
Parke JOB), 15-3. 16-7. 15-10, Jans her 
Khan (Pan) bi P Marshal p5B). 12-15. 15- 
12, 1S6. 15-5 


TENNIS 


PERTH, Atmrefec ATP men's 

tournament: Quaner-finete S Total 

bl C Baitey (GB), 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. 


TENNIS 


Strong prepare to 
wilt in the heat 
of the Davis Cup 

Fjrom Simon Bajuves in fort worth, texas 


THE Davis Cup is the ulti- 
mate test of bottle, somebody 
once said to me. I was inclined 
to pooh-pooh this at the time, 
but now. with the final begun 
and tiie United Stales bizarre- 
ly taking on Switzerland, I am 
forced to rethink. Mental 
strength is the key to most 
sporting events, but this 
counts double in the Davis 
Cup. 

Most Brits do not have a 
dear idea about the Davis 
Cup. for the very good reason 
that Britain has not been a 
force in it for years. But up at 
the sharp end. this competi- 
tion is a matter of numbing 
intensity, and it cannot fail to 
inspire a momentous reaction. 
Whether that reaction is fight 
or flight is something that 
rather depends on the nature 
of the player involved. 

“Sure, we should win easily 
on paper,” Andre Agassi said. 
“But this is the Davis Cup.” 
The United States went into 
the final with nothing less 
than the Dream Team of 
tennis. If the opposition seeks 
hope, it can look only to its 
own worthy qualities, and to 
the imponderable nature of 
this extraordinary tourna- 
ment “In Davis Cup, it’s how 
much you want it Not how 
well you are playing ” Agassi 
said. 

The United States have 
Agassi. Jim Courier. Pete 
Sampras and John McEnroe. 
The Swiss have Marc Rosset 
(he did win the the Olympic 
tournament, but that is as fine 
a way of rising with out trace as 
tennis can offer) and Jakob 
Hlasek. who is a naturalised 
Czechoslovak. ‘‘Davis Cup is 
nothing about the record, or 
the rankings on the comput- 
er.” Hlasek said. “We never 
thought we would be here — 
what have we to lose?” He was 
asked what he thought of this 
cowboy-conscious town: “As a 
boy, when I watched West- 
erns, I was always on the side 
of the Indians.” 

The question that remains is 
whether the imponderables of 
the Davis Cup will transform 
this final into the battle of the 
little Big Horn. It comes 
down to responsibility. Nor- 
mally, a tennis player is re- 
sponsible to nobody but 
himself. This is what makes 
tennis players rather singular 
characters. But in the Davis 
Cup they must shed their 
singularity and explore other 
aspects of their personalities. 

There are team games and 
individual games: there are 
athletes who prefer the de- 
lights of shared effort and 
those who prefer the loneliness 
of solo competition. There are 
team misfits who say they 
should have been golfers, and 
there are individual players 


who, at the critical moment, 
lade the nerve to pull ahead of 
the pack and win the big one. 

But some of these individual 
sports hold team competitions. 
Suddenly, the lone athlete is 
responsible not for himself or 
hendt but for the team — for 
the nation, if you prefer. This 
happens in tiie Ryder Cup: 
some golfers blossom under its 
stresses, others shriveL Faldo 
is never the same force in team 
competition: Ballesteros seems 
incapable of losing. 

In three-day eventing, the 
same stresses affect the riders. 
The British team went to 
pieces at the last Olympic 
Games, throwing away tiie 
medal chances in a fit of 
timidity. 

And in the Davis Cup, the 
pressures, the responsibilities 
— always a novelty for the lone 
athlete — can be utterly de- 
structive. Sampras spoke of 
the last time he played a Davis 
Cup final: “It was probably the 
most devastating two losses I 
have ever had. It was my first 
time in Davis Cup. It was 
awful out there. I hope it never 
happens again.” 

That was last year, when the 
United States played France. 
Sampras lost both his singles 
matches, to Henri Leconte 
and Guy Forget France’s 
victory was wildly improbable, 
to say the least A Swiss victory 
would require another serving 
of that same lethal cocktail of 
terror and inspiration. 

“i*ve seen people rise way 
above their capabilities.” 
Agassi said. “And I've seen my 
capabilities lowered 
considerably.” 

Agassi can say this with 
some confidence. He is re- 
nowned — at least he was pre- 
Wimbledon — for the fragility 
of his temperament But in 
Davis Cup tennis, before this 
final began, he has won 18 
singles and lost only four. 
Sampras, with three wins and 
three defeats in singles, has 
been relegated to the doubles, 
which take place today. He 
has the support of the redoubt- 
able McEnroe who. with 41 
wins and eight defeats in 
singles, and 17 wins and two 
defeats in doubles, is one of the 
finest Davis Cup players in 
history. 

"Davis Cup can do that to 
you,” Sampras said after his 
humiliation last year. “I didn't 
know what to expect, and it 
was a pretty awful experience. 
But thus is my fifth time. I’m 
more or less used to the whole 
experience, so I think I’ll do 
OK.” 

Today, Sampras will learn 
whether "I think" is good 
enough. As for the Swiss, they 
continue to I earn whether “I 
hope" is enough when you 
play the Dream Team. 


EQUESTRIANISM 

Pessoa wins speed 
dass once more 

From Jenny MacArthur in Bordeaux 


RODRIGO Pessoa of Brazil, 
aged 20. won the opening 
speed class for the second 
successive year at the World 
Cup show here yesterday. 

Last year, riding the same 
horse. Loro Piana Colonel, he 
won by just under two sec- 
onds. Yesterday the Brazilian’s 
precocious talent helped him 
finish 2.22 seconds ahead of 
the runner-up, Philippe Render 
of France, on Waiti Satomi. 
On both occasions Pessoa was 
the youngest in the dass. 

Robert Smith, of Britain, 
took the early lead in he 63- 
strong dass after a superb 
round on Susan Bond’s 12- 
year-old mare, Lurilla. But 
Razier. followed by his compa- 
triot, Edouard Couperie cm 
Quartzy II, and the Belgian, 
Eric Wauteis, on Waiti Isaura. 
recorded faster times to push 
Smith down to fifth place. 


Pessoa, who wiD ride his top 
horse. Special Envoy, in the 
World Cup qualifier tomor- 
row, did not know what time 
he had to beat when he 
entered the arena. “I just went 
as fast as I could,” he said. 

Horse and rider have been 
bred to showjump. Pessoa’s 
father. Nelson, is Brazil's most 
experienced show jumper with 
52 Nations Cup performances 
to bis credit Rodrigo first 
competed internationally at 
Hickstead when aged nine. 

Loro Piana Colonel is an 
eight-year-old stallion by the 
top Dutch jumping stallion, 
Nimmerdor. Pessoa, based 
with his father in Belgium, 
bought the stallion from Ar- 
gentina last May. 

RESULTS: Prtx Office Du Tourisms: i. 
Lens Plane Cokxto (R Pessoa. Br). 0 tauts, 
35. 81 sac; 2 Watt Satomi (P Roztor. frTo. 
33-03. 3. Quaitty 3 (E Couperie, fir ft 
3821. 


YACHTING 


Straggler rounds Horn 


Cape Hone Peter Phillips and 
his crew on Rhone-Poulenc, 
the last of the British Steel 
Challenge yachts, at last raised 
a toast to Cape Horn yester- 
day, after being delajred by 
repairs (Barry Pickthall 
writes). 

Dubbed “Yawning Cape 
Horn" by other teams who 
were becalmed here earlier 
this week, conditions yesterday 
were perfect as Rhone-Pou- 
lenc rounded in bright sun- 
shine shortly after 1G00 
GMT. “It’s a big achievement 
to get to the Horn and we are 
pleased to have made it,” 
Phillips said as his yacht cut 

*1 

/ 


through the southern ocean 
swell in a welter of spray at 
better than nine knots. 

Although Rhone-Poulenc is 
five days and 800 miles be- 
hind Nuclear Electric, the 
leading yacht, on this second, 
Rio to Hobart stage of the 
race around the world, Phil- 
lips said his crew was not 
downhearted. 

POSITIONS (a 1500 GMT yesterday wih 
mtes to Hobart- i, Nuctear Becfrfc u 
awfendwj).4ft*;a. Commeioal Unfai ft 

''JMipltal, 

9, 4,780; 


7, Pride ofTeesade (I 




s 

& 






32 

GOLF 27 

FALDO IN HIGH 
DUDGEON IN 
SOUTH AFRICA 


SPORT 

SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


RACING 28 

AGA KHAN LOSES 
HIS APPEAL 
OVER ALIYSA ■& 


t 

ft 

» 

ill 


.12 


11 7th Manchester deity may start without United’s new £1 .2m signing 

Ferguson undecided over Cantona 


By Louise Taylor 

Will he play or won’t he? 
Even Alex Ferguson is not 
sure whether to indude Eric 
Cantona horn the start of the 
1 1 7th Manchester derby at 
Old Trafford tomorrow or seat 
him on the substitutes' bench. 
The Manchester United man- 
ager. who signed Cantona 
hum Leeds United for £1.2 
million last week, said yester- 
day: “l think 1 have made up 
my mind what to do about 
Cantona but I'll keep tossing it 
over in my mind until 
Sunday." 

Provided Ferguson sticks to 
plan A. it is expected that 
Mark Hughes and Brian 
McClair will be in attacking 
tandem, with Cantona on the 
sidelines. If that frustrates the 
red segments of Old Trafford 
it will not stand in the way of 
some raucous celebrations 
should United beat City. 

This morning. United stand 
sixth in the Premier League, 
nine points adrift of Norwich 
City, the leaders, while Peter 
Reid’s Manchester City are 
eighth, two points further 
back. 

Ferguson, though, is plan- 
ning to take over at the top. 
"We are not out of the champ- 
ionship race tty any means,” 
he said. “Only Norwich have 
maintained any degree of 
consistency while the other 
sides, like ourselves, have all 
had their ups and downs.” 

Ferguson was angry at re- 
vived reports that Biyan Rob- 
son. his captain, was poised to 
become manager of Sunder- 
land. He dismissed them as 
“rubbish”. Ferguson said that 
rather than returning to his 
native North-East, where he 
was brought up as a Newcastle 
United supporter. Robson, 
who has started just four 
matches this season, would be 
remaining at Old Trafford to 
lead United’s latest title chall- 
enge. 

The former England cap- 
tain is now 35. his contract 
runs out at die end of the 
season and he remains prone 
to injuries, but, like Ferguson, 
he is still committed to win- 
ning a championship that has 
eluded his dub for 26 years. 

A late fitness test permitting, 
Robson hopes to start in front 
of the television cameras to- 
morrow. and Ferguson said: 
“1 have waited a long time to 
get Biyan Robson and Lee 
Sharpe back in die side and 
they make a hdl of a differ- 
ence. They are a very valuable 
duo to us. Many teams have 
key areas and they are part of 
ours. Bryan controls the shape 
of the side and he has so much 



Splendid isolation: Blake, the Kingstonian goalkeeper who was struck by a coin in the last match, stands alone against Peterborough yesterday 



PW 

0 

L 

F 

APIS 

Nanvich 

1711 

3 

3 

32 

30 

36 

Btacttxxn 

17 

8 

7 

2 

S 

12 

31 

Arsenal 

17 

9 

2 

8 

22 

17 

29 

Aston VNa 

17 

7 

7 

3 

26 

18 

28 

Chaises 

17 

6 

4 

5 

24 

19 

28 

ManUtd 

17 

7 

6 

4 

18 

12 

73 

OPR 

17 

7 

5 

5 

22 

17 

28 

Man City 

17 

7 

4 

6 

24 

17 

25 

UvwpooJ 

17 

7 

4 

8 

30 

24 

25 

Ipswich 

Coventry 

17 

17 

510 
6 6 

2 

5 

22 

21 

19 

22 

25 

24 

Tottenham 

17 

5 

7 

5 

17 

22 

22 

Leeds Utd 

17 

5 

6 

6 

28 

28 

21 

Mkfcflesbro 

17 

5 

6 

6 

27 

27 

21 

Staff Wed 

17 

4 

8 

5 

19 

20 

20 

Sttwmctan 

17 

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7 

8 

15 

19 

19 

Oldham Ath 17 

4 

6 

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27 

30 

18 

ShrfTUW 

17 

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17 

23 

18 

Everton 

17 

4 

4 

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13 

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16 

Wknbfadon 

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CPaface 

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Notlm For 

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11 


experince, while Lee has such 
a willingness to a tt ac k goal he 
generates and encourages a 
more positive attitude 
throughout If Bryan and Lee 
remain fit we have a great 
chance of winning die 
championship. 

“My team is looking good at 
the moment and our aim is a 


simple one — to string togeth- 
er a few victories in the league 
and to keep in touch with the 
pack above us.” 

As long as BrightweQ is 
passed fit, Reid hopes to name 
a fito-strength side and mate 
amends for the unscheduled 
1-0 defeat at home to Totten- 
ham Hotspur last week. “I 
was very disappointed both 
with our form and our perfor- 
mance during the course of 
last week’s defeat which end- 
ed a run of four straight wins." 
Reid said. “Having said that I 
must say that my players have 
been most impressive in train- 
ing all week, and I am hopeful 
that they have got that poor 
result out of their systems.” 

Cantona can guarantee 
himself a place in the hearts of 
United supporters with a goaL 
To do that he must not only 
appear on the pitch, but also 
outwit a City defence includ- 
ing, in Keith Curie and Terry 
Phelan, Britain’s costliest 
defenders. 

Saturday portrait; page 30 


Sterling ends farce fittingly 


Peterborough United 1 

Kingstonian 0 

By Russell Kempson 

THE FA Cup evokes images 
of drama, passion, joy and 
despair. Tipy grounds over- 
flowing with ejqxctariom 
giant-kill mg in the air. 
Kingstonian bowed out at 
London Road yesterday amid 
eerie echoes and deserted 
terraces. It was no way to go. 

Nobody wanted a replay of 
the first-round replay, which 
ended 9-1 to Pet e rborough 
but was erased by the Foot- 
ball Association after Adrian 
Blake, the Kingstonian goal- 
keeper, had been struck fay a 
coin and carted off to hospi- 
tal, with the score 3-0. 

A behind-dosed-doon re- 
match was ordered, hence the 

1 00-strong gathering of offici- 
als, media and invita&RKnily 


spectators on a cold, crisp 
afternoon in Cambridgeshire. 
“It was a force. I’m stifi 
bitterly dis ap pointed with the 
FA.” Chris Kelly, the 
Kingstonian manager, said. 

Kelly said that, at most a 
neutral venue should have 
been used. The powers-that- 
be decreed otherwise and the 
Kingstonian players, six- 
teenth in the Diadora League 
premier division, had to beg, 
steal and borrow time off 

Adie Cowler, the captain, 
snatched barely an hours’ 
steep after a mgjtf sorting out 
his interior design business; 
Andy Pair worked late paint- 
ing and decorating; Dave 
Kempton forfeited £100 to 
take a day off selling cheese. 

“I just wantto forget the 
whole episode,” Cowler said. 
“If this is what professional 
football is all about. I’m glad 
I’m not good enough.” 

Kingstonian’s preparations 


included breakfast at Fkt 
Boys Cafeand a spell of Space 
Invaders. It was nothing to 
the strange scenario ahead. 
Peterborough, tenth in the 
first division, did their best 
Kingstonian scrapped like a 
non-League side should. Ev- 
ery expletive could be heard; 
every robust challenge rever- 
berated round the rafters. 

Bizarre circumstances cried 
out for a bizarre ending and it 
arrived in the 68th minute. 
Cooper's cross flic k ed off 
Kempton and hit Sterling frill 
in the face before going in. “I 
don’t know what any of us 
were doing here,” Chris 
Turner, the Peterborough 
manager. sakL His words, not 
for the first time, echoed true. 

PETBIBOROUQH UNITED: i Broad; O 
~ R Robfraon. M Habal, L 


S Enema, 0 Brocks**, D KMTptan, D 
Hartow. P Stafcrt* fair: R Chany). F 
Vines. R SratfnwsltB, A P*t 
:R 


England faces 
political battle 
for World Cup 

By Alan Lee. cricket correspondent 


THE fragile unity of interna- 
tional cricket is once more 
threatened with divisions as 
the contest to stage toe next 
Worid Cup enters a complex, 
political, and potentially cha- 
otic voting phase. 

England’s bid, the details of 
winch were announced yester- 
day, co mmits £5 piflHrm to 
their vision of a fiveweek 
tournament in May and June 
of 1995. It is undeniably an 
impressi ve proposal, but it will 
not necessarily win toe way. 

The joint bid from India, 
Pakistan, and Sri Lanka is 
believed to be worth slightly 
less as an overall package, but 
sets out to woo toe support of 
toe minor cricketing countries 
by promising a high input to 
toe Associate Members Tro- 
phy, from which three teams 
MB qualify for toe World Cup. 

The subcontinent is playing 
a canny political game, some- 
thing which was always likely 
once this most prestigious of 
cricketing events had been put 
out to tender, rather than 
being awarded on a rota basis 
as England daimed was cor- 
rect Money, as ever, win hold 
the gr e ate st sway, but political 
pressures will also be brought 
to bear in coining weeks, and 
there is no guarantee of a 
derisive or amkahfe resolution 
before next summer. 

A special meeting of the 
International C ricket Council 
(ICC) has been scheduled for 
February 2 in London. There 
is talk of avoiding this expense 
fay taking a postal vote, but this 
is surety wishfu l thinking 
Cricket has never before held 

an ancrirm of this nature or 

magnitude, and the existing 
voting procedures look dan- 
gerously outdated. 

Two-thirds of toe nine frill 
members are needed for a 
majority derision, but neither 
bidder seems likely to achieve 
this. The key is held by toe 
African nations; if both South 
Africa and Zimbabwe vote for 
England, they would decide 
the issue, but Zimbabwe have 
already intimated they wifl 
support toe subcontinent 
while South Africa has yet to 
make its position known. 

The associate members, 
who each have one vote 
against toe full members’ two, 
further complicate any prog- 
nosis. But tire most intriguing 
aspect is that the ICC constitu- 
tion still contains scope for the 
two foundation members, 
England and Australia, to 
apply their veto on any oppost- 


The winning team would 
receive £50.000, and there 
would be a guarantee of 
£300.000 to each full mem- 
ber. These figures double the 
rewards available from toe last 
World Cup in Australasia, and 
reflect toe growth of the event 
and its attraction as a tele- 
vision spectacle. 



Insole: optimistic 


Retaliation from the top 

By David Powell athletics correspondent 


THE International Amateur 
Alhletic Federation (IAAF) 
yesterday met fire with fire 
and said that it might seek 
damages for libel against 
Butch Reynolds, the 400 me- 
tres worid record-holder who 
on Thursday was awarded 
$27.3 million (about El 8 mil- 
lion) in damages against the 
IAAF. 

A United States District 
Court in Cohimbus, Ohio, 
ruled that the world governing 
body of athletics should pay 
$6.S million to Reynolds for 
loss of earnings during his 
two-year suspension for drug 
abuse and $20.5 million in 
punitive damages. The federa- 
tion said that the court did not 
have jurisdiction over it and 
reprated its stance yesterday. 
“This judgment is worthless." 
an IAAF statement said. 

The same statement went 
on not only to threaten action 
against Reynolds for alleged 
libel but to suggest that h may 
impose a further suspension. 
Reynolds is already under an 
extended ban. the IAAF hav- 
ing added five months to his 


original two-year suspension, 
for drag abuse in 1990. The 
extended ban is due to end on 
December 3 1 and Reynolds is 
planning to race indoors in 
New York in February. 

Yesterday’s IAAF statement 
added: “The IAAF council wall 
consider toe possibility of com- 
mencing proceedings against 
Mr Reynolds for libel and 
taking further disciplinary ac- 
tion under IAAF rules." 

The move, the statement 
said, would be to “defend the 
honour and integrity of its 
members, accredited laborato- 
ries, arbitration panel mem- 
bers, medical committee and 
doping commission members 
and officials.” The next IAAF 
council meeting is planned for 
Jakarta in January. 

Reynolds’s lawyers also took 
an attacking stance and 
threatened to target IAAF 
sponsors. “It will be a long 
process but. if necessary, we 
will take it to Atlanta {the 
venue for the Otyrnplc Gaines] 
in 1996,” Mimi Dane, an 
attorney for Reynolds, said. 
She added that they would 


seek to sequestrate money 
owed to the IAAF by Ameri- 
can sponsors. 

Last January, Mobil an- 
nounced from New York a 
four-year extension to its 
sponsorship of the IAAF 
grand prix. It pays $763,000 
in prize-money each year, tart 
the IAAF said yesterday that 
the finance came from Mobil 
outside toe United States and 
that it has no sponsors’ money 
there. Coca-Cola. Visa and 
Snickers are also sponsors of 
the LAAFs worid series. 

The IAAF said that toe issue 
presented no threat to athletics 
at the 1996 Olympic Games 
because they are organised ty 
the International Olympic 
Committee and are not finan- 
ced by federation money. No 
IAAF championships are 
scheduled in America before 
1996. 

The first IAAF event where 
its officials may become sub- 
ject to United States law is the 
indoor meeting in Johnson 
City on January 30. The IAAF 
said yesterday: “Everything 
proceeds as normaL" 


A day in the 
life of a 
legend 

Forth Worth: Out here, deep 
in toe heart of Texas, a new 
sporting hero has broken 
from cover. His name is 
Neale Smith, and he comes 
from Bega, in New South 
Wales, Australia. He seems to 
be one of those people who is 
so extraordinarily talented at 

never^Mle^^arit at one 
single thing. 

He is a rather long-in-the- 
tooth 27. He is in toe United 
States completing his educa- 
tion. and has done a masters 
degree in sports psychology. 
And be has just qualified for 
toe $70 million United States 
golf tour, finishing joint first 
in toe PGA qualifying tour- 
nament at Woodlands Coun- 
try Club in Houston. 

It turns out that such a feat 
is pretty routine for Smith. In 
one 24-hour period back in 
Bega — said to be toe 
Eastbourne of New South 
Wales — he 

• played a three-under-par 


round in his golf club's 
monthly medal tournament; 

• scored a century in first- 
grade cricket 

• scored 49 of the 54 points 
recorded by his local basket- 
ball team , and 

• cleared seven feet in toe 
high jump at an athletics 
meeting. 

Smith has already won a 
Pacific Gaines gold medal for 
the high jump (dealing 
2.32m) and played junior 
rugby league for New South 
Wales w hile still at primary 
schooL He is a sporting 
legend — in Bega. if nowhere 
else. 



SIMON 

BARNES 

Sporting Diary 



Horse sense 

The big event here is not toe 
Davis Cup final at all, but the 
National Cutting Horse As- 
sociation Wodd Futurity. In 
an audience of wafl-io-waH 
hats on top and wall-to-wall 
boots below, horses with 
names like Rambiin Ricky 
Rey, lithe Bitty Dariin and 
Xil Sugar Snap dance in front 
of cows in a glorious display 

In the firing line 

AH America is taken up with 
the Marge Schott case: one of 
those utterly bizarre itcould- 
only-happen-here stories. 
Schott is a tough, hard- 
drinking, hard-smoking old 
lady who owns toe Cinanaiti 
Reds baseball team. She 
achieved cult status when the 
Reds won toe Wodd Series in 
1990. But now she has 
become a national hate ob- 
ject She has been alleged to 


of horsemanship and equine 
agility. Ronnie Rice is lead- 
ing as I write. He said of his 
session with Sugar Ray Lena: 
“They left me decent cows 
and be was dead on. His eye 
appeal and his physical abili- 
ty are his strong points. As far 
as ability, there's nothing he 
can't do." There are times 
when America feds about as 
accessible as die Russian 
Orthodox church. 

use racial terms in conversa- 
tion. She allegedly refers to 
the Japanese as “Japs” and to 
Jews as “Jew-bastards”. 

She also allegedly referred 
to Dave Parker, a leading 
player with toe Reds in the 
Eighties, as “the million dol- 
lar nigger”. Parker is consid- 
ering legal action. 

There are calls for her to 
resign and calls for her to 
apologise. A thousand com- 
mentators have pointed out 
how toe affair shows what is 


Entry (winning) 

Here is the latest limerick, 
and it wins this week’s bottle 
of ambrosial Calem Cdhdtas 
1978 port. It goes to Peter 
Eramens for mis effort of 
tortured syntax: 

This country expects Gas- 
coigne (Paid), 

That wizard of fine control 
(ball). 

To win, handed-single. 

The World Cup Jbr Engl- 
and. That looks a rad 
order (tall). 

I have still more bottles of 
nectar to give away, so keep 
the limericks coming. Show 
my postman no mercy. 

wrong with Schott, baseball 
and. best of all America. 
Schott has defended herself 
vigorously and said with 
wonderful ambiguity: “I 
don’t dunk good blacks like 
this.” 

□ More good news about the 
way the country has united 
behind the Manchester bid 
for the 2000 Olympics. 
Rangers have refused to al- 
low ibrox to be used Jbr the 
early rounds of the Olympic 
football tournament 


tion by voting together. AD in 
all it is a confusing prospect 
even for those concerned, and 
officers of toe ICC are fervent- 
ly hoping that one or other bid 
receives a dear majority on a 
first vote to avoid their rules 
and procedures being held up 
to yet more unfavourable 
scrutiny. 

The English tender, com- 
piled tty a sub-committee 
chaired by Douglas Insole and 
approved by the Test and 
County Cricket Board, em- 
phasises the logistical and 
climatic advantages of staging 
in this country what is now a 
high-profile and hectic event 
Ease of travel Is highlighted, 
along with quality of practice 
facilities and preparatory 
fixtures. 

“Finance is not the overrid- 
ing factor” Insole said, per- 
haps optimistically. He went 
on to point out that on toe 
three previous occasions when 
England has been the venue, 
only one of 57 matches was 
not completed. 

The long daylight hours are 
an attraction, and although 
India will offer some floodlit 
venues, the English view is 
that daytime cricket is “less 
artificial”. 

If toe cup comes here, the 
12 teams \rifl be divided into 
two leagues, the top four in 
each going on to a knockout 


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ALAN COREN 

Feathers fly in 
Cricklewood 

Page 8 


WHAT TO WEAR 


IPP Party faithful 

twentysomethings 




CAITLIN 
MORAN ON 
REVOLUTION 
Page 18 


Page 10 











THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 


3 


Traditional Anglicanism may be in 
decline, says Matthew d’Ancona, but 
spirituality is finding other expression 

T omorrow the chapel of church's 13,000 parishes dedii 
Buckingham Palace wffl by 13 per cent (to 1.4 million), 
resound to sung Eucha- in the eyes of some outside 
rist. as. a few miles swav. Anoiioon tr-a/iitinn « /lamina 


High spirits and happy souls 


KGOLDWATEFWiETWOHK 


R&-.. 


T omorrow the chapel of 
Buckingham Palace wffl 
resound to sung Eucha- 
rist, as, a few miles away, 
believers at Hampton Court listen 
to the address of Dr David Hope, 
Bishop of London and stalwart 
opponent of female ordination. 

In Merseyside, home-based re- 
treatants attached to the Centre of 
lgnatian Spirituality wffl continue 
their pursuit of the centuries-old 
spiritual path set down by the 
founder of the Jesuits, while further 
south, a throng of young families 
enjoys the lively evangelical services 
at St Thomas Crook's Church in 
Sheffield. 

Heading southwest, the eight- 
man community at the Barn, in 
Tomes, Devon, will be completing 
Buddhist meditation exercises 
about the same time, before a busy 
day's work in harmony with the 
land. Who said we live in a 

spiritless land? 

To go in search 

of British spiritual- 'FjVPTI 1 

ity is a curious task. XJVV ' li J 

We might begin by ~ r 

examining the state W1J.U L 

of the Church of 

England — usually 1X10111 

the first crystal ball 

into which the opti- jjtll 

mists and the <*lii 

doom-mongers T Hoi 

peer to test the A UCI 

strength of die na- 
tion’s soul spir 

For Fr Philip r 

UrseU, principal of eprs 

Oxford’s tradit- 
ionalist seminary. • naf 
Pusey House, there XI-ClL 

is little to be cheer- 
iul about in the 
spiritual state of the nation. M I 
wonder if British spirituality actual- 
ly exists now. If s become confused 
with a sort of Engti^i sentimental- 
ity — being nice to animals and 
helping oldladies across the road." 

Defenders of the church would 
say that the General Synod’s deci- 
sion to admit women to the 
priesthood last month was an act of 
clarity and conviction which will fill 
the pews once more. But Fr UrseU 
believes that such flaunting of 
tradition is detrimental to 
spirituality. 

"There’s a dedine in knowledge 
of Common Prayer, the Coverdale 
translations of the Psalms and the 
authorised version of the Bible.” he 
says. “It’s something that’s hap- 
pened since the war. pantheist 
religion in school assemblies, the 
departure of children from Sunday 
schools. For me. the decline of the 
Prayer Book is the dedine of 
English religion.” 

Attendances at ordinary Sunday 
services fell again in 1 990 by 1 per 
cent, while membership in the 


I t's a funny thing the way 
humans seem unable to learn 
from their mistakes. Even the 
lowliest of invertebrates has a 
modicum of intelligence. Enough 
to enable worms, for example, to 
I earn eventually to stop turning left 
where they receive an electric shock, 
in favour of the right turn, which is 
neutral 

This topic came up last Sunday 
when we finished lunch at 3.45pm 
and found, as we looked out at the 
encircling gloom, that we had left it 

too laic to go far a walk. It has been 

dark at 4.30 for a number of weeks 
now, tart each one of the five adults 
present had promoted the condi- 
tions whereby lunch started late 
and inevitably finished late, despite 
the fact that we had all desperately 
wanted to go for a walk. 

We had also failed to buy enough 
wine from Waitrose on Friday 
night, so that when we ran out on 
Sunday we were forced to go to the 
local pub and pay £2.50 more a 
bottle for bad wine than we would 
have paid for good from the 


‘Even in those 
who declare 
themselves 
atheists 
I detecta 
spiritual 
second 
nature’ 


church's 1 3,000 parishes 
|ty 1 3 per cent (to 1.4 million). But 
in the eyes of some outride the 
Anglican tradition, a dedine in 
church attendances is not necessar- 
ily an indication of spiritual lethar- 
gy. Dr Hesham el-Essawy, director 
of the Islamic Society for Religious 
Tolerance, says: “The British are. 
by nature, spiritual Even in those 
who declare themselves atheists, 1 
detect a spiritual second nature. 
That is, spiritual as opposed to 
material, the belief that there is 
deeper meaning.” 

So. however godless today’s polit- 
ical dissenters and chattering class- 
es imagine themselves to be. they 
draw from a deep spiritual well. So, 
too. do the evangelicals. After 
centuries of battle the spiritual 
moment seems to be theirs: one of 
their number is now installed in 
Lambeth Palace and the decade 
has been named after them. 
Baptist organ- 
isations such as the 
1 thnCP Oasis Trust tour the 
ulUkSt country in search of 
ap |n r p the young souls 
they say are there 
1 for the taking. They 

I01V6S fish not with nets 
but with television 
i etc walls churning out 

pop videos. The 
w- n evangelicals’ 
a “happy-clappy" 

I stye is winning of- 

tual final support, too, 
to the horror of 
fi/j the high dmrch 

“smells and beDs” 
ir/a j lobby: in July, the 

Llvl synod set up a 

working party to 
look into the role of 
rode music in worship, what die 
Bishop of Chester calls “rave in the 
nave". 

About one million British Chris- 
tians are now reckoned to classify 
themselves as evangelical and the 
number is growing. But if tins is the 
cutting edge of tire nation’s spiritu- 
ality, what does it mean? “The age 
of materialism, the secularist 
mindset, has merely demonstrated 
itself unable to address the most 
fundamental questions of our soci- 
ety," says Joel Edwards, UK dev- 
elopment director of the Evangeli- 
cal Alliance. “The evangelical 
movement — which hasn’t lost 
sight of fundamental Christianity 
but isn’t fundamentalist — recom- 
mends itself to the intelligent 
person." 

It sounds like a sales pilch, which 
is precisely what it is. Yet the 
evangelicals have a knack of turn- 
ing platitude into reality. A flick 
through the glossy pages of the 
evangelical magazine Alpha illus- 
trates the passion of their attack: 
“the confused spirituality of the 




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Rise and rejoice: at the Celestial Church of Christ in Peckham, south London, which is Nigerian in origin, worship is spontaneous, vigorous and fun 


Royal Family”, a probe into the 
“heresy” of television wrestling, 
and a fierce attack on the "blatant 
sin of Madonna” vie far the 
attention of the reader. This is 
designer religion with a vengeance. 

Thatcherism and its legacy seem 
to have played a part in defining 
the shape of Britain’s spirituality 
today. Our individualistic society 
has spawned an individualistic 
credo: a desire to find a custom- 
built approach to sdf-discoveiy. 
This is epitomised by the remark- 
able growth in popularity of the 
retreat — among all faiths. 

On the other hand, the evangeli- 
cal explosion has been explained as 
a mass psychic response to the 
recessionary pinch, a quest for new 
certainties to replace the "greed is 
good" mantra of the 1 980s. This 
seems a bit glib, as the evangelicals 
themselves point out David 
Bebbmgton. a reader in histoiy at 
Stirling University and author of 
Evangelicalism in Modem Brit- 
ain , say s that the expansion of 
higher education has produced a 


generation of intelligent, highly 
motivated believers, inclined to 
evangelical forms of spirituality. 

Does education really lead to 
faith? The reverse has often been 
true, when science and sophisticat- 
ed cynicism have undermined reli- 
gious belief. But in recent years, 
says Mr Bebbington, the evangeli- 
cal movement has been the most 
conspicuous beneficiary of “a 
strong subterranean sympathy for 
spirituality” in this country. 

S upport for spiritual prac- 
tices that look not to a God. 
but within for their person- 
al salvation — most notably 
Buddhism — has also been encour- 
aged by the 1 980s me-style dimate. 
Kulananda of the Western Bud- 
dhist Order believes: "Buddhism 
allows people to keep responsibility 
for their own spiritual lives while 
offering practical methods, such as 
meditation, for developing their 
faith.” 

A Anther development from the 
ethos of the me-genendion is the 


growing appeal of the New Age. Its 
reverence of the earth goddess and 
natural cydes stops little short of 
worship. Moreover, the “peace and 
harmony with nature” practices of 
the New Age traveller have many 
echoes of rural semi-Fagan ritual 
To my eyes, the real adherents of 
the New Age — crystals, aroma- 
therapy, Gaia, past-life therapy et 
al — are tire thirtysomethings of 
the South East who got rich under 
Thatcher, but hanker after the non- 
specific spiritualism of the 1 960s. 

Rabbi Julia Neuberger believes 
British spirituality is rooted in 
simple aesthetic appreciation (she 
rites tire new popularity of classical 
music) and a sense of community: 
national characteristics that strode 
her first as a rabbinic student "I 
would point to what goes on in 
hospices. Living and working with 
the ul and their families, there is a 
sense that the spiritual side is as 
important as the material” 

This near-equation of spirituality 
and benevolence sounds alarming- 
ly similar to what Fr Ursefl called 


"English sentimentality”. But per- 
haps that is the point Good things 
rarely submit to easy definition. It 
might be said that the essence of 
British spirituality combines princi- 
pled generosity with sheer vague- 
ness. The playwright Robert Bolt 
called it "our Island genius for 
compromise"; most aptly. Philip 
Larian called it "awkward 
reverence". 

Whatever it is, tomorrow, in the 
ante-chapel at Magdalen College, 
Oxford, it will be visible in the faces 
of those visitors gazing up at the 
extraordinary Leonardo Last Sup- 
per. now on loan from the Royal 
Academy. The painting is a truly 
startling sight, almost embarrass- 
ingly affecting. Some of the visitors 
will not have stepped inside a 
church this year. But they may spot 
a look of awe in each others eyes: 
and reflect that not all the spirits 
have flown from this odd, irreli- 
gious land. 

• “At Your Service", a new series on 
places of worship around Britain, starts 
today on page 9. 


Anglicans. 

.1.838.659 

Roman Catholics 

. [.945,626 


—241,842 

Orthodox 

—.265.258 

Other protestants 

Independent 

™ 123.677 


483.387 

AfroCaribbean 

—69.658 


27.500 


.. 140.000 

International Society for 

Krishna 

Consciousness 

—.50.000 


...108.400 



Some: UK Christian Handbook 
1992/3 (figures relate to 1991 
survey) 


All downhill on the learning curve 


supermarket or the off-licence. 

This was a fairly typical weekend 
in our cottage, or thatched hut of 
nine lavatory-sized rooms bought at 
the peak of the boom in 1988. 
When we bought it we were 
enthralled by the Enid Btyton-ness 
of having a proper country cottage. 
We soon found out why Btyton 
characters were so happy in cot- 
tages — they were all children and 
therefore of reduced stature. When 
we hear a rattaMat-tat at our door 
and we open it there is normally a 
scream of pain, as whoever was 
outside fails to stoop before coming 
in. We always forget to warn 
visitors. 

If more than two people are in 
any of the rooms at the same time 
you get a feeling of being trapped 
in a lift, and so we all go out for 
walks. Then there is a long, drawn- 
out faffing as people look for their 


Why are sensible people unable to benefit from experience? 


boots (having failed to leave IP 
them in a set place near the 
door), dog leads, gloves and 
car keys, n we are driving to 
the start-off point. 

Last weekend we had some 
people to stay in the hut. Half 
of the party arrived amazed 
that they had been stock in 
traffic at Hammersmith 
roundabout, making the 
journey take three hours in- (L 
stead of the one hour it might' 
take if you did it in the middle of the 
night But they had left on Friday 
night at rush-hour. “I always forget 
how bad the traffic is leaving 
London on a Friday night.” 
yawned one of them, as though 
saying something novel “And I’m 
afraid I drank at lunchtime and ft 



WEEKEND 

voice 

♦ 

MARY 

KILLEN 


has completely knocked me out I 
always forget how tiring drinking 
at lunchtime is.” 

Way generously, a neighbour 
had invited us all to lunch on 
Saturday- It was extremely kind of 
her. Regrettably, she put a “stay- 
cool handle" saucepan containing 


PI the lunch into the Aga instead 
of on top of it She burnt her 
hand when she took it out 
not once, but four times. 
Then her husband — who 
wrestled her out of the way in 
irritation — put on an oven 
glove and failed to remember 
that the thumb had been 
taunt through, so he burnt 
his own thumb and screamed 
J with pain. “I keep meaning to 
throw that glove away,” said 
his wife. 

Provocatively, I raised the subject 
of people being unable to learn 
from their mistakes. My husband 
volunteered the information that he 
always has his bath too hot, leaving 
himself feeling "weak and hearr- 
attacky every evening”. 


Another, a writer named Andrew 
Barrow, said that three times a 
week he found himself involved in 
a discussion about word-processors, 
and why he didn’t have one “It’s a 
very repetitive experience," he said. 
“And very unproductive. Yet some- 
howl find myself being drawn into 
it again and again," 

We all know that some people 
tend to have variations of the same 
destructive love affair with a se- 
quence of different partners, but 
somehow this seems more under- 
standable than the person who eats 
kippers on a regular basis, each 
time managing to sublimate the 
experience of “kipper burping" 
until the nod time. 

We buy books we are never going 
to read and fail to fill up with 
enough petrol, or buy enough 
stamps at the post office, when we 
know that failure to do so win mean 


another time-consuming trip into 
our local market town. 

i remember once visiting a friend 
named Liza, who lived in a balcony 
flat in Chelsea. She had been given 
a present of a rubber plant “Shall I 
let it die inside or out on the 
balcony?” she asked. Clearly, she 
had learnt from experience, and 
was only too happy to let me take it 
away. 

Try to avoid Sunday Night 
Syndrome if you can help it I 
suffered from it desperately last 
weekend. Prepare yourself for the 
fact that you are likely to go down 
with a black depression if you drink 
and over-eat at Sunday lunch and 
have filled your consciousness with 
tales of atrocities garnered fry the 
newspapers from all comers of the 
globe. Make an appointment with 
your cinema tomorrow night. Go 
and see a film called Strictly 
Ballroom. Ride out the Sunday 
Night Syndrome of being faced 
with the evidence of your own 
mistakes by. this week, planning 
ahead. 


■ 


oOO 


3? 






J 


It's our 26 year old baby . 

A Limited Edition miniature, no less, to be won answering a few potty questions 
on the back of The Macallan lOYear Old Malt Whisky's Christmas carton. 

| To say it’s like mothers milk could be seriously to under-estimate the sherry cask 
in which it has slumbered since 1966. This is voluptuous stuff and - whether you 
give or keep the bottle of 10 Year Old (no mean mouthful itself) ~ our baby 
will add a touch of private jubilation long after the festive season is over. 
Cootckee? 


( fa- . 7 r Xe_ 










THEATRE 


LONDON 


ASSASSINS: Sondheim s sharp 
and successful musical explores the 
impulse that drives no-hopers to 
kill American Presidents. 

Don mar Warehouse, Eariham 
Street, WC2 1071-367 1150). Mon- 
Sat, 7.30pm, mats Thurs, Sat. 

3pm. 


CAROUSEL Michael Hayden in 
Nicholas Hytner's large-scale 
production of the Rodgers S 
Hammerstein fairground musical 
which ran for over a year in the 
Fifties 

National (Lyttelton). South 
Bank, SE1 1071-928-2252). Previews 
tonight, Mon-Wed, 7.30pm, 
mat today, 2.15pm, opens Thurs, 
7pm; then in repertoire 

CYRANO DE BERGERAC 

Robert Lindsay in the tide rale as 
Rostand's long-nosed, long- 
distance lover. Directed by Elijah 
Moshinsky 

Theatre Royal, Haymarket, 

5W1 1071-930-5800). Previews eves. 
7.30pm; opens Dec 14, 7pm; 
then Mon-Sat. 7.30pm, mats Wed, 
Sat. 2.30pm 

HAY FEVER: Very funny 
performances (not always where you 
expect) in Coward's exceflent 
comedy. 

Aibery, St Martin's Lane. WC2 
1071-867 1115). Mon-Sat, 8pm, 
mats, Thurs, Sat. 3pm. 


THE GIFT OF THE GORGON: 

Peter Hall directs Judi Dench and 
Michael Pennington in Peter 
Shaffer's latest: revenge and/or 
justice in modem times with an 
echo of ancient Greece. 

The PR, Barbican Centre. Silk 
Street, EC2 (071-638 8891) 
Previews tonight. Wed-next Sat, 
7.15pm, matsThuis. next SaL 2pm; 
opens Dec 16 



king in Richard III 


rr RUNS IN THE FAMILY: Larks 
in the hospital common ioom; 
matron outraged; doctors 
flummoxed. Ray Cooney farce with 
lots of laughs. 

Playhouse. Northumberland 
Avenue. WC2 (071 -839 4401 >. 
Mon-Fri, dpt n. SaL 8.30pm, 
mats Thurs. Spin. Sat 5 30pm. 

JUNE MOGn: Naive song wn ter 
conquers Tin Pan Alley. Delightful 
comedy by Ring Lardner and 
George S. Kaufman. Excellent cast 
led by AdamGodley and Frank 
Lazarus. 

Vaudeville, The Strand, WC2 
(071-836 9987) Mon-Sat, 7.45pm. 
mat Sat 3pm. 


MISERY: Stknuri Giesit runner 
cop Cagney) unnerves Bill Paterson 
in stage version of the Stephen 
King thriller 

Criterion, Piccuuill) Circus, W1 
(071-839 44S8J Previews from 
Thurs. 8pm ope.-., Dec 17, 7pm; 
then Moti-Sui dpn., mats Wed, 
3pm. SaL 4pm 


NO MAN’S lAnu: Spellbinding 
journey into Pinterland with Harold 
himself diid Paul Edomgion as 


REGIONAL 


BOLTON: Bob Cartoon's 
updated panto. Aladdin Bolton 
(geddrt?) packed with Sixties 
hits. 

Octagon, Howell Croft South 
(0204 20661). Opens tonight 
7.30pm; then at various times 
daily until Jan 16. - 


LEEDS: Granny and the Gorilla, 
or "The Great Ape Escape": 
described as a hairy fairy story.. 

For children of seven and upwards, 
who sit in the middle of the 
action su rounded by a huge set 
Courtyard, West Yorkshire 
Playhouse (0532 4421 1 1). Previews 
Fri, 1 .45pm and 7pm; opens Sat 
(Dec 12), 3pm and 7pm; then 
at various times daily until 
Jan 9. 


MANCHESTER: Alan Gamer's 
compelling Elidor, a tale of a magic 
land just a twitch away from our 
own, brought to the stage; for seven 
years and upwards. 

Contact Oxford Road (061- 
274-4400). Today. 2pm and 
7.30pm, Mon, Fri, 7.30pm; and 
daily from Dec 19. 


MOLD: Charles Dickens's 
warning against being nasty to the 
staff on Christmas Eve: A 



the solution he's 
drinking could save his life. 
And it only costs lOp. 


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from delivdrulion. A condition caused by acute diarrhoea 
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Please return this coupon with your donation today. 
Thank you 

Save the Children Fund, FREEPOST, London SE5 8BR. 


WHAT’S ON 


the two stalking combatants. 
Almeida, Almeida Street, N1 
(071-359 4404). Mon-Sat, 8pm, mat 
Sat. 4pm. 

OUR SONG: Peter O'Toole in 
Keith Waterhouse's play about a 
menopausal male's infatuation 
with a young woman. Neatly done 
though we only hear the man's 
point of view. 

Apodo, Shaftesbury Avenue, 

W1 (071-494 5070). Mon-Fri, 

8. 1 5pm, Sat, 6pm and 8.45pm. 

A PENNY FOR A SONG: A 
Dorset household of eccentrics 
prepare to defend their shores 
from Napoleon's Invasion fleet John 
Whiting's engaging comedy. 

Orange Tree, Clarence Street 
Richmond (081-940 3633). Preview 
tonight 7.45pm; opens Mon, 
7.45pm; then Mon-Sat 7.45pm, 
mat Sat (from Dec 12), 4pm. 

RICHARD III: Barrie Rutter takes 
the lead and directs this aedaimed 
Northern Broadsides production 
(with the battle scene as a dog 
dance). 

Riverside Studios, Crisp Road, 
Hammersmith (081-748 3354). 
Preview Tues. 7.45pm; opens 
Wed, 7.45pm; then Mon-Sat 
730pm, mat Sat 330pm. 

STAGES: Haunting performance 
by Alan Bates as the washed-up 
artist in David Storey's elegy for 
lost times and places. Lindsay 
Anderson directs. 

National (Cotceslod). South 
Bank, SE1 (071-928 2252). Tonight 
Mon-Wed, 8pm, mats today. 

Wed, 4pm. 

THREE BIRDS ALIGHTING ON 
A FIELD: Harriet Water perfect 
again in revival of this subtle, 
comic state-of-the-nation play, set in 
a world of shifting values and 
plummeting art-prices. 

Royal Court, Stoane Square, 

SW1 (071-730 1745). Mon-Sat 
8pm, mat Sat 4pm. 1 50mins. 

TRAVELS WITH MY AUNT: 

Simon Cadell, John Wells, Richard 
Kane, Christopher Gee play all 
26 parts, male and female, in Giles 
Havergal's marvellous 
adaptation of Graham Greene's 
novel. 

Wyndham's, Charing Cross 
Road, WC2 (071-867 1116). Mon- 
Fri, 8pm, Sat 8.15pm, mats 
Wed, 3pm, Sat 5pm. 

TRELAWNY OF THE "WELLS": 

Sarah Brightman and Michael 
Hordern head a terrific cast in 
Pinero's engaging comedy about 
theatre folk in mid-Victorian 
London. 

Comedy, Panton Street SW1 
(071-867-1045). Preview tonight 
7.30pm; opens Mon, 7pm; then 
Mon-Sat 7.30pm, mats Wed, Sat 
2.30pm. 


J Your £10 could save 100 driMren j 

I Yes. I warn to help Save the Children. Please acc ept my gift of: | 

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Desperately seeking eternal smith: Meryl Streep stairs in the ice-cold black comedy Death Becomes Her {see Film) 


Christmas Carol, with new music 
and lyrics. 

Theatr dwyd. (0352 7551 14). 
Today. 2pm and 7pm; then at 
various times daUy until 
Jan 23. 


BLADE RUNNER (15): The 
improved "director's cut" of Ridley 
Scott's influential vision of a 
dark, hellish LA., infested with rebel 
androids. Harrison Fond, Rutger 
Hauer. 

Gate (071-727 4043) MGM 
Fulham Road (071-370 2636) 
M(»t Shaftesbury Avenue . 

(071 -836 6279/379 7025) Screen 
on the Green (071-226 3520). 


THE CRYING GAME (18): IRA 
gunman becomes obsessed with a 
hostage's girlfriend. Bold, 
powerful Neil Jordan film that falters 
at the dose. Stars Stephen Rea, 
Forest Whitaker, Jaye Davidson, 
Miranda Richardson. 

Gurzon Phoenix (071-240 
9661) MGM Haymarket (071-839 
1527). 


DEATH BECOMES HER (PG): 

Meryl Streep and Goldie Hawn 
battle to attain eternal youth. 
Ice-cold black comedy, ultimately 
swamped by special effects. 

Stars Bruce Willis; director. Robert 
Zemeckis. 

Empire (071-497 9999) MGM 
Baker Street (071 -935 9772) MGM 
Fulham Road (071 -370 2636) 
MGM Trocadero (071 -434 0031) 
UG Whiteleys (071-792 3332). 

ELECTRIC MOON (1 5): Pradlp 
Krishen's botched satire about 
Western tourists fed a phoney 
version of Indian life. With Roshan 
Seth. 

MGM Panton 5treet(071-930 
063 1 ) Electric (071 -792 2020). 


GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS (1 5): 

I Real-estate salesmen fight for their 
lives. Energetic version of David 
Mamet's play, though Jack Lemmon 
goes over the top. Co-starring Al 
Paano, Ed Hams; director, James 
Foley. 

Odeons: Haymarket(0426 
915353} Kensington (0426 
914666). 

HUSBANDS AND WIVES (1 5k 
Woody Allen’s best film in years, a 
lacerating tale of collapsing New 
York marriages. Stars Allen, Mia 
Farrow, Judy Davis, Liam 
Neeson, Juliette Lewis. 

Barbican (071-638 8891) MGM 
Panton Street (071-930 0631) 
Minema (071-235 4225) 

Odeons: Kensington (0426 
914666) Mezzanine (0426 
915633) Renoir (071-837 8402). 

THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS 
(12): Romance and adventure in the 
American colonies with 
frontiersman Daniel Day-Lewis. 
Shallow version of the dassc 
novel; director Michael Mann. With 
MadeJerne Stowe, Russell 
Means. 

Camden Parkway (071 -267 
7034) MGM Fulham Road (071- 
370 2636) MGM Haymartet 
(071 -839 1 527) MGM Shaftesbury 
Avenue (071 -S3 b 6279/379 
7025) MGM Trocadero (071-434 
0031) ua Whiteleys (071-792 
3332). 

OF MICE AND MEN (PG): 
Steinbeck's dass»c Depression tale of 
friendship and innocence. John 
MaJkcnnch as the slow-witted 
Lennie; director Gary Since as 
his protector. Simple, sturdy and 
moving. 

Curzon West End (071-439 
4805) MGM Fulham Road (071- 
370 2636) MGM Trocadero 
(071-434 0031) UQ Whiteleys 
(071-792 3332). 

PETER'S FRIENDS (1 5): College 
pais meet up after a decade for a 
glib mixture of laughter and 
tears. Kenneth Branagh directs 
Emma Thompson, Stephen Fry, 

Rita Rudner and himself. 

Barbican (071 -638 8891) MGM 
Chelsea (071-352 5096) MGM 
Tottenham Court Road (071- 
636 6148) MGM Trocadero (071- 
434 0031) Odeon Kensington 
(0426 914666) Plaza (071-497 
9999) Screen on Baker Street 
(071-935 2772) UO Whiteleys 
(071-792 3332). 

SINGLE WHITE FEMALE (18): 

New room-mate proves a crackpot. 
Nicety atmospheric, but the 

crudities mount. Bridget Fonda, 
Jennifer Jason Leigh; director, 

Barbet Schroeder. 

MGM Chebea (071-352 5096) 
Odeons: Kensington (0426 


914666) Leicester Square 
(0426 91 5683) Ua Whiteleys 
(071-792 3332). 


OXFORD: Daydreaming Princess 
Foolina and mischievous Tom Foot in 
Fooling About, by the team who 
produced last year's delightful Magic 
Storybook. 

Playhouse, Beaumont Street 
(0865 798600). Today, Mon, 2pm 
and 7pm; then at various times 
daily until Jan 23. 

SOUTHAMPTON: Granville 
Saxton directs Sinbad's Arabian 
Nights, with stunts, glitter and, 
apparently, a full 40 thieves. 
Nuffield, University Road (0703 
671771). Previews from This's, 
7.30pm; opens Dec 15, 7.30pm; 
then at various times daily until 
Jan16. 


SISTER ACT (PG): Whoopi 
Goldberg hides out in a convent. 
Contrived but disarming, warm- 
hearted comedy. Maggie Smith as 
the Mother Superior. Director, 

Emile Ardofino. 

Camden Parkway (071 -267 
7034) MGM Baker 5treet (071-935 
9772) MGM Oxford Street 
(071-636 0310) MGM Chelsea 
(071-352 5096) Odeons: 
Kensington (0426 914666) Marble 
Arch (0426 914501) West Bid 
(0426 915574} UO Whiteleys 
(071-792 3332). 


bom JlrT Kyflan has turned it Into 
one of the world's finest on the 
strength of his powerful and 
eloquent choreography. This is the 
troupe's ftist visit to Britain in 17 
years and will be wed worth the trip 
to Bradford for serious dance 
fans. 

Alhambra Theatre, Moriey 
Street, Bradford (0274 752000), 
Tues-next Sal, 730pm. 


SLACKER (1 Sy. College-age 
layabouts in Austin, Texas, vent 
crazy thoughts on life, the 
Smurfs and UFOs. Striking debut by 
film-maker Richard Unklater, 
with an amateur cast 
Metro (071-437 0757). 


STRICTLY BALLROOM (PG): 

One dancer's fight to defy the rules 
of the Australian Ballroom 
Dancing Federation. Ebullient debut 
by director Baz Luhrmann. With 
Paul Mercurio, Tara Morice. 

MGM Chebea (071 -352 5096 ) 
MGM Oxford Street (071 -636 
0310) Odeons: Ke ns ington 
(0426 914666) West End (0426 
915574) Renoir (071 -837 8402) 
Screen on Baker Street (071-935 
2772} Ua Whiteleys (071 -792 
3332). 


THIS IS MY UFE(12); When a 
single parent becomes a top 
comedienne, what happens to 
her two needy kids? Patchy comedy 
with tears. Director, Nora 
Eptuon. ' 

Chebea (071-351 3742/3743) 
MGM Tottenham Court Road - 
(071 -636 6146} Screen on the 
HiB (071 -435 3366). 


THOUSAND PIECES OF GOLD: 

Adventures of a Chinese girl 
(Rosalind Chao) sent to a Gold 
Rush mining town. Slickly packaged 
mush: an American TV movie 
writ large. Director, Nancy Kefly. 
National Hfan Theatre (071- 
9283232). 


BILLY BUDD: Opera North 
opens its winter season in Leeds 
with Graham Vick's staging (a 
co-production with Scottish Opera) 
of Britten's gripping saga of 
strife at sea. Nigel Robson is Captain 
Vere, Jason Howard sings the 
title role, John Tomlinson is 
Claggart, Keith Latham. Donald. 
Elgar Howarth conducts. 

Grand Theatre, 46 New 
Briggate, Leeds (0532 
459351/440971), Fri, 7pm. 

DIDO AND ABlIEAS: Purcefl's 
.miniature masterpiece is given an 
"authentic" staged performance 
by the English Bach Festival, the first 
in a series of events to celebrate 
the pioneering ensemble's 30th 
anniversary. The cast indudes 
Defla Jones, Nigel Leesoo- Williams 
and Marilyn HBl Smith. David 
Wray directs the English Bach 
Festival Baroque Ensemble, 

Singers and Dancers. 

Queen Elizabeth Hall, South 
Bank, London 5E1 (071-928 8300). 
Mon, 7.45pm. 


THE DREAM/TALES OF 
BEATRIX POTTER: Two works by Sir 
Frederick Ashton make up this 
Royal BaBet double bill. The Dream is 
a delightful and poetic 
distillation of Shakespeare's A 
Midsummer Night's Dream; 

Beatrix Potterwas a popular 1971 
film, here being given Its first live 
performances in a new stage 
adaptation. 

Royal Opera House, Covent 
Garden, London WC2 (071-240 
1066), tonight. 730pm, next 
Sat 2.30pm and 730pm. 


SAUL AND DAVID: Long 
neglected outside Denmark, this 
opera by Cart Nielsen deserves 
attention not only as a continuation 
of the composer's symphonies 
by other means, but also as a 
dramatic work in its own right 
For the concert performance, under 
the auspices of the 'Tender is 
the North" festival, Andrew Davis 
conducts the BBC Symphony 
Orchestra and Chorus. Ulrik Cold 
and Kurt Westi are the 
protagonists. 

Barbican, Silk Street, London 
EC2 (071-638 8891), Mon, 7.30pm. 

CLASSICAL 


MAYBiUNG: A rare chance to 
see the superb Stephen Jefferies in 
one of his finest rates: the 
doomed Crown Prince Rudolf In 
MacMillan's sensational ballet of 
sex and death in tum-of-the-centuiy 
Austria. The fine Lesley Collier is 
his mistress Mary Vetsera. 

Royal Opera House (as above), 
Thurs, 730pm. 


NETHERLANDS DANCE 
THEATRE: Since taking over this 
company in 1978, the Czech- 


TENDEH IS THE NORTH: A 
week-long mini-festival within this 
month's celebration of Non*: 
culture focuses on new music A 
series of concerts by the 
ensemble Avantil (Tues, Wed, Thurs, 
730pm), the Ardrtti Quartet (Fri, 
7.30pm) and the Kroumata 
Percussion Ensemble (next Sat, 
7.30pm) aims to put works by 
contemporary Scandinavian 
composers in context by 
programming them alongside 
20th-century classics by 


EVENINGS OUT 


DAVID FREEMAN 
DIRECTOR OF OPERA FACTORY 





6 1 think it would be a very good idea if people in London got 
used to the idea that they don’t necessarily have to see plays in 
English. I have very much enjoyed Thelma Holfs series of 
foreign language imports which finishes next week with The 
Tempest in Japanese (last performances today at RSC Barbican). 
Often in England theatre is just talk, but there are many other 
things you can get out of it. I’d also like to see Tale of a Vampire 
(MGM Oxford Street). It’s an English-language film by foe 
Japanese director Shirnako Sato. I really like vampire stories and 
this film looks more interesting than the usual ones. I very much 
enjoyed The Art of Ancient Mexico exhibition at foe Hayward 
Gallery (until Sunday). Mexican art is very approachable co us 
today because it had such an enormous influence on 20th- 
century painters and sculptors. It doesn’t look nearly as alien as it 
probably did in 1900. 3 


Berg, Ligeti, Messiaen and 
Takemteu. 

The Place, 1 7 Duke's Road, 
London WC1 (071-387 0031). 


LONDON QTY BALLET: The 

company opens its annual Sadler's 
Welts season on Tuesday with its 
production of Romeo and JuTiet The 
first-night cast features Kim 
Mifer and Paul Thrussell as 
Shakespeare's lovers; later in the 
week guest artists Eva Evdokimova 
and Paul ChaJmer take the 
leading rotes at some performances. 
Sadler's Wells, Rosebery 
Avenue, London ECl (071-278 
8916), Tues-next Sat 7.30pm. 
mat next Sat, 2.30pm. 


LONDON SINFONIETTA: The 
group's 25th anniversary 
celebrations continue with a 
concert under Lothar Zagrasek 
which includes music by 
Lutoslawskl, Femeyhough and 
Birtwistle, as well as a new work 
by the eclectic young American 
composer Michael Torice. 

Queen Elizabeth Hatt, South 
Bank, London SE1 (071-928 8800), 
Tues, 7.45pm. 


NASH ENSEMBLE: in an 
inspired piece of programming the 
Nadi celebrate die reopening of 
the Wiqmore Hall with a series of 
concerts commemorating great 
occasions in the history of London’s 
best-loved recital venue. The 
first, tomorrow at 4pm, evokes the 
Faure memorial concert of June 
9, 1925. Yvonne Kenny, Sarah 
Walker and Adrian Thompson 
are the vocal soloists in the aB-Faufe 
programme, which indudes not 
only songs but the two Piano 
Quartets, and musk for viola 
and piano. Four further concerts in 
the series are planned between 
January and Aprfl. 

Wigmore Hall, 36 Wigmore 
Street, London W1 (071-9352141), 
tomorrow, 4pm. 


S.C.R. Concert 

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Great days: leaflet from foe 
Wigraore’s past (see above) 


BARBARA THOMPSON’S 
SANS FRONTIERS: The British 
saxophonist and composer has 
brought together some of Europe's 
finest jazz musicians in a band 
featuring Italian tiumpeter 
Enrico Rava, exhilarating Dutch 
pianist Jasper Van’ t Hof, Danish 
bassist Bo Stieff, Polish 
violinist Michael Urbaniak and 
Thompson's husband, fusion 
drummer Jon Hiseman. 

Regal Arts Centre, Worksop 
(0909 482896), Tues, 730pm, 
University of Warwick Arts 
Centre, Coventry (0203 524524), 
Thurs, 8pm. StaMes Theatre, 
Wawendon (0908 583928), Fri, 
7.15pm. 

MOTHER EAffTH/THE 
SANDALS/CORDUROY: Bringing 
elements of rock music Into jazz 
can result in soulless techno- 
wizardry. Not so in the case of 
these bohemian 19705-style 
funk bands that each bring 
essential dynamism to groovy 
compositions. . 

Jazz Cafe. London NW1 (071- 
284 4358), Tues. 7pm. 


TOE JESUS AND MARY 
CHAIN: Foftawing the success of 
their American tour the roof- 
raising Retd brothers hit town for a 
one^iff gig. 

Brixton Academy. London 
SW9 (071-326 1022), tonight, 
730pm. 

SHAKY: Your mother's 
favourite rock 'n' roller, these days 
on first name terms, heads for 
the capital on the last leg of 
his tour. 

St David's Hall, Cardiff (0222 
371236). tomorrow, 7pm. White 
Rode. Hastings (0424 722755). 
Mon, 7.15pm. Arana, Ryde (0983 
615155). Tues, 7.15pm. 

Dominion , London W1 (071-580 
8845), Wed, 6.45pm. 

SONIC YOUTH: One of the 
bands that presaged the coming of 
Nirvana, Sonic Youth re-emerge 
after a two-year absence with a 
varied album of boisterous 
gutar tunes; Dirty. 

Rainbow Gub, Bristol (0272 
304466). Mon, 7pm. 
Hummingbird, Birmingham 
(021-236 4236), Tues, 7pm. 
Academy, Manchester (061- 
275 2930), Wed, 7pm. 
Barrowfands, Glasgow (031- 

557 6969), Thurs. 7pm. 

OZY 5TRADUN AND THE JU 
JU HOUNDS: The former rhythm 
guitarist of Guns N’Roses has 
turned he back on stadium excesses 
to form a dassk, rootsy rock 
band. 

Rode Gty, Nottingham (0602 
412544), Wed, 8pm. Town & 
Country Oub. Leeds (0532 
442999J, Thurs, 8pm. Town Hal). 
Mlddtesborough (0642 242 56 1 ), 

Fri, 7pm. 




SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 


THE DISPOSABLE HEROES OF 
Hn*HOWtiSY:The Heroes may not 
be the wild boys of rap but they 
have a fine kne In caustic social 
comment The laid-back 
dcBASEHEAD offers strong 
support 

University. Birmingham (021- 

472 1841 ), Thurs. 7 . 30 pm. 


THE GIANTS OF ROCK "N* 
ROLL On hs fast visit to the UK 
for 15 yeas, Little Richard Is 
joined by feflow greats Including 
Jerry Lee Lewis. Bobby Vee and 
Duane Eddy. 

Wembley Arena, Middlesex 
(081-900 1234), tonight. 7pm. 


AT PLAY IN THE HELDS OF 
THE LORD (Entertainment Video, 
15): Missionaries, Indians and a 
half-Cheyenne drop-out dash in the 
Amazon jungle. Hector 
Babenco's laboured version of Peter 
Matthlessen's novel, with Tom 
Berenger, Daryl Hannah. It means 
weH, at least 1991. 


BATMAN RETURNS (Warner, 

1 5): Undeniably quirky but mean- 
spirited sequel, best when the 
spotlight fells on Michefle Pfeiffer's 
etetirifyfog Catwoman. As 
before, Michael Keaton gets easily 
swamped as the raped crusader. 
Director, Trm Burton. 1992. 


THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT 
BRIGADE (Connoisseur. PG): Its 
flaws are writ large, yet Tony 
Richardson's f3m about the Crimea 
refuses to lie down. Great 
battles, dever finking animation 
(Richard Williams), a witty 
Charles Wood script and an 
amusing John Gielgud 
performance. 1 968. Available from 
W.H. Smith, or mail order from 
Connoisseur Video, 10a Stephen 
Mews, London WIP OAX. 


THE PLAYER (Guild, 15): 

Dazzling, whirlwind satire on 
Hollywood, directed by Robert 
Altman from Michael To! bn’s novel. 
Tim Robbins as the studio 
executive who kills a writer plus 
cameos galore. 1992. 


EXHIBITIONS 


ORANGERIE fTAUANA 1992: 

Now In its third edition, this is the 
only fair in Britain devoted to 
Italian works of art and antiquities. 
Some 40 dealers take part; 
works on view range from antique 
sculptures and medieval 
illuminated manuscripts to 19th- 
century paintings. Admission for 
Times readers Is £3.50 — rather 
than £5 — on presentation of 
today's edition. 

Academia ftaRana, 24 
Rutland Gate, SW7 (071 -225 3474). 
Mon-Fri, 1 1am-7pm, Sat-Sun, 

1 1 am-6pm, Wed-Dec 1 8. 


SICKERT: Since Sickert was last 
shown extensively in London, tastes 
have changed. Although the 
artist's early works, reflecting his 
cosmopolitan experience with 
Whistler and the Impressionists, 
have retained their lofty status, 
they have been increasingly joined of 
late by the once-despised work 
of his old age, based frequently on 
newspaper photographs or 
Images from pop culture of the day. 
This 134-work show gives ample 
opportunity to see both sides. 

Royal Academy of Arts, 

Piccadilly W1 (071-439 7438). Daily 
10an>-6pm. until Feb 14. 


ERIC GILL: The first to 
concentrate on Gill's major 
sculptures, this show presents 
him as one of the most brilliant of all 
stone-carvers. The works 
combining erotic and religious 
elements are wonderfully 
cheery; there is no sense of guilt or 
incongruity here to mar 
enjoyment of them. 

Barbican Art GaHery, Barbican 
Centre EC2 (071-638 4141). Mon, 
Wed, Sat 10am-6.45pm, Tues 
10am-5.45pm, Sun midday-6.45pm, 
until Feb 7. 


EDVARD MUNCH: This major 
show is devoted to the paintings, 
drawings and prints made by 
Munch in the 1890s in connection 
with his great autobiographical 
scheme The Frieze of Ufe. Some 85 
pieces are drawn from three 
great Norwegian collections, mostly 
never seen before in Britain. 
National Gallery, Trafalgar 
Square, WC2 (071-839 3321). Daily, 
1 0am-6pm (Wed to 8pm), until 
Feb 7. 


ALLAN RAMSAY: The 
portraitist was brilliant with 
characterful men, but had a 
special talent for depicting women 
in an uns pedal way, as people 
rather than dothes+iorses or 
stereotypes of femininity. 

National Portrait Gallery. St 


Martin's Place, WC2 (071-306 
0055). Mon-Fri, lOam-Spm, Set, 
I0am-6pm, Sun. 2-6pm, until 
Jan 17. 


THE SWAGGER PORTRAIT: 

There has never — until recently — 
been any lade In British painting 
of portraitists ready to supply 
something obviously impressive 
for their patrons. Van Dyck was the 
founding father, his followers in 
the tradition range from Lety and 
Knefler to Sargent and Augustus 
John These pictures are full of pridtk 
in position and possession. ' 

Tate Gallery, Millbank. SW1 
(071-821 1313). Mon-Sat. 10am- 
6pm. Sun, 2-6pm, until Jan 10. 



BEARDSLEY TO BOM8ERG: A 

further trawl through the permanent 

collection of the Tate has 
brought to the surface a remarkable 
group of rarely shown worts on 
paper from the period 1870-1920. 
or the beginnings of the 
Aesthetic movement to the fist 
heyday of Modernism in Britain. 
Some of Beardsley’s finest decadent 
drawings are here, as well as 
those of the Camden Town Group. 
Paul Nash and Bomberg. 

Tate Gallery, MiUbank. SW1 
(071-821 1313). Mon-Sat, 10am- 
6pm, Sun, 2 -6pm, until Feb 14, 



Decadent Beardsley’s coyer 
design for the Yellow Book y 


BOOKINGS 


THE BIRMINGHAM ROYAL 
BALLET: The company's Sadler's 
Wells season offers Kurt Jooss's 
anti-war satire. The Green 7a£te— 
one of the most popular and 
powerful ballets of the 20th centuiy 
— David Bentley's delightful 
Hobson's Choice; and The Snow 
Queen, Bintieys ballet, based on 
Hans Christian Andersen's fairytale 
and designed by Terry Bartlett. 
Sadler's Wefts, Rosebery 
Avenue, London ECl (071-278 
8916), Feb 2-13. 


CHINESE LAQUER: Most Of the 
works on display come from the 
collection of the late Jean-Piene 
Dubose a leading authority on 
Chinese art and a pioneer 
Western collector. Seven pieces date 
from as early as the Song 
Dynasty 060-1279 AD); others, 
from the time of Kublal Khan 
and his successors. The latest pieces 
belong to the Ming Dynasty 
(1 368-1 644), and the whole offers 
an unrivalled opportunity to 
become familiar with the rarest and 
the best In this particular field. 
Eskenazi, Foxglove House, 166 
Piccadilly, W1 (071-493 5464). Mon- 
Fri, 10am-5.30pm, Sat, 10am- 
1pm,Tues-Dec22. 


JANACEK FESTIVAL: A 
weekend festival celebrates aU types 
of Jan&ek's music including 
some of the reconstructed and 
unfinished works. Andrew Davis 
directs the voces of the Welsh ' 
National Opera Chorus and 
soloists mcludrng Norman BaHeylna 
concert performance of 
Jandtek's last opera From die House 
of the Dead ; the Lindsay Quartet 
recreates the programme JantiCek 
introduced to London audiences 
at the Wfgmore Hall In 1926; and 
the BSC Symphony Orchestra 
wHI perform Jan&ek's Sinfonietta 
and some of his rarely heard 
dioral music 

Barbkan. Silk Street, London 
EC2 (071 -638 8891). Jan 1 5-1 7. 


4 r«H 
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U2'S ZOOROPA "93 TOUR: The 
group's British dates are as follows. 
Celtic Park. Glasgow (041-227 
551 1), Aug 7. Wembley Stadium 
(071-3444020/081-900 1234), 

1 1, 12. Roundhay Park. Leeds 
(0532444600/445505/ 
476962/442999), 14. National 
Ground, Cardiff Arms Park . 

(0222 644996/2301 30/757870), 18. 


x.riih 


THE DEEP BLUE SEA: Terence 
Rattigan's play is revived. Penelope 
Wilton plays Hester, the woman 
who leaves her judge husband for 
Freddie, a young former RAF 
pilot; Linus Roadie plays Freddie; 
and Wojtek Pszoniak is a 
mysterious neighbour. Film director 
Karel Reisz returns to the 
Almeida to direct following his 
success with The GigR Concert 
Almeida Theatre, Almeida 
Street. N1 (071-359 4404). Previews 
from Jan 6; opens Jan 12. 


LA BOHEME: Scottish Opera .. 
revives Elijah Mashinsky's production 
of the Puccini opera. Peter 
B render, principal tenor with the 
Welsh National Opera, makes his 
company debut in the role of 
Rodolfo, joined by Bolshoi 
soprano Katerina Kudiavdienkoas 
Mimi. Caroline S barman directs. 
Theatre Royal, Hope Street, 
Glasgow (041-332 9000), Jan 14, 
16,20,22, 26. 28; Feb 3, 6, 9, 
11,13. 


GOOD ORATORY: Marking the 
publication of The Penguin Bookof 
Twentieth-Century Speeches, 
Michael Foot, Brian MacArthur and 
Matthew Parris discuss the 
changing nature of oratory. 
Waterstone’s BookseBera. 9 
Garrick Street, London WC2 (071- 
836 6757). Tues, 7pm. 


Film: Geoff Brown; 

Theatre: Jeremy Kingston; 
Oasskal Music and 
Opera: Ian BrurtskW; Rock and 
^ Jazz: Stephanie Osborne; 
Dance: Debra Crafne; 
Exhibitions: John Russell 
Taylor; Video: Geoff Brown; 
Bookings; Kari Knight 


Answers from page U 
SPLORE 

(b) A frolic, merrymaking, rerei, caroosd, Scottish dUec*. d 
obscure origin; Borns: “A merry core/in Poosfe Nawyfe hdd the 
splore.” 


'Stir 4h,1 


MIXOLOGIST 

(a) One who is skilled in the mixing of drinks, a faoetioos America* 
pert m ao tea e “Who ever heard of a man's «lfh>g the bnrk«P* r * 
mixologist of tiykahr fixings?” 

SUBRISION 

(b) The act of s m il in g, from the Latin sabridat to sa3e* to** H 

hash* hot not quite, which is the facet of the nfc “In the »d 
aqoying a gentle sabrisioa. 7 ' “This half-hearted and soms*** 
sabrisdw denial.” * - - 


HELVE 

OQThc handle of a tool or weapon, or. as verb, to em^P with* 
from the OE kktfe: “By twisting a withe of Hickory roraid the* ®*; 
they make a helre, and so cat and bruise the bark round the « 


CROSSWORD ENTHUSIASTS: For mail order detaih ofaHTimJ 

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SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


OUT OF TOWN 



I must forsake the tractor, and plough my furrow alone 


t never pays to go to plough 
with a heavy heart. The farrow 
is too narrow to accommodate 




human regret and remorse; it has 
its work cut out even to find room 
for the large feet of die cart-horses. 
They have their moods, too, when 
ploughing, but it only ever seems to 
be willingness or idleness. I can 
never detect in the horse's attitude 
that he has much going through 
his mind other than thoughts of 
getting back to his manger. 

That is not to underestimate his 
intelligence, for a good plough- 
horse is a clever beast. He knows 
precisely where to walk, when to 
tum. where to pull, while sensing 
the mood of the man steering the 
plough. Well, I must admit that my 
cart-horses have had some pretty 
glum moods wafting in their 
direction this ploughing season, 
and if f have appeared in any way 
ungrateful for their gargantuan 
efforts. I apologise. 


Jhe ploughing has been 
gnm this year. We have 
heen deluged with nun on 
a scale I have not witnessed 
in ray short farming career. 

And ditches have become 
|^Smg torrents, rainwater 
hangs in puddles in the 
hoofprints left by the hore- 
es, the sheep are turning meadows 
mto quagmires. 

After the long drought, the rain is 
welcome. But its effect on the 
ploughing has been disastrous 
because the soil is so wet that it has 
ceased to behave like soil should, 
and has taken on the texture of an 
over-moist Christmas pudding. 
Consequently, in the same way that 
a gooey pud sticks to the spoon, the 
earth is dinging to the plough as 
though its life depended on it: and 
even if it relinquishes its clinch on 



the breast it will not fall 
away as a well-behaved 
slice of soil should. Instead 
of collapsing neatly against 
the previous furrow, it 
stands stubbornly upright 
heavy, moist and immov- 
able, so that the fall weight 
of a boot against it is 
necessary to get the cursed earth to 
lie down. 

What makes this depressing for 
the ploughman is the thought that 
for aO his efforts to get horses and 
plough repeatedly along the field 
(I walk II miles to plough one 
acre), he might be wasting has time. 
For die purpose of ploughing is to 
tuck avray last season's soil and 
bring to tiie surface fresh earth in 
which to plant the seeds. This trick 
works only if the plou ghman turns 
the land completely: if he merely 



stands it on end, as I seem to be 
doing, last year’s crop wifi grow 
again, along with a flourish of 
weeds. Disaster for the organic 
fanner who has no chemical reme- 
dy to check unwanted regrowth. 


I am doing my best, and so are 
the horses in what is turning out to 
be a strenuous phase of the year. 
But there are areas in which I have 
not done my best, and I am paying 
the price. The field 1 am now 


ploughing grew wheat and oats last 
year. The wheat was successfully cut 
with our binder, a lightweight 
device compared with a modern 
piece of farm machinery. But 1 was 
not so lucky with the oak. A rain 
storm in July flatte ned them, 
making cutting with a binder a 
near-impossibflity. 

So my neighbour brought his 
combine-harvester, then his tractor 
and heayy trailer to take the grain, 
then a bigger tractor and baler to 
gather the straw, and finally an- 
other trailer to can the bales. 1 pay 
the price every time my plough hits 
that patch of land, because where 
the un-pressured wheat grew, we 
fling the soil aside with the ease of a 
child playing in a sandpit, but as 
soon as we meet the strip where the 
oats grew, the horses groan and my 
hands can hardly keep the plough 
on course through the compacted 
earth. 

Old and new technology cannot 


Free love in 
the turkey yard 

Robin Young finds a farmer making a lot of birds very 
happy — at least until they meet their end at Christmas 


be mixed. A heavy tractor sprinted 
along one of our farm tracks re- 
cently and left tuts so deep that as 
soon as they freeze they will be sure 
to make a horse stumble. He was 
doing a job the horee could easily 
have done had I found time and 
made the effort Now the trade is a 
sony sight and will stay that way 
unfa spring. By contrast the field 
from which we carted mangel- 
wurcels for three days solid, using 
horse and can to remove an esti- 
mated 20 tons, show no marks of 
anything having been across it 
Every time I trudge the fanow, I 
bitterly regret allowing tractors on 
the land. Their speed and power 
does not compensate for the scars 
they leave on this little farm. Every 
farrow makes me want to pledge 
never to have one here again. But I 
doubt I have the strength to resist it 
We are not all jolly fellows follow- 
ing the plough. I am sony if 1 have 
spoilt your biscuit- tin lids for you. 


STEPHEN MARKESON 


a THIS is not 

just a story 

Jfk.W about Christ- 

mas turkeys. It 
Hr. rife * ? is also a story 

about sex, 
t' drugs and rock 

III 'n' roll, for 

,BB those are all 

factors that help to determine 
the way turkeys are raised for 
the Christmas table. 

Sex is something most mod- 
em turkeys know nothing 
about, because breeding poli- 
cies have made the “stags" so 
big-breasted that they are 
physically unable to mate. 
The hen, mounted by a mod- 
em leviathan of a sexually 
mature male bird, cannot take 
his weight and collapses. The 
stag, unable to reach her. no 
matter how he tries, gets over- 
excited and is liable to die of a 
heart attack. 

Even when turkeys do mate 
normally, the success rate in 
fertilising and hatching the 
eggs is only about 20 percent 
Applying artificial insemina- 
tion, turkey breeders expect 97 
per cent success as normal. 
Almost without exception, 
therefore, commercially raised 
birds nowadays are the results 
of artificial insemination. 

The exceptions are just 70 
buds now under sentence of 
death at a farm near Brent- 
wood in Essex. They are the 
progeny of sexually liberated 
parents, raised by Kelly’s Tur- 
keys of Danbury, Essex, to the 
special order of Richard Guy 
of the Real Meat Company in 
Warminster. Wiltshire. 

Mr Guy's company special- 
ises in ethical meat products. 
“We put the principle first and 
determine the price second," 
Mr Guy says. It follows that 
the Real Meat Company’s 
turkeys suffer none of the 
indignities, discomforts or cru- 
elties (save the terminal one) 
inflicted on their intensively 
farmed counterparts. 

Most turkeys are factory- 
farmed, like broiler chickens. 


Others are pole-farmed, which 
means that the birds are kept 
in a shed but allowed natural 
light and some room to move. 
Factory and pole-farmed birds 
have their beaks trimmed, or 
removed completely, to stop 
them pecking each other to 
bits. “Turkeys are naturally 
very active," says Mr Guy. "If 
they are not let out into the 
open early in life, they get 
bored and irritable and start 
peeking each other.” 

Mr Guy’s birds do not have 
to undergo “de-beaking” or 
“beak-trimming" because th^ 
range freely. At liberty to roam 
over a field pecking at stones, 
weeds and fence-poles, they 
feel no need to pick bits out of 
each other. "If you see a bird 
described as bring free-range 
with a trimmed beak," he 
says, “you know the descrip- 
tion is not to be trusted. The 
two are pretty well a test for 
each other. Fully free-range 
birds have complete beaks.” 

Nor do Mr Guy's turkeys, 
raised for him at Brentwood 
by David BeanlandL live on 
drags. Most modern turkeys 
do. No fewer than 24 drags 
are routinely added to turkey 
"starter crumbs" and feed to 
promote growth and to inhibit 
diseases. The turkey’s phar- 
macopoeia is, in fact, more 
liberally stocked than that for 
any other farm animal, 
although the labels advise 
producers to withdraw medi- 
cated feeds at least a few days 
before slaughter. 

The Real Meat Company is 
one of relatively few free-range 
producers that abjure all drugs 
and feed additives throughout 
the birds’ life. "I was boasting 
about this rather loudly," Mr 
Guy says, “when I was chal- 
lenged by Clare Druce of 
Chickens’ Lib, the pressure 
group. She said I would not 
have made any turkeys’ life 
complete until I allowed adult 
birds some sexual fulfilment” 

Mrs Druce does not have 
happy Christmases. She 


thinks turkey farming as prac- 
tised in modem Britain is 
barbaric. Debeaked turkeys, 
she says, experience "phantom 
limb syndrome" in the same 
way that a human who loses a 
limb can fed that it is still 
there. “It is a horrible mutila- 
tion," she says. 

On tiie other hand, she is 
unhappily aware that when 
turkeys are kept in dose prox- 
imity to each other, they peck 
each others eyes out “I have 
seen videos of factory-farmed 
turkeys cannibalising each 
other.” she adds. 

She is not much happier 
about artificial insemination, 
which happens two or three 
times a week and. she says, 
causes tiie males great stress. 

Mr Guy says he was never 
greatly concerned about artifi- 
cial insemination before, al- 
though among his company’s 
products it is only the tutkeys 
who depend on it so complete- 
ly. "Most dairy cattle are bred 
by artificial insemination." he 
says, "but we have so marry 
welfare concerns about dairy 
beef that we do not touch any 
of it So our beef is the work of 
real, live bulls. 

“Our pigs, I think, are 
almost all done by boar power, 
our sheep are still tupped by 
rams and cockerels rule tiie 
roost over the chickens. Only 
the turkeys had been missing 
out completely ” 



•••%♦/ - -v* • i 


Doing the turkey trot David Beanland checks the active, free-range stock enjoying their liberty before gracing the Christmas dinner table 


T o rectify the wrong 
that Mis Druce had 
identified. Mr Guy 
ordered some natu- 
rally generated turkeys for this 
year. They are Norfolk Blacks, 
an old-fashioned pure line 
breed that remains capable of 
coition because the stags do 
not grow much bigger titan 
151b. 

So hit-and-miss a method is 
natural copulation among tur- 
keys, though, even when they 
come from slimline breeds 
such as the Norfolk Black, that 
the marriages consummated 


among Messrs Kelly’s turkeys 
on Mr Guy’s account resulted 
in only 70 young birds: “We 
had hoped for 150," Mr Guy 
says ruefully. 

Reverting to old-fashioned 
love-making in the turkey yard 
carries its price. The premium 
price Mr Guy suggests for his 
fall-beaked, free-range, addi- 
tive-free turkeys this year is 
E3.49 a pound. The 70 birds 
that are the product of natural 
sexual union win be 5 Op a 
pound more, but at least 
people who eat them may be 
comforted by the thought that 
they helped make one old tur- 
key very happy. 

• The Real Meat Company. East 
Hill Farm, Heytesbury, War- 
minster. Wiltshire, can deliver 
naturally conceived turkeys over- 
night. at £3.99 a pound, plus a 
delivery charge (mainland UK} of 
£3.95. Orders: 0985 40436. 


Call of the gravel pit 




fjow better to explore the south 
of the great Indian sub-continent 
than aboard a ship sailing from the 
Cormandel to the Malabar coast. 

A voyage of discovery past the States 
of Maharajbtra. Karnataka, Kerala 
and Tamil Nadu as well as a visit to 
Sri Lanka with its hill city of Kandy. 

The south of India is little visited 
in comparison to the well worn circuits 
of the north, partly this is due to the 
more difficult geography but also 
because of a misinformed view that it 
is a land of dreary temple ruins. 
Nothing could be further from the 
truth. The south is wonderfully exotic 



Wk fa 

history therefore more peaceful and 
buk slab,e - “ifluenced by traders in spice 

©Kjfjjjps rather than wars. The people are 

charming and open and less influenced 
Pwtcma ZHgra p&s by western Ideology, their festivals and 
colourful lifestyles, their music and 
dance make a visit unforgettable. 

\/P D a . vs ashore in lush tropical 

p countryside will be filled with sights of 
dynamic temple architecture, impressive 
forts, reminders of Portuguese and 
British colonialism and a fascinating 
and compared well with anything the culture of a truly Hindu flavour. Such 
north has to offer. Unlike Northern journeys by air and road are iminenselv 
India, the south has escaped the ravages tiring and the benefits of a cruise along 
of invaders through the centuries, its this roast are self-evident. 




OLD flooded gravel pits 
are where birdwatchers 
should be as winter doses 
in. The alder trees along 
the shores are bursting 
with life. The alders 
themselves look quite dif- 
ferent from the bare trees 
around them:_ their 
brandies are thick with 
this year's knobbly seed s 

cones and next year’s 1 

purple catkins. / 

All seems quiet then. ** 
suddenly, the sky is fall of — 
small birds that fall into 
the alder crowns with jy 

faint, sweet calls. A flock % 

of siskins has arrived. In 
no time they are hanging , 

upside-down under the / 

cones, working away at 
them with their tough 
little bills. 

They are agile and dainty 
green birds with two distinct 
yellow wing bars. Their forked 
tails are very noticeable as they 
ding to the dark twigs. Wiih 
the sun on them, the males 
can be picked out by their 
black caps and blade bibs. 
They have all probably come 
south from Scotland, where 
they nest in the conifer forests. 

Something startles them, 
and the whole flock goes up 
with a twanging murmur. 
Then the)’ sweep around, and 
are back in the boughs again. 

But one bird looks different 
It has a gold wing bar. and its 
head is red and white. There 
arc goldfinches in the flock, 
too, a little larger than the 
siskins but almost as acrobatic. 
Mixed in the flock one may 


Feather report 








f W Ip. igy Jacques 

Agile and dainty, with two yellow wing bars the siskin 


also find lesser redpolls, much 
the same sire as the siskins 
and feeding on the aldercones 
in the same way, but brown 
with a red cap. The redpolls 
tend to separate from the other 
birds in the air and fly off with 
a hard, rattling call, unmis- 
takable once heard. 

Out on the water in the pit 
there is also plenty of life. Most 
noticeable will probably be the 
cormorants. In recent years 
they have started coming in- 
land more and more in win- 
ter. In the London docklands 
they stand on the top of cranes 
and look down at the river. In 
the country they perch on dead 
trees at the edge of lakes. 

They are large birds with 
snake-like necks and long 
beaks with a hook at the end. 


Often they open their wings to 
dry them. The wind rocks 
them when they are poised 
like this. Then they dive again, 
particularly pursuing eels, or 
they float in the water with 
only head and green eye 
showing. 

On every part of the water, 
coots plod about in an inde- 
pendent-minded way. A show 
eler drifts off cautiously when 
it notices humans. There is 
perhaps a little grebe diving 
among a stretch of water 
plants: whenever it comes up. 
it is in an unexpected place, 
and hardly stays long enough 
to show its crimson neck 
(fading as winter comes on) 
and its curiously fluffy rear. 

Black-headed gulls are 
going up and down, scream- 


ing all the time. One or 
two lesser black-backed 
gulls brood on the far 
shore, not far from a 
snipe that is sleeping 
there with its long beak 
tucked under its feathers. 
The markings on its back 
are among the most 
W beautiful of all British 

— ■ birds: the chestnut feath- 

^ eis are flecked with 

yellow, and crossed by 
long, creamy stripes. 

As the short day goes 
by. the scene changes. By 
mid-afternoon, the gulls 
are starting to leave for 
their roosts, winging 
a. lightly away in small 

© groups. Some of the cor- 

morants may be off to a 
bridge across a river, 
where they will fed safe 
from marauding foxes. Dude 
are starting their flight to other 
pook But the snipe is probing ; 
again in the mud, and small 
birds are coming in. Pied 
wagtails are dropping into the 
reed beds, linnets into dense 
bushes. 

In the dusk, a fate gull erfes. 
some wigeon that have just 
landed whistle softly. The only 
avian sound as rinrianag; takes 
over is tiie “chink, chink, 
chink" of die roosting black- 
birds. restless to the last 

Derwent May 

•Wfcafs abort: Birders — look 
out on flooded fields for wander 
flocks of teal and wfaeoa. 
Twitchers — jxed-billed grebe on 
Argal Reservoir, nr Falmouth. 
Details BirtUine: 0898 700222. 



A COAST TO COAST CRUISE AROUND THE SUB-CONTINENT UNKING MADRAS TO BOMBAY 
Visiting: Madras -Pondicherry -Rameswaram- Colombo - 
Trivandrum- Cochin - Cannamore - Mangalore - Goa -Bombay 
2-17 March 1993 Guest Speaker- Louise Nicholson 


THF. MS r.Al.FnQNIAN STAR 

After the day exploring, what 
rould be better than lo return to the 
comfort and luxury of the air-conditioned 
MS Caledonian Star for good food and 
company as we sail through the night for 
our next port of calL 

There is accommodation for up to 
HO passengers. All cabins are ‘oulsidc* 
with private shower, wc and refrigerator. 
It has a single-sitting restaurant, two 
lounges, bar. library, shop, beauty 
parlour, clinic, sun deck, swimming pool 
and plenty of deck areas for rending or 
observation. 

'J'he excellent facilities are 
enhanced by the Scandinavian Officers 
and Management which together with 
the earing Filipino crew make (he 
Caledonian Star one of ibe happiest 
and best run ships afloat. 



THE ITINERARY 

DAY I London (Heathrow)- Bombay 

DAY 2 Bombay to Madras by domestic 
flight. Embark on MS Caledonian Star 
DAY 3 Pondicherry 06.0(1 to 1200 hours 
DAY 4 Ramesw&ram 12.00 to 20.00 hours 
DAY 5 At sea 

DAY 6 At sea 

DAY? Colombo arrive 06,00 hours 
Moor overnight 

DAY g Colombo sail 13.00 hours 
DAY 9 Trivandrum 10.00 to 17.00 hours 
DAY 10 Cochin 07.00 to 18.00 hours 
DAY 11 Cannamore 08.00 to 20.00 hours 
DAY 12 Mangalore 0200 to 16.00 hours 

DAY 13 Goa 09.00 to 22.00 hour? 

DAY 14 At sea 

DAY 15 Bombay Disembark in the morning 
and dm e to Taj President For an overnight 
stay. .Afternoon excursion of Bombay 

DAY 16 Bombay -London 

Early morning flight 


PRICES PER PERSON 

Category C 2 berth £3305 

Category B 2 beds 

Category A 2 beds £2795 

Category AA 2 beds £2995 

Superior __ £311X1 

Suite 2 rooms £3795 

Single A deck £2950 

Single main deck £3200 

Single upper deck £3400 

Price includes: Fxnnomv air travel. 13 nighti, un 
MS Caledonian Star on full board. M night* at 
ihr Taj Mahal Pmideni Hotel. Bombs* on 
bmltfoi only, ahorr excursion-. with lunch attain* 
nhrre applicable. Handing, entrance Ires, 
porterage, port taxes, nerviest oFTonr Manager* 
and Curat Speakers, 

Not included: Travel insurance from £4 1.Mt. 

Indian visa, lipn to ship s cnx 

BOW TO BOOK 

far reservations and further information 
please telephone 071491 4751 


HOBLf CfllfDONIfl UrtlTfD' 


11 CHARLES STTttfT, MAYTA1R, LONDON W1X Tvm 
TELEPHONE OTt- 491 4752 WSMM 0TI-4W (££ 
2( HOUR BROOME ANSNERPHONE (OT-355 1«4 
ABTAC9A* 


- .. 






Bake your 


DIANA UEADBETTER 




cake and 


I . . »* » * % V 

f. • »' ,%%* ' »** 







Frances BisselL the Tunes cook, suggests 


some seasonal cakes that travel well 



NOT long ago, I 
received a cake 
through the post 
from a friend in 
Alabama. It was a 
Pepper Patch Orig- 
inal Tennessee 
Tipsy Cake. A rich, 
brown, moist fruit cake, as soft and 
crnmbly as a pudding, its main 
ingredient, at fust mouthful, 
seemed to be Tennessee's favourite 
sippin' whiskey, the other ingredi- 
ents were listed on the box and, 
after we had finished it I decided to 
make my own. The soft carameliy 
taste and fudge-like texture comes 
after long keeping, 1 decided, but 
mine wasn't around long enough 
to test that. 

Not having pecan or bourbon to 
hand, I used broken brazil nuts 
and rum. 1 also made the cake 
batter in the food processor, very 
quickly, as the original cake did not 
have large chunks of fruit or nuts in 
it If you plan to keep or send the 
cake, it will take even more spirit 

Cakes in the Anglo-Saxon or 
northern European tradition stand 
up well to being sent as gifts. 
Indeed, in the days of the mail 
coach, much of the baggage must 
have been made up of foodstuffs, 
exotic fruit and spices leaving 
London for the provinces, ana 
wholesome pies and cakes being 
sent by the country cousins for 
deprived townsfolk. 

Yeast-based cakes and rich fruit 
breads keep well and are sturdy 
enough to be sent by post, train or 
plane. I have travelled to the Far 
East with Christmas cake, and 
from America with my mother-in- 
law's nut roU. Here, then, are some 
cakes to make for presents, or to 
keep for Christmas. They are 
extremely easy. 

The “stolien" redpe. a German 
Christmas favourite, is excellent for 
a leisurely breakfast I rushed home 
to make one after we had been 


since home-made almond paste 
takes so little time and effort to 
make and is infinitely superior. 

The spiced bread and Christinas 
ale is a Yorkshire tradition. Serve it 
from now until Twelfth Night 
Black bun is a Scottish speciality for 
first-footing on New Year’s eve, 
when you will, you hope, open your 
door after midnight has struck to a 
talL dark stranger bearing gifts of 
coal, salt and bread. Malt whisky is 
the traditional accompaniment 
Buck's fizz with the stolien is not a 
bad idea. 





Stoflen 

3tsp/15g dried yeast 

SO oz/200ml warm milk plus pinch of 

sugar 

llb/455g strong plain flour 

l atsp/2gsalt 

U lb/ lQOg butter 

grated lemon rind 

8-I0az/230-280g mixed, dried fruit 

chopped to even size 

3oz/85g chopped almonds 

I free-range beaten egg 

Marzipan 

*2 lb/23 Og ground almonds 

tlb/1 1 Og caster sugar 

1 oz/30g melted butter 

sufficient egg white to bind together 








given it for breakfast by our friend, 
Martine. a brilliant cook and one 


Marline, a brilliant cook and one 
half of T&W Wines of Thetford in 
Norfolk. I made the mistake of 
using bough t-in marzipan the first 
time I made it a pointless short-cut 


Sprinkle the yeast on the milk and 
leave until it froths. Sift flour and 
salt into a bowl, and rub in the 
butter. Add the lemon, fruit al- 
monds, and then the yeast mixture 
and egg. Mur to a dough, and 
knead for ten minutes. Cover, and 
leave to rise until doubled in bulk. 
Knock back, and knead the dough 
for a few minutes, and roll into a 
long aval. Roll the marzipan into a 
cylinder, and place down the 
length of the dough slightly to one 
side. Fold over the dough, and 
pinch down to seal. Place on a 
greased baking sheet Cover with a 
dean, damp doth, and leave to rise 
in a warm place for 40 minutes or 
until doubled in size. Bake in a pre- 
heated oven at 200C/400F, gas 
mark 6 for 30 to 35 minutes, until 
well risen and golden brown. 
Transfer to wire rack to cool. Dust 
with iring sugar before serving. 


Spiced bread and Christmas ale 
(makes a 2lb/approxlkg loaf) 

1 2cn/MQg plain flour 

4 Bp ground allspice 

*a gp freshly grated nutmeg 

frtsp ground ginger 

pinch of salt 

7az/200g lard, butter, or 
sunflower margarine 
7oz/200g light muscovado sugar 

2tsp baking powder 

2 Bp dried instant yeast 
1 lb/45 5 g mixed dried fruit 
1 free-range egg. lightly beaten 


Christmas ate 

(makes about ipU570ml) 
lpft/570mL ate, such asTheaksttm's 

2 free-range eggs 

I-2tbsp light muscovado sugar 
freshly grated nutmeg 


lisp pure vanilla essence 
3-411 oz/85-1 1 Omi bourbon or nun 
raflk 


about 711 oz/200ml warm milk and 
water, mixed 


Sift the dry ingredients together 
into a bowl Cut in the fat. ana then 
rub it in. Add the sugar, baking 
powder and yeast, and then the 
dried fruit Mix in the egg and 
milk. Spoon info a lined, greased 
loaf tin, and bake for three to four 
hours in a low oven, preheated to 
1 50C/300F, gas mark 2. Allow to 
cool in the tin before removing, 
then wrap and store. Serve sliced 
and buttered, with Christmas ale. 


Warm the ale in a saucepan. Beat 
the eggs, sugar and nutmeg to- 
gether in a bowl. Pour the ale over 
the egg mixture, and whisk to- 
gether. Strain into a saucepan, and 
stir over a gentle heal so that the 
mixture does not curdle. Serve hot 
or cool Another version of this 
redpe can be made with mead 
replacing the beer, which is. I 
think, even nicer. 

Tipsy cake 

10oz/280g unsalted butter 


10oz/280g dark muscovado sugar or 
molasses 


Cream the butter and sugar until 
light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs 
and flour alternately. Stir in the rest 
of the ingredients, except for half 
the spirit, and add enough milk to 
give a soft dropping consistency to 
tire mixture. Grease and line a loaf 
tin. and spoon in the mixture. 
Smooth the top, and bake for two 
hours in a pre-heaied oven at 
1 50C/300F, gas mark 3. Allow to 
cool in the tin. Pour the remaining 
spirit over the cake, having poked 
holes in it with a skewer. Cover the 
cake with foil, and allow to stand in 
a cool place until the spirit is 
absorbed It will keep for several 
weeks in greaseproof and foil. 

Black bon 


Sprinkle the dried yeast on to the 
milk, and let it work for 10-15 
minutes. Sift the flour and salt cut 
in the butter, and then rub in until 
it resembles fine breadcrumbs. Mix 
in the yeasty liquid, and knead it 
until smooth on a floured work 
surface. Place the dough in an oiled 
bowl cover with a dean tea towel 
wrung out in hot water, and put it 
to rise in a warm draught-free place 
until doubled in size. However, as 
with any yeast baking, if it suits 
your timetable better, let it rise in a 
cold place over a longer period 


1 free-range egg yolk 
lthsp dammed m3k 


M be the fruit spices and whisfy, 
and leave to soak while the dough 
is rising. Divide the dough into two 
pieces, one piece half the size of the 
other. Flatten the larger piece on a 
floured worktop and lay the fruit on 
it Knead fruit and dough together 
until thoroughly incorporated and 


draw it together to form a bun. Roll 
out the other piece of dough to a 


Hb/455g settealsing flour 

pindiofsall 

Ulb/l I Og desiccated coconut 
6oz/170g chopped pecan nuts 
^Ib/llOg raisins 


Dough 

3 Bp dried yeast 

1 pi/ 5 80ml warm skimmed milk 


‘aisp salt 

4<Ib/340g unsalted butter 


Filling 

1 lb/45 5 g currants 

Ub/4S5g stoned raisins 
*215/2308 stoned chopped prunes 
*alb/230g chopped figs or dates 
6tfasp coaise marmalade 
*4 lb/1 f Og flaked almonds 
2tsp ground cinnamon 

2Bp ground doves 

2 tsp ground ginger 

Itsp ground cardamom 
6-8thsp whisky 


out the other piece of dough to a 
circle, large enough to enclose tire 
bun. Place the bun in the centre of 
the dough, and wrap the edges 
towards the centre. Pinch to seal it 
Line a 10-12in/25.5-30.5cm cake 
tin with greaseproof paper, and put 
the bun in it smooth side up. Cover 
with a damp tea towel, and let the 
dough prove for a further 30-40 
minutes. Pride all over with a 
larding needle or skewer, right 
through the cake. Glaze the sur- 
face, and bake in a preheated oven 
at 180C/350F. gas mark 4, for 
about two hours. 



Best of British to your door 


Stock up the 


Christmas 


larder without 


leaving home 


W here I grew up in 
Yorkshire, there was 
a village shop, as 
well as visits by the mobile 
library, the fish van from 
Grimsby, the Coop van sell- 
ing dry goods and the green- 
grocer’s van. not to mention 
the daily milk deliveries from 
the local farm. 

What happens today in my 
own comer of north London? 
A refrigerated van from an 
organic farm in Somerset 
comes every Thursday to sell 
sausages and bacon to the 
local deli and individual cus- 
tomers. The same day. a 
flower-seller from Holland 
parks his drop-sided refriger- 
ated van so you can see the 
bundles of blooms in large 
pigeonholes, a fish van from 
Grimsby calls every Friday, 
vans deliver mineral water 
every day and the milk float, 
with all the lines It carries, 
looks more and more like a 
genera] store. 

Local shops are good and 
branches of tire large multiples 
are within easy reach. Yet it is a 
real luxury to be able to buy 
food from the person who 
grows or produces it 
With efficient ma.il order 
and courier services, that luxu- 
ry is now available to alL There 
is almost no food you cannot 
get delivered to your door. 

Here are some of the people 
I have dealt with and some 
whose products I am happy to 
recommend: 


Some FLOCK wallpaper . 

(To enhance the AUTHENTIC Indian Flavour of our new Pakora.) 


Arriving home with the milkman: deliveries the old way (from the film Girdle of Gold! 


more, CarrigtwohUL co. Cork 
(010 353 21 883248). Oystere 
flown overnight from Cork to 
Heathrow: 24-hour delivery 
service. Atlantic also acts as 
agent for Chiefdale in Cork, 
which smokes distinctive At- 
lantic salmon. 


Our new Pakora and flock uaiipapcr both capture the true spirit of Indian cuisine. 
One is a crisp, substantia] potato snack with sesame seeds. 

Battered and lightly fried before being coated in sweet and spicy Brinjal pickle, 
it i* of unquestionably good taste. 

The other is not. 


] V M LEI Rill i» - C n N i t t r 


• OYSTERS: Lodi Fyne Oys- 
ters. Clachan Farm, Cairn- 
dow, Argyll (04996 217, fax 
04996 234). 

• IRISH OYSTERS: Irish 
oysters — fanned Pacific oys- 
ters or the flat, round native 
oysters — can be delivered 
within 24 hairs. Pacific oys- 
ters are available year-round. 
Prices vary according to quan- 
tity ordered. 

Cuan Sea Fisheries. Sketrick 
Island. Kiltinchy, o>. Down 
(0238 541461). Shore-KKioor 
overnight service. 

Redbank Shellfish. 140 
Tabernacle Street, London 
EC2A4SD (071-379 1 845). 

Atlantic Shellfish, Ross- 


• SALMON: The wild salmon 
season is over until next 
spring. But for those who 
cannot do without. I recom- 
mend salmon from Northern 
Ireland formed in open sea 
with strong tides and Low 
stocking levels. 

Glen arm Salmon Farm, 
Northern Salmon Company. 
Glenarm, Northern Ireland 
(0574 841691). 

Steve Downey, of Heritage 
Foods of Bristol (0275 
462676, fax 0275 462279), 
which normally specialises 
only in wild salmon, distrib- 
utes the fish in Britain. 

Simply Salmon, Severals 
Farm, Aikesden, Saffron Wal- 
den (0799 550143, fax 0799 
550039) for smoked salmon 
and other food gifts. 


Cinoo Dias. Suite 117. 1 
Lamb Walk, London SE1 
3TT (071-403 1137, fax 071- 
403 1129), specialises in 
Spanish products, particularly 
from Catalonia, including 
honeys, olive oils and cava. 
Most dealing is wholesale 
only, but saffron is sold by 
post. For £7.50, including 
postage and packing, you will 
get 4 grams. The saffron is 
good-quality, and 4 grams will 
make plenty of paellas, risot- 
tos, saffron buns and fish 
soups. 

Thoby Young, Fresh Food, 
(tel. and fax 071-402 5414). 
As the name indicates, fresh 
food is his speciality, including 
fish from Cornwall, seasonal 
British cheeses, organic meat, 
French poultry and the excel- 
lent Wild Blue pork 1 wrote 
a born recently. 


• EXOTIC FOODS Exotic 
Speciality Food. 8 Sycamore 
Centre, FeU Road. Sheffield 
$9 2AL (0742 611318. fax 
0742 617375). Retail, as well 
as mail order; unusual and 
useful cook's hampers with 
various themes, such as Japa- 
nese, Indian, Southeast Asian. 


• ORGANIC MEAT: The 
Pure Meat Company. Mail 
order (teL and fax 0345 581 
463). Specialists in conserva- 
tion grade meats. 

The Real Meat Company, 
Easthill Farm, Heytesbury, 
Warminster, Wiltshire (0985 


40501). Chicken, pork and 
turkeys from the firm’s own 
farm, as well as meat from 
farmers who follow its code of 
practice — about as far as 
possible from factory farming. 

Heal Farm, Kings Nymp- 
ton, Umberleigh, Devon 


(0769 572077. fax 076? 
572839). Anne Petch speci- 
alises in old-fashioned rare 
breeds, n on-in tensrvety reared 
with her own recipe for feed, 
which is free of hormones and 
antibiotics. 

Highland Venison Market- 
ing. Gran town on Spey. Mor- 
ayshire (0479 2255, fax 0479 
3055). sells wfld venison. 

Swaddles Green Farm, 
Hare Lane. Buckfand St 
Mary. Chard, Somerset (0460 
234387, fax 0460 234591). 
Bill and Charlotte Reynolds, 
the owners, farm organkafly- 

Goodman’s Geese, Wals- 
grove Farm, Great Witty. 
Worcester WR6 6JJ (0299 
896272). Judy Goodman 
keeps an ever-growing flock of 
free-range geese, available 
oven-ready from Michaelmas 
to Christmas. 

For more information about 
organic meat, consult foe Soil 
Association. 86 Colston Street 
Bristol, Avon BS1 5 BB, or 
UKROFS, Food from Britain, 
Market Towers, New Covert 
Garden Market, London 
SW8 5NU (071-720 2144). 
For information about cortser- 
vation grade meat, consdt foe 
Guild of Conservation Grade 
Producers at the Nation" 
Agricultural Centre, Stojnfr 
leigh, Warwickshire C™ 
2 LG. 





4 


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SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


FOOD AND DRINK 


•i i * 
. | i * 
^ | V * 



5J>, ' ; 
rs-“ 


Hotlines to the wine experts 


Let the 

merchants do 
the packing. 
Jane MacQuitty 
dials for help 


a DO NOT fret. 

With only 

Jkjr three shopping 

weeks to 
T 1 .# ' r - Christmas, the 

4 ll*J 0 f|Si£ wine trade 

i' should be able 

III 10 handle the 

selecting. 

•.wrapping and delivering of 
presents for you. 

This year, some merchants, 
desperate for eleventh-hour 
sales, are happy to take Christ- 
mas orders as late as Decem- 
ber 15. All you have to do is 
make a few phone calls and 
sign some cheques. 

Beny Bros & Rudd (3 St 
James's Street. London SW1. 
071-396 9600) is not the 
cheapest wine merchant, but 
it is reliable, so the cinnamon- 
scented *85 Chateau Talbot 
magnum (£39.65) from its 
two dozen gift parcels is not to 
be sniffed at Neither is its 
plummy ’66 Gould Campbell 
port with a lOoz jar of Paxton 
& Whitfield’s Stilton (£29.50). 
Postage and packing is £4.50 
• » an item; orders must be in by 
' December 7. 

Across the road at 61 St 
James's Street London SWI. 
lies Justcrini & Brooks (071- 
493 S721). Berry’s ajch and 
equally pukka rivals. Better 
value festive wines here in- 
dude the two-bottle Moselle 
and Claret case (£15). the six- 
bottle Muscadet and 1 lb 
smoked Scottish salmon pack 
(£49). plus the bottle each of 
own-label Sarcey champagne, 
chablis. and warming ’86 
Chateau Beaumont daret 
(£59). Prices indude delivery; 
Iasi orders December 7. 

If you are after swanky 
packages. Fortnum & Mason. 
181 Piccadilly. London W1 
(07 1-465 8666). will oblige — 
i at a price; its gentleman's gift 
box — a silver decanting 
funnel, plus the glorious violet- 
scented ’77 Taylor's port — 
costs £80. Carriage £7.50. last 
orders December 7. 

Style-conscious wine lovers 
will pul gloriously colourful 
\ine and grape-strewn silk 
waistcoats (£65) and ties 
(El 9.50) from Adnams at the 
top of their list. For a truly 
memorable gift, why not wrap 
one around a bottle of Ad- 
nams’ dassic '90 Pauillac 
(E 1 5.20). Chdteau Latour’s 
“third wine", or a sensational 
Saintsbury plum and cherry- 
layered '90 Pinot Noir Re- 
serve (£16.50)? Adnams. The 
Crown. High Street. South- 
wold. Suffolk (0502 724222). 
Charges vary; pre-Christmas 
orders before Daember 1 5. 

Buying presents for men 
can be difficult Try Dow’s 
1 1 970 vintage port plus a pack 
of Momecristo tubos agars 
(£75 from Comey & Barrow. 

1 2 Helmet Row. London EC I 
(071-251 4051). Delivery 



- And bring me wine”: Alan Perry, foreground, and Peter Gunn, ceDarmen for Beny Bros & Rudd in London, selecting stock for Christmas 


£8.20; orders by December 
14. Davidoff, 35 St James’s 
Street London SW 1 (07 1-930 
3079). has the same idea with 
half-bottles of the robust and 
excellent '87 Quinta do Nova! 
LBV. accompanied by two 
Montecristo cigars for £36.90. 

Townies should contact 
Bibendum at 113 Regent’s 
Park Road. London NW1 
(071-722 5577). forfreedeliv- 
eiy of cases within the M25 
area, as well as in Yorkshire 
and surrounding counties. 
Best festive bets here indude 
the fruity Lonsdale Ridge Aus- 
tralian fizz at £3.99 and 
Bibendum's own-label Veuve 
Delaroy champagne at £8.99. 
Last orders December 22. 


A s usual. The Wine 
Society. Gunnels 
Wood Road. Steven- 
age. Hertfordshire 
(0438 74022 2). offers the best 
festive collection. But you must 
be a member. If you hurry an 
application through before 
Christmas, you might acquire 
the Society's Celebration Case 
(£23). with its rich, nutty ’82 
Celebration White Burgundy 
and smoky ’85 Celebration 
Red. Or what about phim 
pudding and a bottle of a 
Muscat St Jean de Minervois. 
(£! 5)? Nobody will be disap- 
pointed either with two bottles 
of the society’s splendid, aged 
own-label champagne — Al- 
fred Gratien's ’88 vintage — 
due to rise in price in January. 
Prices quoted indude delivery, 
last orders December 7. 

Scrooges should seek out 
Lay & Wheeler’s *92 gift pack 
selection, whose plummy dar- 
et. port and zesty champagne 
own-label trio (£27.60) looks 


more generous than the price 
tag. as does the firm’s Christ- 
mas table trio (£19.95). This 
offers tiie fine, musky '89 
Chateau B rondeau daret, a 
smoky, buttery *9 1 M&con and 
the delicious, intense, nettley 
'91 Maitmborough Vineyards 
Sauvignon Blanc. Lay & 
Wheeler is at 6 Culver Street 
West Colchester, Essex (0206 
764446). Charges vary; orders 
fay December 16. 

Other keenly priced festive 
hooch can be had from Tan- 
ners. at 26 Wyle Cop. Shrews- 
bury. Shropshire (0743 
232007), whose Christmas 
daret trio of ’88 Haut 
Sodondo. '89 Roc de Mont- 
pezat and '89 La Sablidre is 
good value in a gift box at 
£20.50. as are the bottles of ’91 
C6tes du Rh6ne from the Vac- 
queyras co-op, and a *90 flbes- 
heimer Herriich Kabinett (£1 1 
for the two). Delivery free with- 
in 50 miles (outside area free 
for orders above £75), other- 
wise £6; last orders by Decem- 
ber 16. 

Yapp Bros, the Old Brewery. 
Mere, Wiltshire (0747 
860423). offers, as always, 
useful Christmas savings in- 
cluding the 12-strong party 
package containing six bottles 
of a fresh, white ’91 Sauimir 
and fruity red ’91 Gamay de 
1'Aiddche for E49, saving 
£6.50 on prices. Charges in- 
dude delivery; festive orders by 
December 14. 

After all that effort why not 
reward yourself with a fruity, 
cheny-packed magnum of '91 
Georges Duboeuf beaujolais 
in an especially Christmassy 
bottle? (Le Nez Rouge, 12 
Brewery Road, London N7, 
071-609 4711, £10.99). 


How to have your festive feast and survive it too 


Calories 
to cut 


| ON Christmas day, the aver- 
age feast er consumes more 
than 6,000 calories. The over- 
dose of carbohydrates and 
saturated fats diverts blood 
from the rest of the body to tire 
over-strained stomach and in- 
testines. creating a lethargy 
that saps energy which might 
otherwise have been used in 
exercise to work off the effects. 
The liver, probably already 
working overtime filtering al- 
cohol, is supposed to be 
making bfle to process fats 
arriving in the small intestine. 
No wonder the merrymaker 
feds dreadful. 




O? \ 

m. 

V7 




• You can mitigate the conse- 
quences. Roast the turkey and 
potatoes in olive ofl. rather 
than lard. Be selective about 
trimmings: fresh cranberry 
sauce' good, chipolatas bad. 
Why add to waistlines by 
thickening the gravy? 

• Cut the fax further by mak- 
ing a Christmas pudding 
without suet butter and flour 
add extra wholemeal bread- 


pStf nf 


Sp arkling, Spring Wat er 

With Pure Apple Juice 


Attar PierBHt, 
everything els* is i»st water. 


crumbs, fruit nuts, eggs and 
alcohol instead. Branch' added 
to a hot pudding and ignited 
is healthier than brandy butter 
or mm sauce. 

• Mincemeat need not con- 
tain butter or suet either, and 
you can dispense with the fatty 
pastry case too: simply bake 
hollowed apples stuffed with 
mincemeat instead of making 
conventional mince pies. Try 
buttermilk rather than cream. 

• Clear the Christmas buffet 
of cocktail sausages, pates, 
gala pie and coleslaw. Bring 
on smoked salmon, haddock 
and eel; pickled herrings with 
chopped onions, dill or mus- 
tard sauce; finely sliced hams 
such as Parma, San Danide. 
Bayonne, jamon de Serrano. 
Black Forest or Tirolean 
Speck, and vegetable delica- 
cies such as artichoke hearts, 
dried tomatoes, baked sweet 
peppers and mushrooms d Id. 
Crecque. 

• If you do eat and drink too 
mudi, eat before you drink, 
and intersperse alcoholic 
diinks with non-alcoholic 
ones. Good arid-blocking 
rimgs are available, and after 
a blowout, a raised bedhead 
helps to prevent stomach add 
making its way up the oesoph- 
agus to cause heartburn and 
indigestion. 

Robin Young 


BEST WINE GIFTS 

• Lonsdale Ridge £3.99, Bibendum, 1 13 
Regents Park Road. London NW1 

• lay* WWIw Aampap Wri a rW I piiH 

£27.60. 6 Culver Street West Colchester Essex 


9 Lay & Wheeler Christmas table trio £1 9. 95 
9 Taman Rhine and Rhine £11.26 Wyle 
Cop. Shrewsbury 

9 1991 Georges Dabocnf Beaujotais magnum 
£10.99. Le Nez Rouge. 12 Brewery Road. N7. 


. . ■. ••.v . ' , f ■ 


FOOD SPY: SMOKED SALMON 

Hooked on the best 


SALMON, the prince of 
fishes, is kin to the proletar- 
ian herring. Both axe from a 
group known as the Iso- 
pondyli. and go bad mil- 
lions of yeais. So the her- 
ring and the salmon are 
both old enough to smoke, 
and they are" smoked in 
large numbers. 

Christmas and New Year 
is the smoked salmon sea- 
son. when our consumption 
of the delicacy leaps ten- 
fold. Smoking a 
salmon is sim- 
pie. You soak the _ vI-N 

fish in brine, Vl 1 

split it into two y* 

sides, remove the ■ ^ £■ 

spine and smoke ^ 
the sides over 
oak chippings. /JsJSfv 

The process is 
called co!d-smo- 
king, because - 

heat plays no IfaL-r 

pan in the pie- 
serving of the ■ 
fish. This is ;*$*'.-> 

achieved by the 
drying action 
and the presence ’il 

of phenols in the 
smoke. The old system was 
to hang the sides on a kind 
of monster tie-rack in a 
smoker, a shed perhaps 1 2 ft 
by Sft. For 12. 14. even IS 
hours, depending on die 
size of fish, the smoke gently 
penetrated from below. 
Modem industrial methods 
use a bigger chamber and 
tiie smoke is blown over the 
fish by machine. 

J have to declare myself a 
traditionalist; the old way 
seems to penetrate the fish 
bener. Michael Brown 


" : £§m 


'mm 

. /_ 




smokes his salmon the old 
way, using wfld fish, some 
from Scotland, some from 
rivers in the West Country. 
His firm. Brown & Forrest, 
Thomey. Langport, Somer- 
set (04 5S 251520), sells its 
smoked salmon by post An 
8 oz sliced pack costs £9.25, 
an unsliced but boned 2 lb 
side E26.50. B & F also sells 
smoked ed and its smoked 
trout is a very different kettle 
of fish. It is given a sophisti- 
cated taste by 
.4 . - adding whisky 
and brown sug» 
/jar - ar to the cure. 

• '■■■•. Supermarket 

smoked salmon 
.^1 is usually excel- 

lent so long as 
it’s Scotch, or 
Scottish, as it is 
usually* called. 
The Canadian 
version, usually 
Pacific salmon 
i from British Co- 

lumbia. is cheap- 
Couc^ hut it is not 
VT quite smoked 

salmon as we 
know it. The 
taste and texture are differ- 
ent; perhaps it should be 
renamed. It is good, 
though, in cooked dishes. 

Sainsbuiy’s does two 
styles of Scotch smoked 
salmon, both really good. 
The standard version is 
£12.60 a pound at the 
delicatessen counter; its Isle 
of Skye smoked salmon 
costs £7.4 S for an 8 oz pack. 

Frank Jeffery 

• See facing page for more 
smoked salmon suppliers 





Litre for the price of a bottle. 

Al Victoria Wine this Christmas you’ll gel a litre of medium sweet, crisp dry white or fruity red 
for just £2.99 - the price of a bottle, save 90p. Don’t miss out though- or you'll wine, wine, wine. 

Three cheers for value. VICTORIA WINE 


Ofa Sited booster lhM Janay 4#i 1991 


B/ tow we at sol ekmd to s?l atom: *m*s a? perar under U yen rf ag? 











SHOPPING 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 




Fillers for under a fiver 



' x ^ ^ „ ; . a 

♦. 7 ,.. -y, ;.?■ 





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Send choque/po for £29- 
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LwhIod WIN 7PD 
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O 0 L guarantied (or Xmat 




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mA 

BV\ 


















SATURDAY DECEMBER S 1992 


AFTER DARK/RITES OF PASSAGE 


7 



Office 

party 

animals 



Where will the best Christmas bashes be 
held? Anywhere, except in the office — 
and the wackier the ven ue, the better. 
Sebastian Goetz and Peter Brown join in 


1 




III 


A RECESSION? A 
slump? No. no, it’s 
December now. 
and high time to 
loosen belts that 
have been tight- 
ened all year. Time 
to put on a silly hat 
and pull a cracker 
at the office Christmas party, 
where, according to a survey by 
Alfred Maries, a quarter of all office 
relationships take wing. 

But where to hold it? The only 
place that's out of court is the office 
itself. That apart, anything and 
anywhere goes, and the zanier the 
better. No theme has been left 
unturned by party organisers, no 
hall left empty tty owners desperate 
to turn a seasonal shilling. 

; Some venues 

• come as no sur- 
prise. You can 
have a steamy 
time at the Kew 
Bridge Steam 
Museum (wear 
your boilersuit). 

You can sip 
bubbly in 
London Zoo’s 
aquarium. But 

the Imperial War Museum? Yes: 
thrill at Christmas to a “Blitz 
Experience". To the sound of 
falling bombs and air-raid sirens, 
surrounded by searchlights, revel- 
lers are invited to run downstairs to 
mock bomb shelters. Seats vibrate 
to the surrounding rumblings. The 
party-goers emerge, accompanied 

v by ARP wardens, into scenes of 

* bombed out London, where, pre- 
sumably, they sing defiant carols. 

Even if the personnel manager's 
budget does not stretch that far — 
and companies can spend £50 tax- 
free on each employee at Christmas 
— the museum’s miKtaiy surround- 
ings alone offer plenty of opportu- 
nity for regression into childhood 
fantasies. According to Suzanne 
Costello, who organises special 



events there — and the museum 
has played host to such companies 
and organisations as BP and 
Friends of the Earth — people have 
sudden urges to pilot planes which 
are suspended from the ceiling, 
and occasionally they try. They also 
get stuck in tanks. 

Many are the hazards of a cool 
yule. At a hypnotism party one 
woman, led to believe that her 
colleague had just pinched her 
bottom, turned round and 
whacked him on the skull with the 
heel of her shoe. Result six stitches. 
Hardly surprising that party 
organisers have to be insured up to 
the eyeballs. 

Themed parties, increasingly 
popular, hold their own dangers. 
The managing director who fan- 
cies himself as 
John Wayne at 
a Wild West 
event should 
know that it is all 
too easy, appar- 
ently. to break 
your coccyx on a 
mechanical 
bucking bronco. 
A famous adver- 
tising agency re- 
putedly held a Christmas party at 
an ice-rink at which several limbs 
were broken. The agency has 
declined to confirm or deny the 
rumour, but there are dearly 
dangers in being legless on ice. 

Some groups have a natural 
entrie to the top party places. The 
parliamentary press corps Christ- 
mas shindig has been known to 
end with children running all over 
the Chamber, even sitting (don't teO 
tiie whips) in the Speaker’s chair. 

Others less fortunate can im- 

E the look of their venue by 
j an organiser. They can 
choose between a Viennese Christ- 
mas (string quartets, trees decorat- 
ed with pomegranates and tartan); 
a Russian Christmas (stuffed bears, 
snow machine, vodka, balalaikas); 


PAUL HEATON 



JoDy good company; staff of The Times behaving themselves unusually weD under the royal gaze last year at Madame Tussaud’s 


and a Speakeasy Christmas (sky- 
scraper backdrop). For Reuters, the 
international news agency, a cater- 
ing firm called The Moving Venue 
recreated a newsroom for a black 
and white Christmas — video 
screens, monochrome films, huge 
newscuttings all over the walls. 
Now wouldn't you think they'd 
want to get away from all that? 

Others stretch their themes with 
a vengeance. The Arc advertising 
agency will be in carnival mood in 
Chalk Farm this year with a South 
American nine-piece jazz band, two 
roulette tables and croupiers, a 
black female Santa and a Salvation 
Army band. 

Some people see children as 
party poopeis. For those who do 
not, there are many opportunities. 


Staff at BBC’S QED pro g r am me 
this year wd be taking the Santa 
SpedaL a one-and-a-quarter-hour 
ride on the Kent & East Sussex 
Railway from Tenterden station to 
Northiam and bade Father Christ- 
mas and his band of pines make 
their way down the train visiting 
each chflri and dishing out gifts. 
Grown-ups get sherry and mince 
pies, and there's a specially 
equipped coach for disabled 
passengers. 

Imperial College. London, runs 
a huge parly for staff and local 
families each year. “It's half party, 
half craft fair, very hands-on." says 
Georgina Kemp, one of the 
organisers. “Children make kites or 
Christmas wreaths, and there are 
science stalls where they can experi- 


ment and take something away, or 
race aeroplanes or cars. There are 
students and lecturers on hand to 
help with vdiizz-bangs. Adults get 
glunwein . " 

Aided by their latest skeleton, 
invariably called Charlie, the medi- 
cal students at St Mary’s Hospital, 
Paddington, also provide the child- 
ren with anatomy lessons, a timely 
reminder for the adults of the 
dangers of Christmas party-going 
generality. 

Charlie would presumably enjoy 
himself at one of the nudist parties 
organised by Mark Wilson of 
Eureka! in Kent People, he says, 
come from all over the country. 
“We are the only dub to call 
ourselves ’nudist’. All the others call 
themselves naturist and put their 


dothes bade on as soon as it gets 
dark or cold." 

There are obvious physical dan- 
gers here, though not one suspects, 
much sexual harassment an annu- 
al Christmas party problem and 
one which some companies these 
days warn their employees about 
and insure against As Roger 
Vincent head of legal services at 
Domestic and General one of the 
underwriting insurers, said last 
yean “People will have to learn to 
take their hands off bottoms." 

At some venues decorum is 
essential The smashing of priceless 
artefacts in the Victoria & Albert 
Museum’s Chinese. Japanese, In- 
dian. Islamic and costume galler- 
ies, which can be opened for an 
extra fee, would not be welcome. It 


Party lines 

■ The Kew Bridge Steam 
Museum: contact Lesley Bossine, 

081-5684757 

■ London Zoo: contact 
Simon Carpenter, 071-586 3339 
■The Imperial War 
Museum: contact Suzanne 
Costello, 07 1-4 16 5394 
■The Moving Venae Anna 
Wiggleswonh, 071-924 2444 

■ Santa Special: bookings 
can be made on 05806 6428 

■ Eureka!: contact Mark 
Wilson. 0474 704418 

■ Victoria A Albert Museum: 
contact Alida Robinson, bead of 
special events. 07 1-938 8366 

■ Madame Tnssand’S: 

contact Alun Roberts, banqueting 
manager, 071-935 6861 
(ext. 218] 



is perhaps not surprising that V&A 
Christmas parties can be themed 
around the Victorians and their 
unimpeachable morals. 

Madame Tussaud’s entered the 
party business when Jeff Banks was 
courting Sandy Shaw and wanted 
to organise a twenty-first birthday 
party in the Chamber of Horrors. 
The gallows made an excellent 
stage for record decks, and the 
waxwork museum has not looked 
bade since. 

The Times, which has formerly 
caroused at the Imperial War 
Museum and the Lloyd's building, 
win be holding its Christmas party 
at Madame Tussaud’s this year, as 
last It will finish at midnight, 
unlike that held by the Scotch Malt 
Whisky Society, which begins at 
3pm on December 1 3 and ends on 
some unspecified date thereafter. 
The invitation: "Three o’clock at 
the Vaults on Dec 2 3, It’s a hoolie 
we’re haein, no’ greetin, Bring a 
freen* an* some wine. And carouse 
tin yon time. But wear anething red 
— an’ no cheatin!” (Translation: 
hoolie/party. gree tin/moaning, 
freen/friend). The main drink is 
obvious, though there is also plenty 
of everything else. 

Hangovers? The Welsh have an 
answer. In the remote Gwaun 
valley in Dyfed. vfllagers have not 
yet recognised the Gregorian calen- 
dar, preferring an earlier version. 
They celebrate Christmas on the 
usual date, but greet the New Year 
(Nos Galon) on January 13, thus 
giving themselves plenty of recov- 
ery time, though both, according to 
the Fishguard police, are “just an 
excuse to get pie-eyed”. 

Pie-eyed? At a Christmas party? 
Surely not 


i - 


Haunted by ghosts of Christmas repasts 




i ) 







t 



A 
& 


hi 


SOMEBODY, 
somewhere may be 
dreaming of a 
white Christmas 
but I’m dreaming 
of a presentless, tur- 
keyless, tinsel-less 
Christmas. Every 
year about this time 
iave the same recurring night- 
ms it involves going to the 
jntry on Christmas Eve and 
coming aware that I have not 
ide a single preparation. There 
r no stockings for the children, 
presents, no food, no decor- 
uns, nothing. It is the mother of 
anxiety dreams and may well be 
owing at a pillow near you 
tween now and December 25. 
Between the oblivion of infancy 
d serenity of antiquity there are 
reral ages of Christmas anxiety, 
ifldren worry about the number 
d quality of presents and wheth- 
F other Christmas wifi fit down 
; chimney’. Lovers are distracted 
romance and are tormented 
her by separation from the loved 
e or tty having to share them 
th their relations. 

\fler a certain age there is the 
xiety of being a relation and later 
il you can cause a lot of anxiety 
being a difficult old relation, 
m middle years, however, are the 
itage years for festive anxiety. It 
in these middle years, between 
ing an irresponsible youth and a 
mplaining old body, that you 
vc to drive the engine of Chnst- 
is; you plan it. you pay for it, you 
,d yourself doing Christmas. 

For some people, the strain of it 
is too much and they go slightly 
id. I have a friend tallied Poppy 
io. having no living parents, 
ys with her husband's family 
ny Christmas. Last year, she and 
r husband were startled, late on 
uistmas Eve. to hear a terrible 
riek coming from the direction of 
? kitchen. Rushing to the source 
the noise, they found Poppy’s 
Kher-in-law weeping disconso- 
ely over the turkey she had been 
pparingfor the oven, 
apparently, for the first time tn 
kxld years the butcher had sent 
s bird without its giblets, and the 
happy woman could see no 
ssibilitvof making gravy without 
Diets. The prospect of a gravykss 
iristmas dinner was too awful to 
ntemplatu. . 

The upshot was that Christmas 
liming found Poppy and ner 
isband driving around the de- 
led Northumberland country- 
le looking for giblets. Eventually 
sy spotted a live chicken and hav- 
g. with difficulty, tracked down. 
? farmer who owned it, bought it 


You know you Ve reached adulthood when parents and children descend on you and 
expect you to mastermind Christmas. Sue Crewe examines a stressful tradition 



With further difficulty they per- 
suaded him to wring the creature’s 
neck, and returned home with 
gravy-making bits. 

Apart -from illustrating that 
{aimers will do just about anything 
for hard cash, this story shows how 
immutable are the rituals of Christ- 
mas and how burdened we can be 
by their observance. 

The first Christmas away from 
home can provoke the most pierc- 


ing anxiety. We are affronted by 
change; by not having a stocking 
writing on the end of the bed. Even 
a failure to blend chestnuts with the 
Brussels sprouts can be upsetting. 

The way other people decorate 
their tree or hang up their cards 
can make them seem very alien. 
Whereas one’s own family is char- 
mingly warm and informal our 
presents to each other original and 
eccentric, other people’s families 


are more likely to be insufferably 
rowdy and their presents of re- 
cycled gardening books the last 
word in meanness. 

Janine di Giovanni, an author 
and foreign correspondent, wifi be 
in Sarajevo this year— the first time 
ever she has not spent Christmas 
with her family. Sensing the festival 
gathering momentum gives her “a 
nagging feeling”. She tells herself 
to “stop bring such a baby” and 


that “you can’t sit in front of the 
Christmas tree drinking hot choco- 
late with your family for ever”. 
When she broke the news, her 
mother said in "a kind of little 
voice, ‘well miss you very much, it 
won’t be the same without you’ “. 

A male friend will not be going 
home for Christmas because last 
year, newly divorced and childless, 
the old familial patterns were 
reproachful “Christmas is about 


marriage and children, and I’d 
failed. I thought the family Christ- 
mas would cherish me but I felt 
lonely: if your private life is not 
good it can be very painfuL" We all 
subscribe to the notion that Christ- 
mas is for children, but they are 
relatively easy to make content 
compared to the mass of anchorless 
adults for whom Christmas is the 
focus of an anxiety that has been 
welling up since late summer. 

For me, the first time I felt an 
adult was when my mother came to 
stay at my house for Christmas 
rather than us going to hers. I 
staggered under the responsibility; 
it was the apogee of my Christmas 
anxiety. I wanted it to be a magical 
time for my children and stepchil- 
dren, I wanted to comfort my re- 
cently widowed mother. 1 wanted 
to be Mother Christmas to the 
whole world and carve a tradition 
of our own that we could forever 
turn to for reassurance. 

So I reproduced the holly gar- 
lands and lethal milk punch of my 
childhood, I herded a surprised 
household off to midnight mass 
and sat them down to listen to the 
Queen’s speech. We had the neigh- 
bours in and went out carol sing- 
ing; the dog wore a red satin bow, 
and in a moment of exhausted frus- 
tration, I threw the roasting pan 
out of the window into the garden 
rather than wash it up. 

There were several Christmases 
like that and I think they make a 
happy etching on our collective 
memory plate. But rircumstances 
change, arid this year both my chil- 
dren wiD be in India and their sib- 
lings scattered- It is the first Christ- 
mas that we have chosen to be 
apart and, suppressing a wild urge 
to jump on a plane to Calcutta. I 
will content myself with sending 
out two stockings. My daughter, 
aged 20, is relieved about that 
because she does not think 
Christmas will be Christmas with- 
out one. She will open it slowly and 
deliberately, making her long- 
suffering brother pay attention to 
each and every thing. 

The Christmas stocking always 
has been indicative of life's littie 
benchmarks. It does not seem so 
long ago that I had to haul myself 
from a deep dawn sleep to admire 
Father Christmas's offerings with 
two tiny people squirming with ex- 
citement. Then fast year, I realised 
that I was fast approaching my 
own second childhood when 1 
found myself rattling and daller- 
ing in a wake-up-ifs-Christmas- 
moming sort of way. The lumpen 
young adults were slumbering on 
and I’d been awake since the early 
hours, eager to open a present 



Imagine 

the 

fragrance 

of 

The 

Unpeated 

Malt. 



glengoyne 

UNPEATED. 

UNPARALLELED. 






r 







GARDENING 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 19D2 


.. , i MftlK 


MY PERFECT WEEKEND 


SARA PARKIN 
Former chair of the Green Party 


Gifts for green fingers 


Where would you go? 

To the isle of Islay off the 
"Test coast of Scotland. Islay 
is the most southerly of the 
Inner Hebrides. 

How would you get Acre? 
By overnight train to Glas- 
gow and then by coach to 
West Loch Tarbert. where I 
would catch a ferry for the 
two-hour trip to the island. 
Where would you stay? 

I n my own house. Although 
I was bom in Aberdeen, the 
family connections with die 
islands are long and strong. 

I have had a House in Port 
Charlotte, the village where 
my parents live, for 12 
years. 

Who would he your perfect 
companion? 

My husband. Max. 

What essential piece of 
clothing or kit would you 
take? 

I Wellington boots and a 
swimsuit 

What medicines would 
accompany you? 

Anti-midge cream. 

What would you have to 
cal? 

Local oysters followed by 
Islay cheese. 

What would you have to 
drink? 

Local whisky and spring 
water. 

What music would you 
listen to? 

Everything from opera to 
jazz and rock. I don't have 
favourites; whether I listen 
to Mozart or the Rolling 
Stones depends on my 
mood and the time of day. 
What would you watch on 
television? 

One brief news programme 
u day because I like to know 
what's going on. 

What three things would 
you leave behind? 

My word processor, work 
and worry. 

What luxury would you 
take? 

A good French wine to go 
with the oysters and cheese. 
What piece of ait would 
you like to have there? 

The studies of hands and 
arms by Albrecht Durer 
which are in die British 
Museum: his craftsman- 
ship is wonderful 






* 


Francesca 
Greenoak on 
glamorous and 
practical 

garden ing 
accessories for 
Christmas 


Who would be your least 
welcome guest? 

There would be no guests 
on this weekend! Both Max 
and I travel a lot for our 
work and the whole point of 
the weekend is that it would . 
be just the two of us. 

Would you play any games 
or sport? 

I would do a lot of walking. 
Which newspapers or 
journals would you read? 
There would be so much 
else to do, and 1 wouldn't 
need to pick up a newspaper 
because I would have my 
daily news bulletin 
What three things would 
you most like to do? 

1. Walk to Lodi Finlaggan. 
Records suggest that this 
island in the middle of the 
ancient loch is the ancient 
seat of the Lords of the Isles. 
The chiefs of the dans 
would camp around the 
edge of the loch, and wait to 
be called to the island by 
the Lord. 2. Swim in the 
loch if it was warm enough. 
3. Sit. talking and reading. 
To whom would send a 
postcard? 

To my sons Colin and 
Douglas. 

What souvenir would you 
bring home? 

A bottle of Bruichladdich 
whisky. 

What would you like to find 
when you got home? 

An invitation to form the 
world’s first Green 
government. 

Interview by 
Rosanna Greenstreet 


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CHRISTMAS 
shopping 
would be 
much easier if 
all my friends 
and relations 
were garden- 
ers. There are 
garden gifts, 
is and practical 


m 




to suit every taste ana pocket. 
One friend of mine was 
delighted to receive a truck- 
load of manure — although 
this is not recommended as a 
surprise present ' 

I never have enough shelves 
or window sillsi so was pleased 
to find a well-made and stylish 
plant-stand that could be used 
outdoors in summer and in a 
conservatory or porch in win- 
ter. Made by Ashworth Lei- 
sure in cast aluminium, 
painted green, white or black, 
the Regency Plant Stand is 
74cm nigh with two 34cm 
square shelves for plants. 
(Phone 0282 699969 for de- 
tails of die special £85 price, 
inc p&p. for Times readers.) 

Garden furniture deterio- 
rates if kept outdoors during 
winter. Useful items therefore 
are a wooden garden table 
and bench, which fold flat and 
can be stored on matching 
brackets. (Available from the 
manufacturers, Prestige 
Garden Furniture of Bolton: 
0204 363563. Bench 43cm 
high x 31cm x 107cm, £79; 
table 73cm high x 68cm x 
107cm. £129; each set of 
storage brackets £5.95.) 

A brightly painted, wooden 
coopered Christmas tree tub in 
a traditional design, modified 
to support the tree, is a 
seasonal gift that can be used 
year after year. Red with green 
bands or reverse colours, these 
tubs are on sale at the Muse- 
um of Garden History at its 
Christmas fair today in Lam- 




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i Christmas tree tub (from 


p, garden holdall (£29.95); Adrian Chariton's willow baskets (£1 7.50); wa 
12.50); Moorcroft vases and Ranters (from about £33). Centre, open met: 


plant dome (£56.50) 


beth Palace Road, London 
SE1, from 10am-6 pm. (Large 
size 41cm, £30, standard 
23cm. £22.50, for mail-order 
add £4.50 p&p.) Also at the 
museum today, Adrian Chari- 
ton will be making willow 
baskets for home and garden, 
The flower gatherer and 


garden basket are each £1 7.50 
at the museum (add £2.50 


0263 734585). For stocking 
fillers, look out for wooden 
dibbers and a delightful 
memo board in die shape of a 
watering can (£4.99). 

Garden centres stock useful 
small presents: plastic garden 
tidies and trngs are cheap, 
cheerful and invaluable. Stur- 


design (72cm/28in high). It 
fits into a large flowerpot, but 
can also be fixed in a 
flowerbed as part of a formal 
design and costs £56.50. Or- 
ders to Reid and Waterers 
(081-572 3225, preferably in 
the next week); add £2.95 to 
cover p&p. 


The Royal Horticultural So- 
ciety Diary 1993 Is worth 
buying for the beautiful and 
accurate plant watercolours by 
the artist Dorothy Martin 
(Frances Lincoln. £9.99). 

The highly glazed Moor- 
croft pottery, which indudes 
vases and planters, is now 


available at some garden cen- 
tres. Designs indude tulips, 


anemones, buttercups and 
fruit, exquisite in themselves 
or with singlecolour flowers * 
or plants. (Small vases start at 
about £33; phone W. 
Moorcroft on 0782 214323 
for nearest stockists.} 


- .u . r *»■ 


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BEST BUYS 


WEEKEND TIPS 


dy hand tools are also popular. 
The Odell alumimum ranee is 


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wardrobes, cup boards & ebelvlna 


wardrobes, cup boards & shelving 
beech .white, black far home/ work 


Mail-order catalogue (or visit ua) 
Cube Store 58 Pembroke Rd WB 
061 994 6016 (24 hrs) also Suffolk 


The Oddi aluminium range is 
strong and good value at 
£19.99 for trowel fork and 
planter. 

Reid and Waterer’s mail- 
order catalogue offers a smart 
garden holdall with elastica- 
ted pockets at £29.95, with 
short, three-pocket bib apron 
to match for £8.95. Their 
string line with wooden pegs is 
£9.50, and traditional 
birchwood trug with brass 
rivets is £34.95. This catalogue 
also has an unusual open 
metalwork plant dome, based 
on a swirling Russian trellis 


Sixty million Europeans will 
buy Christmas trees this year 
from a plentiful supply. In 
Britain the standard Norway 
spruce should be available at 
about £1.60-£2/30 chl Bare- 
rooted and Mocked trees will 
cost about E1-E2.50 more, 
with containerised and root- 
balled trees more expensive. 
Nordmann and noble firs and 
blue spruce have less scented 
foliage but betterneedlehold- 
ing properties. All trees bene- 
fit from being kept in the cool 
before use and require regular 
watering. 



• Do mnteriobs such as 
the repair offences, walls and 


trellis while plants are in 
winter dormant#. 

• Cut canes of autumn 
fruiting raspberries to ground 
level 


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• Harvest calabrese early 
this month. 


Plentiful Christmas trees 


• Clean and service lam- 
mowers, oil them and store in 
a dry place. 

• Make sure that your 

seed order for next year is senr 
off in good time — 
especially for unusual plants. 


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Y ou will say that I have chosen a 
pretty dumb time to get into the 
property business. Things, you 
win smugly parrot off your monitory 
telly, can go down as well as up. But it is 
precisely because things can go down as 
well as up that I have got into the 
property business. 

There was a gale last night Thai is 
why the thing went down. I knew it had 
gone down as soon as I crept into the loft 
to hack this morning, because bang 
opposite my attic window, at the for end 
of the garden, there is a bare ruin’d choir 
where late the sweet birds sang, and this 
morning it was a bit more ruin’d than it 
had been yesterday: the thing the sweet 
birds had built to have something to 
sing in. possibly indeed to sing about 
had gone down. A huge nest which had 
hitherto nestled in an upper fork of my 
acacia tree was now on die lawn, 
beneath. A number of birds, moreover, 
were ambling about looking at it 
woodpigeons. blackbirds, sparrows, the 
odd magpie. Nothing special this is 
Crick! ewood. There hasn't been a tou- 
can all year. 

I could not of course, from that 
distance, tell what these birds were 
thinking. Even a major ornithologist 
would be hard-pushed, at 50 feet, to 
distinguish between avian grief, say, 
and curiosity, surprise and irritation. 
But I could see they were interested. A 
fallen nest was dearly a big event It was 
something to chirp home about. So I 
went down for a shufti of my own. The 
crowd of binds dispersed, but only to 
observe me from fence and tree and 
sundial; they wanted to know what a 
man would do with a nest Time would 
prove that they were not alone. 

It was a large nest some two feet 
across, and surprisingly heavy. Whai we 
in the property business would describe 
as a substantial detached family resi- 
dence. constructed from traditional ma- 
terials and finished to a high standard to 
suit the most discriminating taste, the 
exterior in sturdy latticed twig, die 
interior furnished with fine moss, grass 
and mud, and the whole held together 
by best spit (at least, that is what I have 
long understood birds’ nests to be held 
together with,- it is what has always, 
when the Chinese soup menu is offered, 
made me opt for won ton). 

The nest between my hands was, in 
short, an impressive artefact Much 
time, talent and effort had patently 
gone into it it was, furthermore, 
resonant with the sentimental input 


Alan Coren 


a certain height I should have to wedge 
it in a lower fork. If I wanted to relocate 



Feathering a nest 
of troubles 
in Cricklewood 


common to all domestic premises — a 
mutually besotted young couple had 
built it with their own bealcs. raised their 
offspring in it and, when love finally lost 
its battle with duty, booted them from its 
rim, to watch, weeping as only birds can, 
while the kids fluttered ineptly off to new 
lives of their own. You could not just 
bung a tiling like that on the compost 
heap. Especially as it seemed in pristine 
nidi This was a quality nest might it 
not still be a des. res. to suit lge. fmjy.? 

I came inside again and rang the 
RSPB. Oh yes, said Mr Barton, nests 
were indeed re-used, often year after 
year, getting even bigger and better in 
the process; and, what was more, some 
biros sought to return to re-use their own 
nests, provided they hadn't been taken 
over by birds of prey. He also, bless him, 
fexed me several pages of information to 
help me identify the property-owner in 
question, since different birds build 
different sons of nest in different trees at 
different heights. 

This, you will already have guessed, 
was far less help to me than the helpful 
Mr Barton intended; it left me with 
options, each of which was more 
unfat homable than the last I could, for 
example, put die nest back in the araria 
but I could not put it back where it was 
before, because they are whippy things, 
acacias, you do not want to dunb above 


it in a lower fork. If 1 wanted to relocate 
tiie nest at its former height, I could do it 
only in the pear tree. Alternatively, if I 
preferred to stay out of traction, I could 
simply shove it. shoulder height, in a 
hedge. But since I could not only not put 
it where it was before but could not even 
identify which bird had built it all these 
options boded spring trouble: the re- 
turning birds would say hallo, what is 
our home doing down here/over there, 
we are woodpigeons, what is it doing at 
blackbird height, why is it in a hedge etc, 
whereupon they would have a look 
inside and find either that blackbirds 
had indeed moved in. or that a bird of 
prey had beaten all of them to it, and 
what would the woodpigeons, if that’s 
what they were, could be magpies, do 
then? They are not buflt to have a go at a 
condor, they would probably end up 
fighting among themselves, he shriek- 
ing this is the wrong garden altogether, 
I told you we should have turned left at 
Wembley, she crying none of this would 
have happened if you’d built a new nest 
I never liked the old one anyhow, all 
them weeds ... 

They might well as a result split up. 
Destined eggs would not get laid. 
Worse, who knew, one woodpigeon 
might resign itself to living on alone at 
magpie height and end up mating out 
with some undiscriminating jay. Chaos 
theory could reign. As the result of my 
well-meaning intervention, pigeons 
might one day mutate into amphibious 
gastropods _ and hairy sparrows spin 
their webs in chimney corners. Johnny 
evolution is an unpredictable cove, look 
at the duck-billed platypus, it might well 
have started out as a variety of chaffinch 
before some Neanderthal columnist 
with more ecophilia than sense began 
splashing irresponsibly around in 
Time’s ever-rolling stream. 

It is gloaming as I write, and the nest 
is still on the lawn where I left it From 
time to time, various birds approach for 
a bit of a poke about as if wondering 
what it will fetch in today's depressed 
market or just, perhaps, looking for 
decor tips, but as for me, I remain 
fraught with indecision. There is, mind, 
an alternative course of action which is 
gradually ooming to commend itsdf as 
both recydingfy correct and at the same 
time reasonably free of interventionist 

rislcif I attached three bits of string to it, 

I should have an organic hanging- 

basket that any conservationist would be 

proud to dangle. 


1 I 






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SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


AT YOUR SERVICE 


9 


5 


I 

1 


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: i 


A dose of 
unity and 
tradition 

The first in a new series of reviews 
on where to worship in Britain 




The Queen's Chapel of the Savoy, Savoy Street. London WC2 
(071-836 7221) 

CHAPIAIN: The Rev John Robson, Chaplain of the Royal 
Victorian Order 

SERMON: Moving, modest with personal appeal** 
ARCHITECTURE: Slightly bleak but evocative** 

MUSIC: Heavenly*** 

LITURGY: Traditional Book of Common Prayer*** 
AFTER-SERVICE CARE: Hand-shake, longer than usual chat 
with clergy, sherry in the Queen's robing room first Sunday of the 
month** 


P eople whose 
faith in the 
Church of Eng- 
land as part of 
the one holy, catholic 
and apostolic church 
has been shaken by the 
general synod vote in 
support of women 
priests could do no bet- 
ter than take a restor- 
ative dose of worship at 
the Queen’s Chapel of 
the Savoy. There the 
Rev John Robson, the 
chaplain, is honest 

enough to admit he 

once opposed women 
priests because he believed in 
paternalism. He has come round. 
“It has happened under God. We 
must try to make it work.” he said, 
somewhat sadly, at the end of his 
sermon on the Sunday following 
the November vote. 

Hitherto unsuspected and enig- 
matic overtones seem attached to 
the synod's decision in this chapel, 
correctly described as a Chapel of 
Her Majesty the Queen in right of 
her Duchy of Lancaster. In the 
rousing rendition of the national 
anthem which opened the service 
we sang: “Long live our noble 
Duke”, as a reminder that the 
Queen is also Supreme Governor of 
the Church of England. 

The chapel is sought out regular- 
ly by wealthy Americans and other 
tourists staying in the many hotels 
on the StrancLIt is something of an 
ascetic shock after the opulence of 
die nearest, the Savoy, which 
overwhelms with its stylish gran- 



RUTH 

GLEDHILL 

Religious affairs 
correspondent 


deur. But the warm 
intimacy of the chapel 
and the welcoming 
smiles of the regulars 
counteract any intimi- 
dation by the architec- 
ture. On a chilly 
autumnal Sunday, the 
oil-fired central healing 
felt barely adequate, but 
I was assured by the 
chaplain that it was up 
to the luxury standards 
of the Savoy HoteL 
The chapel is an oasis 
of traditional church 
music in today's ecclesi- 
astical cultural desert of 
the tambourine. The choir of 14 
boys and six men is led by Dr 
William Cole, the master of music, 
who has been at the Savoy since 
1954. making him one of the 
Church of England’s longest serv- 
ing men in his field. Like the 
chapel. Dr Cole seems to have 
imbibed some miraculous preser- 
vative. and appears little changed 
by the passage of time. The 
worshippers on my visit were also 
timeless. Few wore hats, but the 30 
or so who were there, mostly 
middle-aged or older, had donned 
their Sunday best and travelled in 
from as far afield as Oxford. Putney 
and Wimbledon to drink from the 
regenerative spring of tradition. All 
were friendly and charming, wel- 
coming the sight of a new face. 

A member of the royal family 
might occasionally drop by infor- 
mally for worship when in London 
at the weekend, but congregations 
are dwindling. The chapel has 



Peace in the precinct of the Strand: the chapel is sought out regularly by wealthy Americans and other tourists, but the atmosphere is intimate and the regulars welcoming 


been hit by the fall in tourism, 
especially from the United States. 

Like so many attractive churches, 
it is however in great demand by 
couples wishing to tie the knot For 
historic reasons, many are disap- 
pointed. The chapel started life as 
one of three which served an 
almshouse for “pouer. nedie 
people". Built in 1512 by Henry 
VII, it was taken over by the Duchy 
of Lancaster in 1 772, and in 1 937 
became the chapel of the Royal 
Victorian Order by command of 
King George VI. As such it is now a 
“free" chapel, without a parish and 
not falling under any ecclesiastical 
jurisdiction. Couples need a special 
archbishop's licence to many there. 
Couples who do succeed in meeting 
the stringent requirements and 
acquiring one of the sought-after 
licences get a special reward: they 
meet for a romantic re-run of their 
weddings at a special Valentine 
service each February, when they 
renew their vows. Thus are many 
enticed to stay within the worship- 
ping fold. 

Historic names associated with 



Let us pray: the Rev John Robson, chaplain of the Savoy Chapel 


the chapel indude the 1 4th-century 
churchman Wydiffe. plus Chaucer. 
Samuel Pepys and John of Gaunt 
It lies in the heart of the five-acre 
Savoy Precinct, which hosted the 
1 66 1 Prayer Book Conference, an 
unsuccessful attempt to reconcile 
dissenters and low churchmen to 
the doctrine and liturgy of the Book 
of Common Prayer. 


Unusually, the chapel runs north 
and south instead of east and west 
The side and north walls are 
original, but most of the rest dates 
from 1864, when it was rebuilt 
after a fire. The roof has been 
painted to resemble the timber roof 
which perished in the fire, with an 
ante-chapel and the robing room 
for the Queen added in 1958. New 


oak panelling was also installed 
when the chapel was put at the 
disposal of the Victorian Older, but 
sadly the pulpit above which was 
attached an hour glass to help 
preachers judge their sermon 
length, mysteriously disappeared 
about tiie same time. 

T he liturgy is strictly 1662 
Prayer Book. Thus we 
acknowledged and be- 
wailed our manifold sins 
and wickedness which we. from 
time to time, most grievously had 
committed. This was a refreshing 
change from the more mundane, 
but more common. Alternative 
Service Book confession of sins 
against God and “our fellow men”. 
“The remembrance of them is 
grievous unto us: the burden of 
them is intolerable, ” we said. The 
ion may haw had the 
i and restrained appearance 
associated with mainstream Angli- 
cans, but these words were said in 
as heartfelt a manner as any of the 
more exotic confessions of personal 
salvation by the charismatics. 


The lasting image 1 retained 
from the service was that evoked by 
the chaplain in his sermon. Mr 
Robson is a friend of the Bishop of 
Gloucester, the Right Rev Peter 
BaH who has preached at the 
Savoy Chapel Bishop Ball was the 
only bishop to abstain during the 
televised debate on women priests, 
said Mr Robson: “He pulled his 
monk’s cow} over his head and sat 
in deep, profound and tortured 
prayer.” 

The prayer, hope and belief at 
tiie Savoy was that the church 
should remain united. That this 
tiny chapel, an island of Anglican 
spirituality in tiie midst of central 
London commerce, remains so 
strong must surely be a sign that 
tiie Church of England, too, can 
survive its latest upheaval, yet retain 
the strength and dignity of ancient 
tradition. 

9 Sung communion is at llam on the 
first Sunday qfevery month, and on the 
third Sunday when a month has five 
Sundays. Otherwise, it is sung matins 
followed by a short said communion. 
Members af the public am welcome. 


071-481 1920 


SATURDAY RENDEZVOUS 


EB 071-782 7828 


% i 


LADIES 


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we nave not laughed, and 
lened.- Slightly snooty, very 
personable sunny lady wishes 
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freedom Ago Inuiuuenul over 
48. goad background, cduca- 
naa. humour, integrity. London 

* West. Ptw Kcpty Box 0144 


ALL I want for Chri sti nas Is a few 
MB hugs (TLC welcome. New 
Voar ui Spain In follow?) talL 
warm, cuddly, mtunlvc. Intern- 
geviL honest. entrepreneuae. S. 
of Lake DtatncV sreka similar 
ample man. In his prune at ape. 
Box No 0194 


AMUSING. inieUlgeM. emor ram 
wauled for London dinner par- 
ties with zHUons of single 
Ti mi BB36 


ARE you my kind of guy? fm 
tanging lo meol a romantic, gen- 
uine. prof gentleman lor friend- 
info and maybe romance. 50- 
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London or Dover. To snare 
atom pood times with mlclU- 
goM. attractive, charming, fun 
loving and sexy tori. Please 
HCPty IO BOV No Q1B1 


ARE VOL nusy wuh an Inlcresl- 
ing lifestyle hut wish 10 Mure It 
with a s i m ilar professional 
female seeking a warm, 
caring relationship:' E Mid- 
lands. Pm reply box no 0168 


ARTICULATE attractive n/» 
lady, sum S'6- youthful 56 
seeks prof gem lo share fun 
cartnp retanonsldp. London 
area Reply Photo BeorNoOt 48 


ATTRACTIVE prof n/% female 
Slim S'6' 1 . Dog lover wishes lo 
meet presentable outdoing mole 
r44-56> Own interests include, 
theatre, cinema, hurserldlng. 
ballroom dancing, cooking. 
London. Berks. Surrey. Hamp- 
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Please Reply lo Box No 0072 


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LADIES 


ATTRACTIVE Monde 
woman. No children. Requires 
professional man 46+ ter 
rorapan tonsil is/ marriage. Gen- 
uine replies only, photo ptoasc 
Please Reply to Box No 0215. 


ATTRACTIVE 


•god 47 has a good sense of 
humour seeks discerning man. 
n/s. aged 48 lo 58. near MS 
Please Rooty with photo To Bov 
No 0163 


BEAUTIFUL Longhaired lady 59. 
cultured, slim, model figure. 2 
degrees, 8 languages seeks cdu- 
caiea prof. man. loyal and tun. 
sopMsttcaled. 40-66 Surrey A 
London. Photo please Box 0067 


BEAUTIFUL Chosioa woman 
seeks London or Surrey based 
professional man over SO years 
old. Reply lo Boot No 0162 


BEDFORDSHIRE attractive 5 9“ 
profciMoiial 33 n/s lady cnlovs 
travel sport seeks Mr Right 
Photo essential Please Reply lo 
Box No 0285 



An advertisement in the Saturday Rendezvous section puts you in touch with 
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NAME 

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BLONDE, dim. lively, gorgrota. 
Crcatu c/tnoinmo *>«iun, n/s. 
London Seeks successful man. 
38-62 for dining oul. moim. 
travel, view long term rrlotro.-v- 
lhlp Reply lo Box No 0094 


CAMBRIDGE 35 Unofr. 

attractive, outgoing, upper mid- 
dle class, sincere, seeks reliable, 
sensitive n/s European or 
American partner 50-38. shor- 
ing traditional family values for 
a commuted relationship. 
Please Reply lo Box No 021 1 


CHARMING Plocldo Domingo 
LoaLallke SO'tsii wauled by 
pclllte brurvMic If you like the- 
atre. music, good tcrimalion 
and are winy and seriously 
wealthy Photo loo please 
Please Roptv to Box No 01 73 


CREATIVE colourful Leo tall, 
slim, attract lie 47. embarking 
holistic career seeks balancing 
energy from spontaneous 

seif aware sensuous male, kesil/ 
London. Reply ic Box 0229 


CULTURED elegant, rail <S'9i 
slim prof brunette ac/s would 
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cated. n/s prof/business man. 
tall, attractive, pood physique lo 
share wide interests. London. 
Photo plo. Box No 0227 


EAST ANGLIAN country dwell- 
ing divorcee artist seeks com- 
pany local n/s male Young 
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sot!. Reply lo Box ho 0221. 


GLOS based lady . 37 single pro- 
fessional home loving 4 individ- 
ual. urgently needs a warm 
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Damon lo snare life & laughs 4 
make 1993 Uie besl ever new 
year. Pise Reply Box 0182 


SOCIABLE, attractive, blue eyed 
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snare imeresl Photograph. 
Please Reply lo Box V> 0240 


100X6 female vers ar tractive. 
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oiler a sincere man who has 
both strength of character and a 
relaxed altitude 1 use In 
Loudon and rnloy most normal 
Usings Including wining, din 
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tog run If you have a sense of 
humour and ore in toe mood for 
some mutual spoiling and com 
panto nsn ip. then do reply wiin 

a photo and lei no if possible 
Confidentiality ensured Please 
Reply lo Box No 0130 


GORGEOUS Businesswoman, 
very young 41. swell travelled. 
qenUc. toougmful. oemual wuh 
great ••Jew De l lire” seels tau 
similar "untied" Scottish or 
American man who spends a lot 
of lime in. or West of. London. 
Photo please to Bov No 0239 


VIVACIOUS Monde >28 and 

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romance to life London Please 

Reply K. Pas No 0149 



people rave about. 

Cosmopolitan' 

WMIMIMI 3111 

Esl& . JiaSP«S>«r A.B.U . 


LADIES 


HAPPINESS Wanted. Widow 48 
lively toletUgent and well edu- 
cated. based London seeks unaC 
toctwd man lo entoy life. Musi 
have sense of humour be kind 
and considerate like travel the 
arts good food and fun Please 
Reply to Box No 0216 


HAPPY, attractive, kind and 
mirlUvn,i lady. 36, eeefcsemna 
slasUc. presentable, open-mind- 
ed InlcUlgritf man <36-421 lo 
snare sense of humour fun and 
rating retouonshlp tLondon). 
Photo 4 141 fUSMo Box No 0220 


HUMOROUS attractive intcfll- 
grnl afTedlonaie female. 29 
single one child. Interests rating 
oul s pons- varied, would love to 
men unattached uuetogem pro- 
fesskmal compatible male 32 ■ 
37 for friendship vlj Ihr Oft tee 
af Fair Trading approved proce- 
dure of Selective Searches Per- 
sonalised Introduction 

Agencies 071 287 0955 office 
hrs or 0860 843373 isoo our 
display as to Yellow Pages ) 


LADY now single, interests the 
arts and sports would Uke lo 
meet loll iSSti Anglo Saxon. 
Celtic. Came gentleman. Photo- 
graph. returnable. please. 
Please Reply to Box No 0216 


LIVELY lady 50. Chic and aUrnc- 
Live. Varied Interests N/S. 
would like to meet an unat- 
tached mature. affectionate 
gentleman of integrity for rela- 
tionship. Photo appreciated. 
Please Reply lo Box No 01 15. 


OSLO CALL INC my name is 
Mtml. where Is Rudolph, attrac- 
tive. tashtonable English lady, 
diplomats daughter separated, 
young SO*s. artist, seeks cul- 
tured gentleman. London area, 
pen friend and company, 
exchange v hits. Many interests. 
Please rents wim photo u Bos 
No 0198 


PASSED inc grand climacteric, 
poly far Cited, ftl. indcpmdcnl 
and very prose nibble lady look- 
ing for ocblestng caring 
manfrtend S56D»h. NS. 
London Non vintage Photo 
please Box No 0158 


SELFW1LLED desirable 
39. prof, single. InwmgenL 
attractive, remfnlne. ronunnr 
desire* dynamic wealthy male 
tor paootonMe fun r el ati on trdp. 
Discretion. Box No 0171 


STYLISH Attractive sporty bru 
nette. creallvo business woman, 
511 8. looking for tall oroart 
Inletngenl charming w 
male, laic 30's, photo ph 
please Reply lo Box No 0172 


YOUTHFUL attractive widow, 
n/s. SOH. seek* cultured gentle- 
man 50/65. enjoys home. am. 
travel. Londan/SE 
Reply to Box No 0161 


WIDOW sixties, attractive. On 
trai London, fun loving. Inter 
ests an. musk, leisure ty travel, 
seeks lall. solvent pen Goman 
65-70 tor companio nship 
Please Reply to Box No 021 7 


SATURDAY 

RENDEVOUS 


AMERICANS SEEK friendship, 
romance and marriage with 
British ladles 4 gcnUotnon. an 
ages t English Row/ English 
Connection (Dopl Ri. Suite 2. 24 
Cedi Square. Margate. Kern. 
CT9 IBA 0843-290738. 
reolured on Wogon. Where 
There’s Ufa. KvJroy dr 


AN ELEGANT EVBIIkG. ParUi 
I2ih & I9to Dccrmbor 8 New 
Years Eve extravaganza. Inter- 
national Valentine Bail 13to 
Fob. 081-886 0062 or 081 886 
6147 


A PARTNER by CavrtsDnar? Hedl 
Fisher Inrroduvttam. 48 46 

Chalk Farm Road. NW1 071 
267 6086 Men 40 66 esp In 

demand. Ouabry cUenlde. 


CLASSIC Country house dinner 
parties Stngfos only No toes. 
Surrey borders 0293 371436. 


PRETTY SUM Intelligent lady 
40 s Derbyshire based seeks 
Gentleman 46-65. educated, 
solvent wtto good sense 01 
humour Photo please Reply 
box no 0166 


■COMPANY", a flourish tog long 
oublidM Social Croup far 
unattached professional poopie. 
40* Nan -prof! booking. 

Amersnam 0494 722663. 


SARA EDEN 

Doni (ease jroar lo*e tile 


V Ju’re attractive, successful and 
imrUignti opd you Care about 
the tjpe of people tou roeei. 
CHOICE r tot CHANCE is an 
offer 91 SARA EDEN.. Come 
and see t<x younelf- 

WINDSOR 
(0753) 830350 

'BroMtifal fneudtkipr rum hmrt! 
Dafly Mafl. 

Member .LB I A 


DREARY 

DECEMBER 

Vill be eaioyiiig the festive 
season and looking forward 
10 ihe New Year. 

WiU You? 

Personal Introductions snd 
Enchanted Evenings 
for attractive 
professional people. 

Please call 
Cheryl Brown 
071 371 S535 


ilMO 



THE DINNER CLUB 

SliufadwligM upnterktt 
rmamne thr o ug hout 
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WE ASS NOT A DATING AGENCT 
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THEPfCTWtE 
DATING 
AGENCY 

CWUSTMAS MSTWGS 
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m idiva ponoftdl inteJaidton 
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ThoPksvaoD uW v g id vo ubtNs*** 
Capitol Bodibr 

Par dotaUacoU 

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081-397 IBM Inytfaual 
2* Vlfflgra *t. WCS 


SATURDAY 

RENDEZVOUS 


1800 

cultured Cxeeh 8 Russian ladle* 
320 on video. S 
rtag* mlndod i_ 
lured BBC TV. TVam. AnNBk 
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tached. almost cert ain l y the 
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SINGLES DINNER Partlea tn 
Yorkshire mmsurubw tntro- 
dUCBOr tt . Leada 0632 704808 


THAI HUAI Marriage totroduc- 


eoucalad That ladlaa. 
071 350 1261 


IN Town tonlpii Sol Bth super 
KnletiMbndge Partyt Cred / 

Proh 26-46' 071 686 6789 


JEWISH Dinner Partlea. 19 Dec 
* 14 Feb. Htgnobto. BOOK Now. 
angle 36 - 50, Td 081-422 
4241/456 0029. 


MAKS new Crtendsl A very civi- 
lised group of people raecs every 
Wednesday tn CNawtck m soa- 


Wby not Mg vb? 081 741 B15t 


Wo ar 
people of all age* meeting each 
other at Christmas portkrs. on 
watta. theatre trips, weekend* 
away and otto on a one lo one 
b»«» Ring for the brochure 
Head Draco 1023741 71704. 
1025741 21619 10832) 446186. 
lOBIl 567 6528. IO*Xl 221 
1090. 108691 38801. £0273) 
776578. <02861 831899 or 
1021 1472 1968 Not a marriage 
bureau or deling service. 


PBfFECT PARTNERS For (He 
coming tntreduettone Won 
Country/ South Wales oeuSa 
Tel: Bom Q22S 483000 


NCHMOMD DINING 

Single A tntcroded in wiping * 
dlnuvg locally? 081 977 5453 


SELECTIVE SEARCHES The 
Pmonauecd totroouctlcxi 


women. Academia, tnlettoctu- 
ala 6 Professional poopie. To! 
071 287 0935 Kants: 0489 
677789 Dorset- 0202 761721. 
AH are Interviewed omrr of 
Fair Trading approved 
procedure*. 


'THE ULTIMATE m small, a 

lotneaaura marriage bore 

<S-Ter ) Eat. I960. Ktohartne 
Altai. 18 Thayer SL Lo n do n 
WIM BLD. TaL- <771-906 32 2 G 


"TWO" is about success) Brtngtog 
lve _ Bt|li 



dwe men look forward to meat 
log you) Our prom 
conanuee el £126. Be pan of 
ar ouoreasf Don’t trunk about tt 
can us at Bond Street on 071 
493 4413. 


WOULD anyone Uke to U ws In a 
Stalely Home rrnmtop holiday 
craft courses for s to gie people. 
Suit pnifaiuliaial of comfort 
means To) 0647-40820. 


GENTLEMEN 


AMERICAN professional an one 
year s abbaUcai areas earing, 
cultured, cuddly, tleganr wU 
ow. oarty Sirs, tor permanant 
reuaonehlp. Box No 8186 


ARE YOU a realty good looking 

tomato who Htces lo took glare 

ourous 8 ftmtotoeP I an 36. 

Ian. very good luting, sincere 

* wealthy with varied lntarasn 

S/won. Why nor send a photo 

/Phooa no. lo: box no 0219 


ATTRACTIVE, liberal thinking 
prof reel onto. 27. Mlddla 
baaed, fuq lo gat an wtuu 
entoy* usual reorts and sodto 
scans. Seeks true end aff ectkre 
ate young lady of acme mtod 
and body. Photo np g r a n at a d. 
Pteave Repay to Box No 0200 


Dofefijte 

«Mb DATELINE GOUk ms 



871 93C Mil 


AB1A 


COUNTRY 

PARTNERS 

An IntroduclKXi Service tor 
p mf i isinn aL intdlgnt people 
nabonwide. All toeuibmare 
in t e r vie v ad uibe Ibetr 


0 yean I 
Tet Heaiber Heber Percy 
fa father details. 

On 088 122 437. 


JjwwvaJdi 

NATIONWIDE 
INTROTUCnONS 
Here 


imt L » mods ■ fli nv nd 


Free DtoaBiWdto Toe 
LOVEBUTCB 
Bef NSAT P .O. Bax 17 

rrT «]W & *' 

6353 740358 (24fer) 


ATTRACTIVE - Pmfesitwtial 
good humoured guy 41 seeks 
attractive so l vent female 
ztra/ars for run. mendsMp. 
romance Dorset cobsl Photo 
a ar. Reply box no 0202 


Ready for Christmas? 

We are tt 

DINNER SUITS 


Cafl tn am Worthing 

6903 244280 


SIRIUS 


The intelligent 

PERSON'S 

INTRODUCTION 

AGENCY 

If you are intrUigrm, 
artkulata ami well 
educated, then vre are [be 
■turodactioo agency far 
yon. We ore very selective as 
ire would expect you to be, 
wc operate nationally and 
our service is very difiomk 
Call ns or write for 
our brochure. 

16 Clay Heyet, Cbdinrd, 
Cheshire, SKU 9ST 

“Ifel: (0625) 860924 

(34 Ho urs ) 


GENTLEMEN 


SORTA CHARMING 
AMERICAN GUY 

WILL BE IN LONDON XMAS 

CurriMful || V n*u hiirtalno ■ .<9 - « 

JU ttdlw lw it* I o Mif DOddOdy mSWjWw ®0 DOTRQ 

wWi bra* M.Y. 660$. WobU Ob to neat «*• (Ml wKfc 

(and marry?) a Ciil PiML aware, u llt licll vd. non-moHag, sTas, 


30+ womaa who i* sontirtvg, brftrei fa r omoweg, g^oyt the 
perforamts arts, *g a n t food served with* rtyht, tr o wd, 
eomra rm l i o H ood fanghlttr with t ri a A o aood beafc, mntic. 
ihe riBoaq, quart timas. I hove a pboUo of PCs, warlmy 
through cafoltigiiM and a lots af grwyfag hair at tiie fmaplw- 1 
am 5' 10” fit, very easy an tin «yts (Woe) and look (and act) 
nm* younger them my 56 chronological yarn. Serious 
eoqubigs only (with photo) toe 

Box No 0204 






htargoto. Kant. CT9 IBA. 0043- 

290736. AlhWuhd on Wogev 

Where Thread Ufa. KUrosr are.. 


tolL Nlra to my early BOto. living 
to Omni Lonun. 1 would bXa 
to mml a welMntonnad. atogaol 


36-40 who would onto*'' a cui 

Torad and IntrlbomL wtocty 

Wr dH.^ aM 8MW who 1 * 


llhy, 

OtnUoraan 49 divorced. Oonakt- 

«rvd ve ry attractive- Many 
toierests. FrancophBs home In 

SSS. " R***- OdveBBig. 

Drmid wowing, language*. 1 

*°r and span en 


SB-oo. U tbw rlisnusii y is rtau 

m pt SET. 

Rg S to fat No 0234 


40*. dtvarosd. goad bodywork. 

Entoar* tnnL ^ "***)) aoH. 

!** l ? a y- Onw* abundance He. 

fato lODto iMy 3848 . n/s. to 


London. Reply to Box No Plot 


6*. 49. kind. 


/dwildi dftA. fit winn vounft 

may ago g, tortoTaum 


VIA* retln 


mala entows trovsl - puff aoaa 

humobr aosfc* atoo wmKny attm 

toten tgant an d warm famnto BCk 

ODb aims'. Please Rapty to 

Bote no 0189. 


sw BMM radred WHOUW osota 

otactrv* tody -*B/b 8 tor core 

o an toaNilp and foreign tooUdaw 

to 1993. Box No oia a" 1 ”"*— 


US M»* 40 neks ratoUaneMb 

"US «r hBbdd EngHNi wmu 

H team BO rn ofage. Ptoase 

Reply to Box No 0106 


vary an active . Me 
wen m ma n tod . n/s. 
■ KR younger, dm. 





a/a woman, 22-34 ror 
comaaidmnMp and low. LUccs 
" ■ akllng, music. UiaalM. 

■ Xmas 


WARM., witty. < 

Ova man a aa fr* (gvsty lady to 
mare maat restaurants, samu- 

*y8«pentog 


Pre stos ovontogt. I ore so. ore. 
reaNuL secure and offer ham 
ttwm to a youagar SOMr?. relu 


to Boat No 02tB 


w 55S? ,u 3S« I cl s?£ jS w ® n * ,a 7 ® 

6*ddn N/S Profassloaai wlir, 
many totors m* aaafc* neni ran? 
pswmt carmo muWcal r? mtSSI. 

wm, photo rn 


WOMJVM wilt) ttocvNni ar a pw, 

fttmh tmndnm bv SS, 

witom»chtog 

London. Box No ot-re 


48- VR OLD (bn 


hontay.no* 

■“ lady In 


ALL BOX 
NUMBER 

replies 

SHOULD BE 
ADDRESSED TO; 

C/o The Times 
Newspapera, 
P.O.BOX484, 
Vbghiia Street 
London El 9DD 























1 


4 

i 

3 

J 


10 


TIME OFF 


SATURDAY DI 



w 


When you grow out of cider swigging and unsubtie chat-up lines, what 
constitutes a good party? Julia Llewellyn Smith finds out 

Roaring teens, boring twenties 


hen Ruth. Wil- 
liam, Damon 
and Henrietta 
were 15, no party 
was complete until they had 
swigged a whole bottle of rider, 
snogged die first body avail- 
able, and ended the evening by 
bring side in the bushes. 

Time has passed. Ruth, Wil- 
liam, Damon and Henrietta 
are now 23. and find them- 
selves at parties balancing 
glasses of beaujolais on a plate 
which also holds two coddail 
sausages, a vokau-veni and a 
miniature onion bhaji. 

They an agree that parties 
are not what they used robe. “I 
hate having to stand around 
asking complete strangers 
what they da It was much 
more fun when you just got 
down to it and snogged them," 
complains Damon, a journal- 
ist- “I prefer dinner parties, 
where you can talk properly to 
people and get to know some- 
one new quite well: or dubs, 
where you can just dance. 
Parties are a horrible mixture 
of the two." 

Damon, who is young and 
free, but slightly tired of being 
single, knows that the past is 
another country, where they do 
things differently. “You grow 
out of that kind of thing. 15 
times bitten twice shy and all 
that-” But he admits that 
meeting “babes” is still at the 
back of his mind. “The only 
thing different from my teen- 
age years is that everyone is 
more subtle these days. Instead 
of grabbing an attractive girl, 
with all your mates looking on 
approvingly, you are more 
likely to do the ‘I live in 
Camden and you live in 
Clapham and this party is in 
Netting Hill, so it makes 
perfect sense to share a taxi 
home,' routine. Just as unsub- 
tie, but in a different way." 

Unfortunately for Damon, 
there is no male equivalent of 
the little black dress. “I always 
think about what to wear to a 
party, but I always end up 
wearing what I would in the 
street" He says he thinks 
many men secretly enjoy black- 
tie occasions. “We all end up 
looking the same, but at least 
there is more of a sense of 
dolling yourself up. Men miss 



LEFT 

From left, Damon wears Levi’s 
denim shirt, £38 from Moonshine. 
PonobeUo Road; T-shirt. £8 from 
The Garage. Kings Road: jeans. 
£30 fnm Camden Marius: boots. 
£70 from Cowboys and Indians. 
Kings Road, Rath nears trouser 
suit, £ 40 reduced from £ 3 69. from 
the British DesignerSale; 
necklace. £10 from Monsoon: 
shoes, E25 from Cable sale. 
William wears suit which belonged 
to his grandfather: shirt, £5 from 
Flip ; tie was a gift Julia wears 
leggings, £27 from Pineapple; 
shirt , £40 from Jigsaw; boots. £25 
from market staiL Patrick wears 
Dehnvilland jacket, £120 from 
Woodhouse ; trousers. £35 from 
Review, shirt. £50 from Renaldi. 
King's Road. Henrietta wears 
shirt, £40 pom Warehouse ; skirt. 
£25 from MissSelfridge: body. 
£27 from Oasis: earrings. £10 
from shop in St Tropez: bracelet. 
ElOfrom Next: shoes. £45 from 
Sacha. 


RIGHT 

Ruth wears body. £12 from Maria 
8 Spencer: chiffon shut, fume- 
made ,- trousers, £20 from Camden 
MariceL Julia wears dress, £55 
from Hyper Hyper; necklace, 
earrings, watch, all gifts: n ec kl a c e , 
£8.95 from Accessorize at 
Monsoon. 

BELOW 

William in his grandfather's suit; 
shirt and tie as above 

Photographs by 
Derail McNtefance 




tr 

t • - . - ' 



1 


out on that side of things.” 

Ruth and Henrietta say they 
spend about 20 minutes get- 
ting ready for a party. “TTiat 
was more fun in the old days 
too, when your girlfriends 
came round before the school 
disco and you all swapped nail 
varnish and blusher and did 
each other's hair.” says Henri- 
etta. Both have boyfriends and 
say they go to parties because it 
is a convenient way to see a lot 
of people. "At school and 
oallege you saw your friends 
every day, so the point of 
parties was to meet men." says 


Ruth, who works for a photo- 
graphic agency. “But when 
you start working your friends 
are all scattered and it's won- 
derful to have a big gathering 
and see everyone." 

Neither woman has much 
money, but both make an 
effort to dress up. “When I put 
on my flares and my platforms 
or my hotpants at the end of 
the week it makes me feel 
completely free.” says Ruth. “I 
don’t actually wear shoulder 
pads and stilettos to work, but I 
behave as if I do — all stressed 
and efficient. Dressing up for a 


party is creative and relaxing 
and makes me realise the time 
I have is mine to do what I 
want with." Ruth shops for 
clothes in markets or at design- 
er sales, or persuades her 
mother to make her things. 

Henrietta, who works in arts 
administration, has more ex- 
pensive tastes, but her clothes 
last for years. “When 1 go to a 
party I like wearing old things 
I feel comfortable in. with 
maybe one new thing to boost 
my spirits and make me feel 
vaguely fashionable,” she says. 
This year’s buy is a pair of 


For a very fine copy of ‘Domesday Preserved’ 
we will not ask one penny. It only explains why 
the County Edition is worth so much. 


W hen VffHuun the Conqueror commis- 
sioned the Domesday Book in I08t» it 
was said that'no hide nor yard of land 
was ever left our.' If is still the mo>i complete 
guide ro a country ever commissioned. 

And fom* reigns since Domesday, it is 
fascinating bow relevant it remains. Indeed it 
was last consulted for legal precedent as 
recently as I98Z. 

Of the 15.418 places mentioned in 
Domesday all but a handful can be traced 
today. So it is possible to get a unique picture of 
vour own village, town and county all those 

many years ago. 

Bui if Domesday itself is unique this 
new edition is no less so. 

In 1984. The Keeper of Public Records 
decided to take apart and rebind ihe 
Domesday Folios. The story of this great 
endeavour has been told in a book published 
by the Public Record Office. 

This book is youns as a gift when you ask 
for further information on the County Edition. 

Because it puts into perspective the value and 
quality of the very limited edition primed by 
Afccto Historical Editions at the request of the 

Keeper of Public Records himselt 

THE MOST PERFECT 
FACSIMILE EVER MADE 
When the 900 year old sheets were flat. 

«cfa one was photographed at actual sue by a 
camera the size of a small can And each one 
ffflS printed in full colour on 'Domesday 
parchment' paper with such clarity that one 
can compare the original 'hatr' side of the 
sheepskin with the 'flesh' ride on the neemu 

Indeed at the presentation of the brst 
copy Lord HaUsham commented. 'This 
remarkable facsimile is so dose to dw origmal 

rfaat to most people it is imp^bletojcinhe 

i DOMESDAY COUNTY EDITION 

application for free book and information 

d my illustrated copy of “ Domesday Preserved' and. without obligation, details 
please sen ^ of the limited Domesday County Edition including particular* 

rf^coSent payment plan. T am over 18. 






difference." The first copy now rests in the 
Royal Library at Windsor. Only 250 of these 
complete Editions were ever primed and they 
cost £7.5fl0 each. 

DOMESDAY COUNTY EDITIONS AT £375 

For most people interested in their 
specific area however, the County Edition 
offers exactly the same quality of 
craftsmanship for each of the thirty one 
counties in Great Domesday. Owing to the 
delicacy of the plates only 1000 copies will 
ever be produced. 

The rebound Domesday Book is non- 
back in rhe Public Record Office and is 
unlikely to be unbound again for many 
generations. 

The County Edition is therefore, like 
Domesday itself, unrepeatable. 


Name 


Initials 


Title 



Postcode 


Tel 


RW 


L mm-TsPTEDlBY ALECTO HISTORICAL EDITIONS AT THE 
Pl lKVrrSTON OF THE KEEPER OF PUBLIC RECORDS. 


HOW TO APPLY FOR YOUR 
DOMESDAY COUNTY EDITION 
Already many copies of the County 
Edition have gone to libraries and important 
collections throughout the country. The 
remaining sets will be allocated on a first 
come first served basis. 

All successful applicants will receive the 
DOMESDAY FOLIOS accompanied by maps 
enabling you to compare place* recorded in 
Domesday with todays towns and villages. In 
addition there are two essential companion 
volumes: DOMESDAY BOOK STUDIES which 
oilers indispensable knowledge about haw 
Domesday was compiled and the England of 
**00 years ago. and the TRANSLATIONS into 
modem English which, for ease of reference, 
are arranged in the column far- column format 
of the original text. 

This volume also includes it full 
introduction to your county as well as indices 
ol ah the people and places mentioned. 

The three volumes, handsomely 
presented in a red quarter-bound leather 
bos which when open doubles as a display 
lectern, com £375. Yorkshire being somewhat 
weightier costs i.450 

To find out more about how you con 
order one of the limited edition copies and 
receive the free book "Domesday Preserved” 
please fill in the application form below and 
address it to Alccto Historical Editions. 
FREEPOST. 4tj Kelso Place. London VSC8 5BR. 
Telephone enquiries will be taken by Sallv 
Brookes on 071 937 b611. 


dumpy-heeled shoes, which 
add at least four inches to her 
height. “I thought finally I 
would be as taU as all my 
friends, but they are all wear- 
ing heels too, so it ends up the 
same." she laments. 

The only hangover from 
their adolescent wardrobes is a 
disproportionate amount of 
black. “When you are a teen- 
ager blade seems rebellious 
and sophisticated,” says Hen- 
rietta. “1 remember my mother 
was always buying me things 
in horrible bright colours, 
because she thought they were 
young and fresh and blade was 
tarty. Blade is best because it’s 
not too flamboyant, and it 
makes you look thinner and 
more elegant” 

The four wonder what teen- 
agers get out of parties. **I 
don’t think the kind of party 
where you say so-and-so’s fam- 
ily is away, let's all go round 
there and break into the drinks 
cabinet exists any more," Ruth 
says. "These days they are all 
taking Ecstasy, which kills 
their sex drive, and raving the 
night away in warehouses in 
the middle of the country. Our 
wild, rider-drinking youth 
seems so sweet and innocent in 
comparison." 





BREAK j 
CHRI 


If the sound of jingle bells is less than music to your ears, esc : 


Santa-free zones 


■ Hotel Nelson, Prince of Wales Road, Norwich HR l IDX 
(0603 760260). Bah-Humbug Breaks, Dec 28-Jan5, any three 
nights £58.50-167. 50 per person, accommodation, breakfast 

■ Gkfieigii Park, Chagfont, Devon 7Q13 8HH(0647 
432367/432225). No organised progra mm es at Christmas or New 
Year. Rooms and suites £270 to £350 including dinner for 
double occupancy. 

■ Youth Hostels Association. Trevelyan House. 8 St Stephen's 
Hill. St Albans. Herts ALI 2DY(0727 55215). Hostel winter 
lettings are bookable through the three regional offices: 
northern England (for hostels from Peak District to Scottish 
bonier). Matlock (0629 825850); southern England, Salisbury 
(0722 337515); Wales. Cardiff (0222 396766). TheScottish Youth 
Hostels AasocialHM, 7 Glebe Crescent. Sorting FKS 2JA (0786 
51 181) operates a similar scheme. 

■ Slakes Hofidays, Wroxham, Norwich. Norfolk NR 1 2 8DH 
(0603 783221). Other agencies with country cottages available for 
Christmas include Engfish Country Cottages, Grove Farm 
Bams, Fakenham. Norfolk NR2 1 9NB (0328 851 155). 

■ BrnterfieWs I sdian Railway Tour (0262 4 70230). 


How to duck 
the season’s 
greetings 




) 


awoug- - -. 


A Capital Weekend 

A TWIN ROOM FOR £136 PER NIGHT* 


die history, the 
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Enjoy exquisite cuisine 1 and 
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H ow do you escape 
Christinas if you are a 
modem and unre- 
formed Scrooge? It is not easy. 
If Christmas at home is a 
daunting prospect promising a 
dreadful scenario of warring 
relatives, kitchen disasters, and 
an excess of alcohol, pudding 
and television, then staying' in 
a hotel scarcely promises peace 
on earth either, because most 
hoteliers feel divinely inspired 
to organise programmes of 
non-stop party-hat action, with 
not only Fadier Christmas but 
also carol singers, bdliingas, 
Dickensian actors, mummers, 
pageantry players, pantomime 
cats and the local hunt all 
coming to add their bit to the 
general hullabaloo. 

Even the Nelson Hotel in 
Norwich, which advertises a 
Bah-Hombug Break designed 
for curmudgeons who dismiss 
the. festive season as a total 
bore, proves on Inquiry onfy to 
start the package after its 

house-full of Christmas merry- 
makers has safelypaid up and 
departed. 

The Bah-Humbug Break, or 
Salute to Scrooge Christmas, is 
offered not from Christmas 
Eve to Boxing Day, as one 
would mean-spiritedly have 
hoped, but between December 


28 and Twelfth Night, when ] 
non-celebrants are invited to- 
pay just £58.50 per person for f 
any three nights (£67.50 iiti 
superior rooms) on the assure 
ance that their lives will remairv 
jingle and carol free during,-* 
their stay. * 

In previous years the hotel- i 
provided a bowl of gruel each - 
evening, with a guarantee that ; 
it would be served without altf f 
the trimmings, and the man-] 
agement suggested that a', 
wake-up caO could be arranged j, 
each morning in the form ol! 
clanking chains and Mar- 
leyian groaning outside the-- 
bedroom door. 

This year’s incentives^, 
though, are a jar of English -, 
mint humbugs (for spitting:, 
contemptuously at winsome: 
UI 'Chins). a souvenir photofd 
graph of the local tax office,/ 
and the opportunity to tour noli 
only that hard-hearted institun . 
oon but also the local water- ~ 
works and prison too. Guests 
wffl also be presented wfth a-* 
copy of Dickens’s dassit^vok / 
Christmas Carol (heroi" 
E- Scrooge), which is quite tt 
good book until the end when ’ 
d taps hopelessly soppy. 

The glorious Gidlefch Park : 
Hotd at Chagfbrd in Devonjl 
oa the edged Dartmoor an4| 







^MBER 5 1992 


TIME OFF 




e with Robin Young to find some peace and quiet on earth 


TIM CUFF 



iug: Paul Henderson (left) and Shaun Hill get 


am ping distance 
bandoncd pagan 

inger-lesshuicir- 

ak stone row's, 
L\*p Christmas as 
ssible too. 
Christmas deco- 
ic ground floor, 
nd will have for- 
ce pies available 
5 Day for those 
atch diche food, 
owner Paul Hen- 
concession to the 
id will is an extra 
r Shaun Hill’s set 
cognition of the 
r Christmas the 
of supplies n ee- 
ls guests’ choice- 


"We have never organised 
anything spedal for Christ- 
mk” Mr Henderson says, 
“and people seem ro like it that 
way” 

The unChnstmassy ap- 
proach. the excellence of Mr 
Hill’s cuisine and dw 
untinsdled comfort of Gid- 
Icich’s rooms and suites cer- 
tainly seem to, have appeal 
since, despite prices which run 
up to §50 a night for two 
including dinner. *e hotel is 
already fully booked for Christ- 
mas itself, though a few rooms 
are still available within the 

extended holiday period. 

If there are enough like- 
minded Christmas refugees m- 


in the mood as Gidleigh Park 


cent on gening away from it all. 
one possible solution is to hire a 
youth hostel and declare it a 
Christmas-free zone. This year 
for the first time the Youth 
Hostels Association (0727 
55215) has decided to rent out 
its smaller hostels during the 
winter, when they would previ- 
ously have been dosed. Hostels 
with from 18 to 40 rooms are 
available from as little as £100, 
and, although those in the 
south-west have long been fully 
booked for Christmas and New 
Year, a few may still be avail- 
able to serve as safe havens 
from Christmas in less fa- 
voured parts of the kingdom. 

The hostels, at least, come 


devoid of ready-made Christ- 
mas extras, which is more than 
you can say for some cottage 
holiday lettings these days. The 
Blakes Holidays (0603 
783221) brochure, for exam- 
ple, includes properties 
marked with a snowflake indi- 
cating their year-round suit- 
ability. and for Christmas 
several cany the promise of 
turkey, mince pies, trees and 
even presents laid on — which 
anti-Christmassians will find a 
complete turn oft 

A broad, possible ways of 
getting away from it an 
indude Butterfield's In- 
dian Railway Tour, leaving a 
week today and not returning 
until January 4, by which time 
Christmas win be all over bar 
taking down the decorations. 
The tour win rattle through 
southern India from Madras, 
and then follow the west coast 
to Goa and Bombay, where 
any nativity scenes encoun- 
tered are more likely to be real- 
life ones than icons of religious 
or commercial idolatry. 

Or, for something complete- 
ly different from the standard- 
issue British Christmas, you 
could head down under with 
Aasbound (book through trav- 
el agents), who can whisk you 
from Gaiwick to Queensland 
on December 12. take you to 
yisita working cattle ranch (no 
Sale strangers in the cow* 
byres), through the Daintree 
World Heritage rainforest (not 
a Christmas tree in right), and 
on a crocodile-spotting cruise. 

The price is £1,099 — which 
is more or less what Christmas 
is likely to cost anyway if you 
invite the family to join you, 
isn’t it? 



Where to go for a merry 
Christmas away 



We’ll take Manhattan for Christmas: shopping and champagne in the Big Apple 


A gift-wrapped 
package of 
suggestions full of 
seasonal cheer, in 
Britain or abroad 

I n principle Christmas is 
a solemn time of rest, 
renewal and prayer. In 
practice it is more often 
an almighty blow-out involv- 
ing, for many, an exodus to 
places of highly organised mer- 
riment and jollification, which 
is perfectly appropriate since 
die “mas”, as in Michaelmas 
and Christmas, denoted origi- 
nally the sending away of the 
unbaptised so that the temple 
should be pure. 

Modem hotels often look tike 
temples, but their purification 
is generally restricted to the 
necessary observation of the 
food hygiene regulations. 
Many, though, arrange for 
some religious observance too, 
by organising trips to candelit 
midnight mass and hiring 
carol ringers. 

In ecclesiastical terms. 
Christmas is a feast devoted to 
a religious anniversary. In our 
secular world it cunningly 
mixes mid-winter pagan ritu- 
als with the Christian notion of 
breaking bread together, on a 
particularly grand scale. It is 
the last great ritualistic feast 
which survives in this country, 
and our best opportunity to 
reknit the bond between family 
and friends by gorging togeth- 
er again. 

Here, then, are some of the 
best places to enjoy a very 
merry Christmas indeed: 
UNITED KINGDOM 

■ Cathedral Christmases: 
The Lamb Hotel at Ely (0353 
663574), a former coaching 
inn beside Ely cathedral", offers 
a three-night traditional 
Christmas break starting on 
Christinas Eve: £245 an adult 
full board, with carol singing 
and a dance evening. Lainston 
House Hotel Sparsholt, Win- 
chester (0962 863588) will be 
taking guests to midnight 
mass at Winchester cathedral, 
providing roasted chestnuts, 
buttered crumpets and muf- 
fins, mulled wine, a day pigeon 
shoot and pantomime in the 
course of a four-day pro- 
gramme: £625 a person includ- 
ing all meals. 

■ Supersonic sJdghxide: The 
Lygon Arms. Broadway (0386 
852255), the Savoy Group's 
country house, offers a four- 
day break inducting card sing- 
ers, mince pies; midnight 
service. Booting Day hunt meet 
and, for the children, rides in 
the G-Force Simulator which 
recreates the thrill of riding in 
a supersonic jet, or Santa’s 
sleigh: £185 a person per day. 
■ Christinas for gotfahofics: 
Belton Woods Hotel & Country 
Club near Grantham. Lincoln- 
shire (0476 593200) is marking 
the driving range with Christ- 
mas trees, dressing Santa in 
green, presenting personalised 
golf balls, putting jingle-bells 
on the golf buggies, substitut- 
ing a cold turkey picnic out on 
the course for Christmas Day 
lunch, and playing golf videos 
instead of the Queen’s speech: 
£225 a person for a three-day 
package. 

■ Christmas afloat Alve- 
diurch Boat Centres, near 
Birmingham (021-445 2909), 
have nairowboats ready pro- 


vided with Christmas tree, cake 
and presents aboard: from 
£103-£180 a person for a week’s 
hire. Blakes Boating Holidays 
(0603 782911) can provide 
cruisers on the Norfolk Broads 
or canal boats: £333 a week for 
a boat for four to six, or three 
and four-night breaks from 
about £200. 

■ Forte for Christmas: Forte 
Hotels are offering four Christ- 
mas packages at more than 
200 hotels. Gala Celebration 
Christmases with champagne, 
silver service gala dinners, 
dinner dances and visits to the 
theatre, races or other local 
attractions: Family Christmas- 
es with free zoom for up to 
three children, under fives nee, 
under 1 6s £29 a day: Christmas 
Crackers with games, quizzes 
and singalongs; and Tradi- 
tional Christmases with carol 
singers, midnight mass and 
pantomime. Three nights from 
about £55 a night (0345 
404040). 

■ Welsh wonderland: The Al- 
ice in Wonderland Trail is one 
highlight of Christmas at the 
St Tuano Hotel, Llandudno 
(where Alice Liddell stayed, 
aged eight). Others indude the 
Colwyn Male Voice Choir, 
buck’s fizz, 1 avert) read and 
lamb chop breakfast, and a 
Boxing Day race into the sea: 
four nights from £382 a person 
(0492 8744 1 1). 

■ Highland style: The loch- 
side Ballachulish Hotel, BaUa- 


chulish, Argyll (08552 606) 
includes driving disco, heaven- 
ly harp and Highland dandng 
in its three-day programme: 
from £225 a person. 

■ Leisurely homy: H anbury 
Manor, Ware, set in 200 acres 
of Hertfordshire countryside, 
has Insure facilities which in- 
dude a Jack Nicklaus golf 
course, health spa and three 
restaurants under the direction 
of Albert Roux. Carol singers 
on Christmas Eve, Father 
Christmas at Christmas Day 
lunch and a jazz lunch on 
Boxing Day. double rooms 
from £75 a person sharing 
(0920 487722). 

ABROAD 

■ Logging on: Le Chateau 
Montebello, the world’s largest 
and most luxurious log cabin, 
half-way between Ottawa and 
Montreal, has a Christinas 
getaway available from De- 
cember 27 to New Year’s Eve: 
from Cdn$99 (E50) a night 
Cross-country ski-trails, curl- 
ing, snowmobiling, ice-skat- 
ing, snowshoeing, toboggan- 
ing and sleigh-riding. (0101 
819 4236341) 

■ Christmas in Manhattan: 
From December 18 to January 
31 the intimate Mark Hotel on 
the Upper East Side near the 
Metropolitan Museum is offer- 
ing a spedal Christmas pack- 
age including dinner, 
champagne and breakfast at 
US$360 (£232) a couple, with 
the second night at US$235. At 


an extra charge the use of a 
limousine is available for shop- 
ping or sightseeing. (Free- 
phone 0800 282684.) 

■ The home of marzipan: 
Scandinavian Seaways (071- 
493 6696) features Christmas 
holidays not only to Denmark 
and Sweden but also up the 
Elbe to Lfibeck, arriving on 
Christmas Eve. The Lfibeck 
trip, departing from Harwich 
on December 23, includes a 
gala dinner and dance on 
Christmas day, meals and cab- 
ins on board, hotel accommo- 
dation and excursions, and 
costs £391. 

■ For music lovers: Travel for 
the Arts (071-483 4466) has 
schemes which include Vienna 
from December 21-27, with 
Marriage of Figaro at the 
Staatsoper (£995): and Christ- 
mas in the Black Forest. De- 
cember 22-27, Romeo and 
Juliet and Don Giovanni in 
Stuttgart and Baden-Baden 
(E895). 

■ Cruising through Christ- 
mas: Sea Princess leaves 
Southampton on December 16 
on a Calypso Christmas cruise 
of the Caribbean, calling at 
Tenerife and Madeira: from 
£960 (P&O. 071-831 1331).The 
Cun aid Princes’s 14-day 
Christmas cruise leaves on 
December 19, with Christmas 
lunch somewhere between 
Lanzarote and North Africa: 
from £1.645 (071-491 3930). 

R.Y. 


Auniquesetofdrcumstances 
has made possible, foraiimited 
number ofdeparturesonly.a 
wonderful opportunity ofvisidng 
the cities and sights ofJerusaJem. 
Bethlehem, Amman, Petra, 

St Catherine's and the resorts of 
Taba on the Red Sea and Aqaba, all 
in the same itinerary. When you 
consider that the itinerary includes 
four and five star hotels, hal fboard 
anda comprehensive excursion 
programme, the prices represent 
remarkably good value. 

Itinerary in Brief 
Day 1 Depart London for Amman for 
an overnight stay. 

Day 2 Amrn*-Petra/A<Rtla - a Ml 
day tour to Petra, stronghold of die 
Nabataeans from the 3rd century BC 
until its conquest by Rome in 106AD. 
Continue to Aqaba for an overnight stay. 

Day 3 Taba - catch the ferry to 
Nuweiba and travel on to Taba fora two- 
nightstay. 

Day 4 St Catherine's Monastery - 
make a fell day excursion to Mt Sinai 
and St Catherine’s Monastery, built on 
the site of the ‘Burning Bush’, before 
returning to Taba, 

Day 5 Tabaflertuakm - drive to 
Jerusalem for a stay of two nights. 

Day 6 Jerusalem - visit all the main 
sights including the Mount of Olives, the 
Garden of Gethse mane and the old city 

and make a short visit to Bethlehem. 

Day 7 Jerusalem/Amman - drive to 
the Allenby Bridge and cross back into 
Jordan. Visit the Roman city of Jerash 
before during into Amman for the night 
D^> 8 Afternoon departure to Amman 
airport for the return flight to London. 


Journey to the 

LAND of 
CANAAN 



including Petra 
andSt Catherine’sMonastery 

8 days from £545.00 


Departure Dates & Prices 

Mondays 1992 -per person in a twin 

December 14 £565.00 

January 11 £315.00 

February 15,22 JSS&Q0 

March 1.8 £615.00 

March 15.22 £635.00 

Singlesupplement £225ii0 

Includes: air travel 7 nights’ in 4 or 5-star 
hotels, half board, transfers, excursions, 
tour manager. Not included: insurance, 
visas £25, tipping. All prices are subject to 


How to Book 

For reservationspleasc telephone 
071-723 5066 and then complete and 
return the coupon below. 

VOYAGES JULES VERNE 

2 1 Dorsel Square, 

London NW) 6 QG 

ABTA68J 1 5 ATCX 3d 3B- 
Out oflkcuir open far telephone rewr.it kins 
no Saturdays and Sumbysfroni Sam to5pm. 

I 

The Land of Canaan 

Departure Ettc 


Please reserve twin(iiandtor un^lets). 

Name&Address 


PoaCode. TdNo 

1 enclose rnydjctjue fori 


Voya^aJiiksytine. being the depositof^^p 
pwpenon and the insurance premiums. 
Insurance YES /NO. 


toe. 


Signal. 


JULES VERNE , 

^DoreetSqu^.Lorido^NW 6QC _j 










CHILDREN 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 


Get cracking! 


r 


Dig out your old cards, felt-tip pens, tinsel and foil and put 
restless children to festive work, Jane Bidder says 


a CHRISTMAS fever is mounting, the 
children are restless and there’s still 
jfk.W three weeks to go. How can you keep 
them quiet without spoiling the spirit of 
4k L* * ^ Christmas? Easy l well, almost). Dust 

'4l*j0f|2jfc down your dormant artistic skills, scour 
i the kitchen drawers for felt-tips that 

III haven’t dried up and follow' these ideas. 

BBi which always keep my own brood busy 
during the wet weekend lead-up to December 25. 


Carol tape: Assemble children in choir (piano, 
recorder, beans in sealed yoghurt pots, etc) and lead 
them in a chorus of carols. Record on a tape-recorder. 
Makes a tear-jerking present for absent loved ones. 


• Make a pop-up snowman 

Buy a stack of paper cups and trim one cup in half. 
Take the lower section and make a small slit in the 
bottom — just big enough to slide a lolly-stick through, 
so that one end emerges into the cup and the other 
sticks our from underneath it- If you can't find a lolly- 
stick. make an alternative out of cardboard or use a 
plant label stick. The stick must be big enough to reveal 
at least 4in above the rim of the cup when it is 
pushed up. 

Help the children to draw a 4in snowman on stiff 
cardboard [one small circle sitting on top of another 
plus eyes, scarf, etc). Cut out the shape. Glue cotton 
wool over the body plus a thin strip of fabric over the 
scarf for added effect. Also glue cotton wool over the 
outside of the paper cup Stick the snowman on the top 
part of the lolly stick. Push the stick down so that you 
can hold it under the cup. When it is pulled gendy 
down, the snowman should ''disappear" inside the 
"snowball’’ (cup) and when it is pushed up it will 
appear again. Should keep the peace for about ten 
minutes. " 


• Make gift tags 

Cut out shapes (stocking, star, bell) from pliable 
cardboard — perhaps using the patterns illustrated — 
and cover in silver foil. Insert a hole (using a sharp 
pencil) and attach thread. Alternatively, cut out last 
year’s Christmas cards and make a hole for thread. 


• Make your own cards 

Father Christmas face card: fold a square of sugar 
paper in half. Draw a pencil outline of the face (copy 
from an old card or book). Cut out asimilar shape from 
coloured paper/felt/ gold or silver foil and glue over the 
face outline. Do the same for Santa’s hat. using red 
paper. Cut out tiny black, dots from paper/ felt for eyes 
and a Larger red blob (or half a glac& cherry) for the 
nose. Glue ration wool on for the beard. 


• Make a Christingte 

Using a potato peeler, carefully gouge a hole out of the 
top of an orange (deep enough for a candle to sit in). 
Tie a red ribbon round the centre of the orange and 
fasten with a drawing-pin. Sit orange on a saucer. 
Push a candle into the hole. Stick raisins. glac& cherries 
or olives on to four cocktail sticks and insert these 
round the candle. Use as a table centrepiece. The word 
“Christingle’’ means “Christ-Light” and dates back at 
least 300 years. The orange represents the world and 
the candle symbolises Christ 


• Make a Christmas tree 


Cut out two identical Christmas tree shapes (about 
lOin tali) from stiff cardboard. Decorate the shapes 
using the stencil on the right (just cut our the black 
areas, then place over the card and colour through the 
boles) — young children will need help. Then make a 
5in slit in the top part of the tree and a 5in slit in the 
bottom pan of the second tree. Other decorative ideas 
indude cut-out shapes (presents, toys, stars, etc): milk- 
bottle tops, which you can make star-shapes out of 
before glueing on trees: glitter pens (available from 
stationers); cut-up pieces of tinsel so you can glue on 
tiny sparidy threads: ribbon rosette (from last year’s 
bag of left-over wrappings) for the star at the top. 
Carefully lower the tree with the bottom slit over the 
tree with the top slit so the two join to form a tree with 
four sides. Should stand independently. If not, prop up 
surreptitiously. 


• Cook St Nicholas letter biscuits 
(adult guidance needed) 

Ingredients: 

_ 400g/llb pasny 

200g/8az marzipan 

milk 


• Make a present 

Another way of pressing home the age-old homily that, 
despite the power of children’s advertising. Christmas 
is for giving and not just receiving. 

Pot a hyacinth: FDl half a plastic flowerpot with potting 
soil. Help the child plant a bulb and then add another 


This is a Dutch children's tradition for St Nicholas’s 
Day tomorrow. Set the oven to 200C/400F. gas mark 
6. Make pastry (or buy. ready-made) and roll out 
thinly. Cut into strips, about 10cmx4cm. Put a little 
sugar on your hands and then roll marzipan into 
finger-sized “worms”. Wrap each “worm” in a strip of 
pastry, gently pressing the edges together with a dab of 
milk to seal them. Gently form each roll into the shape 
of a letter. Some are easy, such as “U" or “S”, while 
others will need to be made with more than one strip. 
Place letters on bolting paper, tearing space between 
each one. Bake for 10-15 minutes in centre of oven. 
(Adapted from The Lion Christmas Book, compiled by 
Mary Batchelor, Lion Paperback. £3.95.) 


earth layer. Cover the pot with festive wrapping paper 
and tie a ribbon round (op. Granny will be thrilled. 
Cracker gift: Place a small bar of soap/scent/hanky, etc 
inside lavatory roll inner. Cut out an oblong of 
wrapping paper which is 6in wider than the roll. Wrap 
round and tie excess ends with a rubber band or 
thread. Then tie ribbon at each end to resemble a 
cracker. Should not be pulled. 


• Make window stenefl 

Take a window-pane-sized piece of cardboard or sugar 
paper. Draw a Christmas shape (bell, star, etc, or use 
the shapes, right), tearing a wide margin around it 
Cut round the outline (so you can see through the 
shape but the cardboard square outline remains. Fix 
the stencO on to the window with masking tape (to save 
paintwork) and spray, using Snow Spray (E 1 .25 from 
W.H. Smith). Alternatively, place sheet of cardboard 
underneath the stencil and spray on to that. Then fix 
the sheet with stencil outline on to the window pane. 


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Trade: 071^81 1986 
Private: 071-181 4000 


GUIDE 


071-181 9313 
071-782 7828 


LONDON PROPERTY 


COUNTRY PROPERTY 


WANTED! 


SHOW KITCHENS! 


We are currently expanding across the country-, and we genuinely require a limited 
number of householders - sorry no tenants - to be showbouses. 


number of householders - sorry no tenants - to be showbouacs. 

All you have u> ac jo Obtain your kitchen at a fraction of tbe true cost, is to allow 
Arthur Rathbonc to show a maximum of 6 potential customers around your 
kitchen within 3 months. If you genuinely want to modernise your kitchen. 


DON’T DELAY - PHONE NOW! 0582 29404 
ASK FOR MARKETING MANAGER CHRIS PLUMMER 



*Wriaea gwud a w lot fiaanr* oa icqaat* 

A BoUtap. Kfawhwa Way. BapnaM Street, Luton LU2 7K> 
AJtTHUR KATHBONE 
FIRST FOR QUALITY & RELIABILITY. 


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NOTICE TO 
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Prices from £187,500 T"T 

ONLY FOOT REMAMNG 


WESTERN 
0454 615927 


0959 561499 


CHEW STOKE, AVON 


RICKMANSWORTH, HERTS 
The Coppice 

Five individual detached family homes 
conveniently situated within easy walking 
distance of the town centre and station 
(Matylebone 35 mins). 5 bedrooms. 

2/3 bathrooms, 4 reception rooms. 

Prices from £325,000 ONE SOLD YT 


In the heart of a lovely village conservation 
area, five houses in three different designs. 
Two only remaining, both with unspoilt 
open outlooks and including carpets. 
Prices from £225,000 TT 


Well designed mews properties dose to the 
market town centre of HOrsham. ranging 
from 3 bedroom retraced to 4 bedroom semi 
detached houses. Prices from £99,950 


Box Number replies 
should be addressed 
to:- Box — 

The Times 
P.O. Box 484 
1 Virginia Street 
Wappins London 
El 9DD 



STANTON DREW, AVON 


Conn Farm 


Two individual part stone houses on the 
village edge wira lovely views over open 
countryside. 5 beds. 3 bath. 4 reception rooms. 
Prices from £245,000 

CHELTENHAM, GLOS 
Blrchley Heights, Battledowo 
A magnificent house in an elevated position 
with commanding views over Cheltenham, 
In a private estate. 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 
4 reception rooms. Fully carpeted with fully 
landscaped garden. Available for immediate 
occupation. Price £335,000 
PART EXCHANGE Af ARABLE 


WEST CHILTINGTON, WEST SUSSEX 


Sandown 

Two detached bungalows In tranquil 
residential location offering 3 bedrooms. 
2 bathrooms, seduded ga 
Prices from £144,950 

OM-f flEHEMUNMG 


EMERSON PARK, ESSEX 
The Woodlands 
An exclusive development of just five 
Individual detached family homes in one of 
the most prestigious residential roads in the 
area. The nearest mainline station is 
Romford (Liverpool 5c. within 30 mins). 
Prices from £410,000 
ONLY THREE EMIM 


HADLOW DOWN. SUSSEX 
Beechwood 

3 bedroom detached bungalow on comer 
pkJL Lounge, kitchen, family bathroom, 
en -suite shower room to bedroom 1 . Garage 
and manageable gardens. Price £1 15, (XX) 

ONLY QIC BEMAWMC 


HAMPSHIRE 

0256 814314 


KENT 

0959 561499 


NEAR MAIDSTONE, KENT 
Roseacres, Bearsted 

4 and 5 bedroom family hones situated on 

the outskirts of Maidstone and within easy 
walking distance of Bearsted Railway 
Station. Selected properties offer a design 
package including carpets, curtains and . 
light fittings. YT 

Prices from £185,000 to £245,000 


ABBOTTS ANN. HAMPSHIRE 
St Marys Meadow, Uttie Ann 


NEAR HENLEY ON 
THAMES, BERKS 
P amas kfieM. 

Warren Row Road 
Set Immediately adjacent to miles of rolling 
countryside, this group of just six Impressive 
and individually designed country bouses 
feature concrete middle floors and-offer 
five bedrooms, three bathrooms and four 
reception rooms. TT 

Prices from £425,000 Td: 0734 40/498 
ONLY THREE REHJUHNB 


Six only beautifully appointed 4 & 5 
bedroom houses, in five different dcs 


bedroom bouses, in five different designs, 
on tbe edge of a lovely village, conveniently 
placed for the A303/M3. 

Prices from £l 75,000 -fT 

TWEE ONLY REHASHING 


BETHERSDEN, KENT 
Academy dose 

Conveniently located between Ashford and 
Temwden, this select development offers . 
2.3.4 and 5 bedroom homes. Fluddey 
Railway station serving Central London is 
within easy access. 

Prices from £68.000 to £220,000 TT 


FLEET, HAMPSHIRE 
The Glade. Albany Road 
Last few superbly appointed 5 bedroom 
houses available for immediate occupation 
on tills wed located development, convenient 
for tbe town centre and main line railway 
station. Prices from £189,950 ^ 

PART EXCHANGE AVAILABLE Tr 


LANGLEY VALE, EPSOM, SURREY 
Mannamead, Beaconsfieid Road 
Located in the centre and backing directly 
onto die scenic Epsom Downs, this 
development of three and four bedroom 
detached family homes Is ideal for those 

seeking a rural home yet requiring Iasi 
access to London and the motorway 
networks of Great Britain. TT 

Prices from £135.000 TcL 0372271518 


BECKENHAM. KENT 

Brackley Road 

Four bedroom family homes set in a quiet 
cul-de-sac backing onto sports field, yet 
within easy walking distance of Beckenham 
lunction RaiiwAV Station and Beckenham 
High street Read; u.- jr.-nediaie occupation. 

Prices from £165.950 


DORCHESTER ON THAMES. OXON 
Castle Mews, Bridge End 
Three only delightful fincuty cottages, two 
3 bedroom and one 2 bedroom, dose to the 
river in a sought after Thames-side village. 
Ready for occupation-complete with fitted 
carpets. Prices from £75,000 
TWO ONLY MHIUBIE 


REIGATE, SURREY 
Trencrom, Raglan Road 
Five meticulously designed and traditionally 
constructed family homes featuring concrete 
middle floors and set on the slopes or the 
North Downs, facing south with panoramic 
views over the historic market town of 
Reigate. Prices from £299,950 TT 

Telephone: 0737246837 

ONLY TWO REWUNHG 


All Sales Offices Open 7 days a weed: 


-|-> SHOWHOUSE ON SITE 

1 I O-EMVOsrr- VO ‘Tpr-r. OAILV 


TAKE THE STRESS OUT OF BUYING 
year new home, use our Part 
EiiChecKQfi / Redundancy Protection 
Scheme on selected sites 
P. ease phone jor details 




HOMES 


QUALITY TO APPRECIATE 






















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*3* 








SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 

PROPERTY 

Whether it s sand an d sunshine or the ski slopes of the Alps, Rachel Kelly suggests festive rental accommodation 



Wi nter viwidwto'ids, worlds apart rent a chalet in the French 
Alps for Christmas, or (right) Noble House in Jamaica 

White 
Christmas 
for rent 


a NOBLE House is 

set in five acres of 
• Jamaican tropical 

gardens stuffed 
Hh with bougainvillaea 

•4UJ0 |Sfc 311(1 banana and 

1 * breadfruit trees. 

Ill Those staying tend 

BBB to relax in the 90F 

December heat: strolling the few 
minutes to the 500ft private beach, 
or dipping into the limpid pool in 
front of the rough-tiled, low-slung 
house, or sipping rum punch on 
the verandah. They can also, if they 
so desire, ask cook to prepare a 
Christmas pudding on Christmas 
Day instead of curried goat. 

That is the joy of renting a house 
over Christmas: all the advantages 
of Christmas good cheer and 
festive fare wan none of the 
miserable British weather. “And if 
you desire a white Christmas, the 
beach is whiter than white." says 
Edward Marquis, from Interna- 


FOR SALE 


about 

£ 330,000 

Caroline Morse 

suggests an ice 
house, oast house, 
cottage or villa 

S& "~y. " '-M 

\ I EAST LcrmiArTltej^S 

\ , \j : : 

|. £ X? \ : 

j 'y 


tional Chapters, which has Noble 
House on its books. 

A white Christmas more tradi- 
tionally demands the icy fingers of 
winter snow. The chances of that 
are remote. There has been snow 
on Christmas Day in London only 
five times this century, and in 
Manchester only nine times. It is 
far more likely to be a wet 
Christmas, thanks to global warm- 
ing and the modem calendar. 

Whether “white" means snow 
and skiing or a beach and sun- 
shine, the price of renting a white 
Christmas could be more expensive 
this year because of our withdrawal 
from the exchange-rate mecha- 
nism. Rental prices in Austria. 
France and Switzerland are up by 
about 20 per cent in some cases; in 
the Caribbean, they are also up 
because currencies are linked to the 
US dollar. Post ERM, the pound 
has slumped from a rate of about 
$2 to the pound, to about $1.60. 


Renting through a tour operator 
can make bener sense than answer- 
ing an ad in the Sunday papers. 
Peter Dyer, from Crystal Holidays, 
which has about 120 chalets to rent 
in the Alps, recommends dealing 
with a big company which may 
have been able to buy its currency 
before the withdrawal from the 
ERM, as he did. He has thus 
avoided having to add any extra 
currency surcharges to his rentals. 

Larger firms are also likely io be 
able to negotiate better deals, since 
they rent throughout a season. 
These discounts will, in theory, be 
handed over to clients. 

Mr Dyer still has about 20 
chalets for rent over Christmas and 
the New Year, the very highest 
week in die high season. He has 
just launched a brochure of special 
Christmas deals. Those prepared to 


take pot-luck on resorts — who. for 
example, know they wish to rent a 
chalet in France but don't mind 
where — will be offered discounts of 
nearly £150: from £399 a person 
per week, including flights, to 
£259. 


C halets & Hotels Unlimit- 
ed has the Ch&teau de 
Cran chalet for rent, in Le 
Hameau de Flaine, up 
the valley from Flaine itself. It 
caters for those who prefer infor- 
mality, says Marion Eamshaw- 
Sullivan from the agency. “People 
can stock their own bar with duty 
free or enjoy a cup of tea when they 
want." 

International Chapters also has a 
few of its 50 houses in the 
Caribbean for rent, including No- 
ble house, ai £5,350 a week for 


eight people. (That does not include 
flights.) The price is roughly the 
same as last yean had it not been 
for the effect of the end of the ERM, 
the price would have fallen. Mr 
Marquis says. 

That might seem steep, but 
compare it to die price of renting 
Necker, Richard Branson's whole 
Virgin island, which costs $8,250 a 
day (about £5.500). And compare it 
to die price of Jamaican holds, Mr 
Marquis says. “Hotels which offer 
similar levels of service would 
charge rates of about £2,000 a week 
per person, though that does in- 
dude flights. For eight adults, that 
means that a week would cost about 
£16.000.” 

Mr Marquis estimates that the 
food and drink bills staying at 
Noble House would be about half 
those of staying in a hotel such as 


The Half Moon in Jamaica, or the 
'Sand Piper in Barbados. “And 
you're more flexible. You can eat 
when you want, what you want I 
think that's - one of the main 
changes in rented accommodation. 
In the past people thought of it as a 
self-catering holiday, which didn't 
sound much like a holiday. Now 
these houses are more like a private 
hotel. You have got everything to 
yourself: the swimming pool the 
bar." 

While the prices of such houses 
may have gone up because of the 
end of our membership of the 
ERM. the compensation is that 
more are available than in past 
years, espedally once Christmas 
and New Year are over. Deals will 
hot up later in the year. 

Supply of houses overseas has 
gone up as those who fail to sell in a 


worldwide slump, espedally across 
Europe, let instead, and buyers are 
scarce. “I've got an awful lot of mv 
clients who are trying to sell and 
renting out meanwhile,” says Mr 
Marquis, “but I've got practically 
nobody who wants to buy.” 

Demand for rented property in 
the Caribbean, dominated by 
Americans, has slumped with the 
American recession. In the Alps, 
bookings for skiing holidays are 1 2 
per cent down this year compared 
to last, Mr Dyer says. Even Christ- 
mas week, the most popular week 
in the year, is less busy this year 
than last. Hurry and you could be 
enjoying Christmas pudding on 
file veranda. 

• International Chapters (071-722 
9560): Crystal Holidays (081-339 
5144); Chalets and Hotels Unlimited 
(081-343 7339). 



A flair for Francophile tastes 



Scotland: Snawdon House, Gifford, East Lothian. Detached 
Georgian residence in five acres of gardens and woodlands. Five 
bedrooms, bathroom and shower room and three reception 
rooms. Old mill pond and ice house. About £335,000 
(Strutt & Parker, 03 1-226 2500). 


♦ living in France — The 
Essential Guide for Property 
Purchasers and Residents by 
Phillip Holland (published try 
Robert Hale, £14.95). 

For anyone considering a holiday 
or retirement home in France, or 
who already owns a property there, 
Phillip Holland’s book Living in 
France is a must This sixth edition 
provides a mine of useful informa- 
tion. It offers sound advice on the 
whole range of administrative, 
technical and legal de- 
tails; lists specialised con- 
tacts; and gives tips on 
how to make your garden 
grow and the right wine 
to drink with cheese. 



Buyers France 

Gift ideas with a distinctly French flavour 
for those who need a little encouragement 


BUYING & RESTORING 

OLD PROPERTY 1 


; ! DEVON 
l | Somarton Lodge 
! I £340,000 




LONDON W8 
23 HWgate Place 

£335.000 


KENT 

Gun Green Oast; 
£320.000 




■ 


Kent: Gun Green Oast Hawfchurst Converted oast house in 
6.75 acres. Gafleried landing with five bedrooms, three 
bathrooms (including master suite and guest suite), three 
reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room and two cloakrooms. 
About £320,000 (GA Town& Countiy. 0892 5427] 1). 





London: 23 Hfflgate Place. 

VVS. Four-bedroom Victorian 

cottage with two bathrooms 
(including one en-suite). 
drawing-room. 

kitchen/brcakfast-room-The 

roof terrace is south-facing. 
About £3 1 S.OOOjjonnp. 
Wood. 07 1-727 070?). 



Devon: Somerton Lodge. Sidmouth. Grade II listed Regency 
villain 1 .6 acres. Five bedrooms, two bathrooms, three 
reception rooms, kitchen /breakfast room, doataoom; cellars. 
Double s^age ana outbuildings. About £340,000 
"(Strutt & Parker, 0392 2 1 563 1 ). 


• live & Work 
in France by Mark 
Hempshell (Vacation 
Work, 9 Park End 
Street, Oxford, pbk 
£6.95). 

A derailed survey of op- 
portunities for working 
and living in France — 
from the Alps to the 
Pyrenees and from Ca- 
lais to the Cdte d’Azur. 
Those planning to work, 
start a business, or retire 
in France will find this 
book covers all ihe rele- 
vant aspects with advice 
on French conveyancing, 
how to find a job. starting 
a business and raising 
money. There is also a 
regional employment 
guide and a useful direc- 
tory of major employers 
in France. 


♦ Bnyingfi 

Restoring Old Property prac: 

in France try David 
Everett (Robert Hale, 

£16.95). insk 

Having bought your of my 

tumbledown French 7 

farmhouse, this is the 
book to help you restore it — and 
avoid the problems and pitfalls on 
the way. It carries practical 
advice on all aspects of property 
purchase and restoration, from 
what where and how- to buy, 
tackling the French legal system, 
through plumbing, flooring, 
finding tradesmen, buying mater- 
ials and security. There are also 
lists of useful contacts and suppli- 
ers, and a glossary of building 
terms. 

♦ Some of my Best Friends are 
French by Colin Corder (author 
and publisher, pbk £9. 95). 

A very funny book offering a 
valuable background on French 


I GET Bf WTHE LA-VGUAg! / 


LIVING IN 

FRANCE 

TlfE ESSENTIAL GUIDS SOS PROPERTY 
VUKCHASERSAND RESIDENTS 




CPLW CORDER 


1EWORO BY SERGE I 


by David Everett gives 
practical advice onjpurchase 
and restoration 

Insider info: the lively Some 
of my Best Friends are French 
(above) by Colin Corder 


Lifestyle: Live & Work in 
France is about opportunity 


f Holland 


Useful tips; 
Living tn 
France is 
essentia] for 
anyone 
considering a 
holiday or 
retirement 
home there, or 
who already 
owns a French 
property 


words that are the same or 
similar in both French and Eng- 
lish. It’s a fun book and makes 
interesting reading and can help 
beginners and competent French 
speakers alike io improve their 
vocabulary. 

♦ For those who wash to be 
reminded of the beauty of France 
year-round, the Hidden Corners of 
France 1993 calendar from France 
magazine makes a lovely gift — and 
can be sent anywhere in 
the world for £5.95 (inc. 
p&p). It is beautifully 
illustrated and full of 
fascinating facts on all 
aspects or la vie fran- 
faise. From France mag- 

E azine, Dormer House, 
Stow-on-the-Wold, 
Gloucestershire GL54 
P" 1 BN. 


♦ For would-be French 
property owners, a year’s 
subscription to the 
monthly magazine Liv- 
ing France, costing £25 
(mom France Properties 
Ltd, 9 High Street, 
Olney, Buckingham- 
shire), will bring months 
of enjoyment It is packed 
with French properties 
for sale, together with 
useful information for 
prospective purchasers. 




life. Subtitled “How to get by in the 
language and on with the natives", 
it is an insider’s guide to all things 
French, written in a lively and 
amusing style that makes it a 
pleasure to read. 

Most of it is in the form of an A-Z 
from Abb*. Pierre (“the Catholic- 
worker priest who concerned him- 
self with the lot of the down-and- 
outs") to Zola, Emile (“he wrote a 
series of passionate novels about a 
family under the Second Empire*!, 
with a wealth of little gems be- 
tween. This is the book for anyone 
who needs to know how many 
times you should kiss a French- 
man. and where to start — or who 
wrote “Oil sont les neiges d’an- 


tan?”. It also gives hope to those of 
us who lack the confidence to speak 
French badly. An ideal Christmas 
gift for all Francophiles. If you 
cannot find it in your nearest 
bookshop, buy direct from Shelf 
Publishing. 6 St Albans Road, 
Codicote. Hitchen. Hertfordshire 
SG4 8UT (add£l for p&p). 

♦ How to speak 1 00's of 
French Words Without Even 
Trying byJanine Paule- 
Molyneux (pbk £4 inc. p&p). 
Available Jrom Als Paule- 
Molyneux. 3S Eastfreld Crescent. 
Badger Mill, YorkYOl 5JB. 

This is a dictionary with a differ- 
ence, containing nearly 3.000 


» Finally, a present for 
ripg. the man (or woman) who 

jfn has everything except a 

gjg property in France: a 

j f or special course on how to 

ne set about buying one. 

r j nga Adrian and Lulie Webb 

y0 r use their own experience 

tent of buy^g a French prep- 
are, or ^ 10 explain the proce- 

eady dure and pitfalls to 

rench prospective purchasers 

;rty They run weekend resi- 

dential courses from their 
home in Wiltshire, at which expert 
guest speakers talk on French 
conveyancing, the sort of properties 
available, where to find them, 
financial issues and how to negoti- 
ate. The next “First-time Buyers in 
France” course is from January 1 5- 
1 7. It costs £1 50 for full board and 
lectures (£125 for non-residents} — 
including a gourmet New Year's 
dinner with French food and wine. 

A special offer for Times readers 
gives £25 off the normal price of the 
course. Contact the Webbs at 
Cowleaze Paddock. Hanham. nr 
Corsham. Wflishire, SN13 OPZ 
(0249 713179). 

Cheryl Taylor 







14 


ARTS 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


THEATRE: Benedict Nightingale goes out on a dark, stormy night Martin Hoyle looks in on a dark, stormy life 

In sickness 
and in hell 


Magical Noh holds Bard 


The Tempest 
Barbican 


L ast week. Michael 

Bogdanov and his English 
Shakespeare Company 
presented London with a 
Tempest set in a rubbish dump 
somewhere downstream of the Isle 
of Dogs, thereby* depriving the play 
of ail its magic and much of its 
sense. This week, it has fallen to a 
foreigner. Yukio Ninagawa, to 
restore those qualities and bring 
them to our National Theatre. His 
production of The Tempest occurs 
on Sado. a remote island off the 
coast of his native Japan; but it is a 
place that turns out to be several 
thousand miles nearer the imagi- 
nary mid-Mediterranean, and half- 
a-billion closer to the heart of 
Shakespeare's most generous, for- 
giving play. 

Sado has plenty of associations 
for Ninagawa and his countrymen. 
Ir was traditionally a place of exile 
and it is the island to which one of 
the founders of the Noh Theatre, 
Zeami. was banished. It is a 
suitable enough setting, then, for 
what the programme calls “a link 
between the history and cultures of 
Japan and Britain"? Even without 
a simultaneous translator, it is dear 
that Shakespeare's text is played 
pretty much verbatim: yet the style 
veers from something not unaldn to 
Elizabethan-realistic to Noh itself 
For what it is worth, the pretence 
is that one of Sado's many Noh 
companies is performing The Tem- 
pest under the direction of 
Haruhiko Job's Prospero. No 
doubt some parallel between 
conjuty and theatrical creation is 
implied. But in practice it seems 
mainly to mean that the scene- 
shifters and the supporting actors 



From the Bard to London via Japan: a suitably atmospheric scene from Yukio Ninagawa's production of Shakespeare's The Tempest 


remain visible throughout Some of 
them flail away at drums before the 
play begins, their faces hidden by 
devil's masks, and then others run 
onstage to create the first of many 
fine stage-effects. Suddenly a prow 
emerges horn the roughly timbered 
hut in which Prospero lives, fol- 
lowed by a shaken quih and a 
falling blue doth: and there simply 
yet powerfully, is Shakespeare's 
very own shipwreck. 

The Noh influence is most 
evident in a splendid masque 
scene, with tall china-faced figures 
undulating and chanting in exoti- 


cally patterned robes, and in the 
broad comic sequences. Goto Dae- 
mon's Stefano turns out to be a 
great, shiny hulk, naked but for his 
apron and a chefs hah Kenichi 
Ishii's Trinculo looks like an orien- 
tal Easteregg or Japanese Humpty 
Dumpty, and Hiroki Okawa’s Cali- 
ban sports wild spiky hair and a 
long fish's tail, creating the impres- 
sion of a punk sturgeon. They go in 
for leaping, tumbling and loud 
comic display in contrast with 
Alonso. Gonzalo and the lords, 
whose speech and conduct is in 
keeping with die formal modem 


suits beneath their long, colourful 
cloaks. 

To be honest, the contrast be- 
tween East and West struck me as 
too extreme here: but there could be 
no such reservations about the 
central performance. Job’s Pros- 
pero exudes gravity and melan- 
choly power, and has come up with 
an interpretation distinctively his 
own. The wrongs he has suffered 
enrage him, so much so that he 
makes to strike Yoji Maisuda's 
delicate Arid with his staff when he 
gently recommends mercy. But 
then and thereafter he forces him- 


self to lose face: a difficult process, 
maybe even a heroic one, given the 
pain that has all along been 
expressively etched onto it 
That left me feeling how relative- 
ly easily modem British adore 
playing Prospero tend to forgive 
their enemies: how little they strug- 
gle against instincts that the Eliza- 
bethans must have found 
overwhelming. Here, elsewhere, 
Ninagawa arid his Japanese com- 
pany dearly have something to 
teach us. 

B.N. 


I think there 
are two of 
you." says the 
playwright Au- 
gust Strindberg to 
“One of 


Haying the Wife 
Ustinov Studio, Bath 


his leading 
you wants to 
pretend nothing is going on." 

Ronald H flyman's play, which 
had its premiere at Brentford last 
month and is currently on tour, 
dwells much on duality: the love 
and hate found in one relationship, 
die rational and irrational in one 
personality; die difference between 
reality arid truth and how they 
dash when distilled, or muddied, 
by foe theatrical process. 

Strindberg hated women, mar- 
ried actresses, and was driven mad 
by them. A tortured misogyny 
permeates his work. Rehearsing 
with him most have been unrestful 
at foe best of times; and when the 
self-obsessed dramatist confronted 
a player fanatically devoted to a 
truth that she perceived differently 
to him, something — perhaps foe 
sanity of both of them — had to 
give. 

The framework for Hayman's 
play is such a rehearsal Harriet 
Bosse, a young Norwegian actress, 
becomes increasingly unhappy at 
depicting a character based on 
Strindberg's former wife. 

Parallels extend to foe unexpect- 
ed. marriage between foe grimed 
playwright and his new leading 
lady. Scenes of deception, disillu- 
sion and recrimination in his play 
echo real life, as Harriet is drawn to 
a young actor and rebels against 
her tyrannical husband. 

Playwright and actress confront 
one another in the life versus art 
dash. She meets foe model for her 
character and resents foe unfair- 
ness of Strindberg's portrayal He 
claims both subjective and objective 


justification as it 
suits him — both 
first-hand know- 
ledge and foe art- 
ist's right to change the feds. 
Heads he wins, tails everyone else 
loses. . , 

Whatever the historical truth, 
Harriet’s sudden marriage to the 
playwright never makes sense the- 
atrically; it is a case of life imitating 
ait, bad art And as Julia Ormond 
looks and sounds unremittingly 
modem and emancipated. Harri- 
et's diameter becomes both a proto- 
feminist and an irritating exponent 
of Stanislavsky’s method before its 
time. 

She excels when finally quivering 
with rebellious fury, but until then 
never gets an exasperating charac- 
ter into complete focus. 


f; 


l unhermore. foe play’s treat- 
ment of foe nature of theatre 
and its casualties is weak- 
ened by the occasional cliche. 
Strindberg, the omnivorous cre- 
ator, jots down striking lines from 
an emotional scene for later use in a 
play. The plain but devoted dogs- 
body (beautifully played by Jacque- 
line Morgan) dissolves into tears at 
her loneliness. 

Ultimately, Tim Pigott-Smith’s 
production depends on Bany Fos- 
ter's portrait of Strindberg, a mag- 
nificent combination of nightmare 
neuroses and brisk professional 
practicality, selfishness and 
sensitivity. 

Foster has the look of a man 
whose innards are knotted with 
intensity, and deploys the frustrat- 
ed energy of a trapped wasp. The 
dance of defiance he executes on 
stage is a dance of death. 

M.H. 


Mahler in his own milieu 


S ome like to think that 
Mahler's Sixth Sym- 
phony bears foe scars of 
his own harassed professional 
existence at the Vienna Opera. 
Others prefer to see it as a 
musical document set to 
change the face of symphonic 
art as the century turned. 

Whatever may be Christoph 
von Dohnanyi’s view, he 
makes a conscious choice to 
present his performance (Dec- 
ca436 240-2) in an illuminat- 
ing historical perspective by 
twinning it with Schoenberg's 
Five Orchestral Pieces, from 
1 909, and Webern's Sommer- 
wind (1904). No similar cou- 
pling exists in foe catalogue. 

Schoenberg's Express! onis- 
tic miniatures, with their ex- 
periments in controlled im- 
provisation, do for the ear very 
much what his friend 
Kandinsky's canvases do for 
foe eye: their clarity and 
polychromatic panache make 
Webern's vignette seem a fin 
de siedc idyll with only the 
most subtle of hints of the 
shape of things to come. 


CLASSICAL 

RECORDS 


Both works put Mahler’s 
symphony in perspective. So 
does foe Geveland Orches- 
tra's performance: their first 
movement is lean and uncom- 
promising. with stencQ-sharp 
rhythms and bright brass 
chording. Mahler intended 
that foe andante should pre- 
cede the scherzo. In reversing 
foe order, as is common. Von 
Dohnanyi lessens the shock of 
the lullaby following foe abra- 
sive first movement and cre- 
ates a sense of winding down, 
returning from a fine, translu- 
cent slow movement to a finale 
in which textural dissolution is 
never far away. 

While Decca provides a 
generous, although unin- 
trusive soundscape for the 
Sixth. Chandos, releasing foe 
Third Symphony as pan of 
Neeme Jarvi s cycle with the 
Royal Scottish Orchestra 
(Chan 91 17/S) offers less of a 
spread of acoustic space. Jar- 


vi's Mahler, too, is on foe 
sober side. For the composer, 
this symphony was “some- 
thing such as the world has not 
heard before”; yet we hear less 
of the shock of foe new and 
more the loving, respectful 
reconstruction of the accepted. 

This is not to dimmish 
Jarvi's performance, but to 
indicate its scale and its priori- 
ties. With the clarity of its 
quiet, detailed passages and its 
delicate balancing of textures, 
the symphony becomes more a 
magic picture-book, less a 
Nietzschean drama of foesouL 

When Nietzsche’s words ac- 
tually appear. Linda F inni c's 
voice comes into focus from 
the very heart of the orchestra. 
Her mezzo-soprano has the 
dark, true alto range so neces- 
sary for these songs. There is a 
trace of a raw wobble when foe 
voice is under pressure; but 
this is later artfully used to 
focus foe anger, even foe 
horror, within the pain of foe 
Kindertotenlieder. 

Hilary Finch 


Times Day of Gastronomic excellence 

A Waterside luncheon 

□ Champagne 
reception 

□ Six-course 
lunch with five 
classic wines 

□ Table talk by 
Michel Roux 

F ood is one of life's 
pleasures and dining 
out at a good restaurant 
is a special treat, 
particularly just before 
Christmas. So we invite 
you to join The Times, 
the international award- 
winning chef Michel 
Roux, and Douglas Morton 
of Baron Philippe de 
Rothschild fora 

gastronomic Day of 
Excellence at the 
Waterside Inn. Bray. 

Berkshire, on Saturday. 

December 19. 

Your welcome starts 
with a reception at which 
Champagne Henriot 
Reserve Baron Philippe de 
Rothschild 198! win be 
served. 

The superb six-course 
lunch which follows, 
created and prepared by 

M Roux himself, will be 

accompanied by five 
classic wines from the 
House of Baron 
Philippe de Rothschild. 

During the lunch. 

M Roux will explain the 
finer details of such a 
repast and answer any of 
your questions. 

The setting for this 
Day of Excellence could 
not be better; a 
beautiful dining-room that 
overlooks the river 
Thames in the 16th- 
century village of Bray, 
between Windsor and 
Maidenhead. 



Finest fare: a Waterside welcome from Michel Roux 


Imitations are 
limited for this special 
lunch, which starts at 
12.30pm and costs £90 per 


person, including 
champagne, wines, service 
and VAT. We advise 
eariy application. 


■ Please reserve a table for guests at The Times Day of 

Excellence al the Waterside Inn, Bray, on Saturday. December 19. 


NAME 

ADDRESS ,™~ 


POSTCODE ... 


/ enclose my cheque made payable to Times Newspapers lid 
Value £ Cheque number . 


(Please write your name and address on the back of the cheque) 

Post coupon and remittance la The Times Day of Excellence. 
Promotions Department. 1 Fcmungjon Street London El 9XN 

Closing dare for bookings is December 1 1 


Number one with a 
bullet - or a knife 

Ice Cube grows 


rich rapping 
everything that 
offends him — 
most of the 
world, it seems 


ROCK RECORDS 


T 


his week, foe American 
rapier Ice Cube 
achieved what neither 
Madonna nor R.E.M. were 
able to do. His new album The 
Predator (4th & Broadway 
514 351) entered foe Bill- 
board US chart at No 1. 
finally toppling Garth Brooks. 

Barely a week after release. 
Cube's album is already close 
to “registering its millionth 
sale, an astonishing perfor- 
mance by any standards, and 
one which seems curiously at 
odds with foe rhetoric on the 
liner notes which reminds us 
of “white America’s continued 
commitment to the silence and 
oppression of black men". 

Cube, who in the past has 
been far from silent about his 
unpleasant views on a range of 
subjects, is naturally foil of self- 
righteous fury in the wake of 
foe Los Angeles riots, although 
in foe accompanying press 
release he confesses that. “I 
loved . . . every bit of it". 

With its grim catalogue of 
songs glorifying murder 
(“Now I Gorta Wet 'ChaT riot 
rwe Had To Tear This M.F. 
Up") and misogyny (“Check 
Yo Self', “Don't Trust ’Em", 
you name it). The Predator is 
the perfect distillation of a 
gangland culture that has 
descended into a morass of 
mindless violence and un- 
checked machismo, where any 
sort of homicidal sentiment 
may legitimately be expressed 
whether or not it is dressed up 
as a response to foe unwaver- 
ing racism of American soci- 
ety. and where no insult is too 
foul-mouthed, especially if it is 
directed against a woman or. 
better still, a homosexual. 

And yet there is a highly 
stylised and self-regarding 
quality to all this gritty urban 
realism that suggests Cube 
may be peddling a line in wet 
dream violence that is not so 
for removed in tone from 



Ice Cube: taking violence off the streets and into the studio 


Madonna's fantasies about 
sex. The album is dogged with 
gloating references to the 
firestorm of media controversy 
provoked by his own pro- 
nouncements in the past, 
while foe unrelenting expres- 
sions of rage and hatred are 
peculiarly one-dimensional, 
almost cartoon-like in places. 

O n only one number. 
“It Was A Good Day", 
is anything approach- 
ing a positive emotion allowed 
to surface. When some Top 40 
American radio stations seized 
on this song, with evident 
relief, and began playing it, 
foe president of Cube's record 
company was not amused. 
“We are not sure we want that 
kind of image to be the first 
thing new fans are exposed 
to.” he told Billboard without 
apparent irony. 

Meanwhile, foe American 
techno-hardcore group Nine 
Inch Nails have had the 
promotional video for their 
song “Happiness In Slavery" 
banned outright by the British 


Board of Film C las s ifi c ation, a 
very rare occurrence. The vid- 
eo apparently features graphic 
images of foe “performance 
artist" Bob Flanagan under- 
going extreme physical torture 
before being dropped into a 
coffin and supposedly turned 
into mincemeat 

The song is taken from 
NIN’s new album Fixed (TVT 
5 1 4 32 1). which features “var- 
ious interpretations" of songs 
that have already featured on 
their Top 20 album Broken, 
(TVT/Iniersoope 514 147), 
released earlier this year. An 
essential companion to the 
earlier album, on Fixed the 
nastiness is even mare careful- 
ly crafted, foe sounds of pain, 
damage and destruction 
tweaked and elevated to an 
exquisite pitch of artistic 
expression. 

As an illumination of the 
dark side of human nature this 
has considerably greater reso- 
nance than the badmoufo 
posturing of Ice Cube. 

David Sinclair 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 

Christmas Style 


Get set for Christmas with The Sunday Times Style section — including top tips 
on shopping, fashion (forget the little black dress - make an ornament of 
yourself), quality food, choice wines and seasonal recipes 

PLUS 

Christmas Survival Guide — a 24-page special supplement with the Magazine 
Make the most of the festive season — don 't miss The Sunday Times 


Satchmo and 
much more 


IMAGINE 

foe routine: 

30 songs a 

night, in dty after city, for 
week after week. “Muskrat 
Ramble" following “Indiana” 
and “Basin Street Blues" in an 
endless procession. Somehow. 
Louis Armstrong and his AH 
Stars maintained that almost 
masochistic schedule for 20 
years or more. 

From the purist’s point of 
view, it was a period when 
Armstrong frittered away his 
talents on crowd-pleasing an- 
tics. Yet foe most striking 
feature of The California Con- 
certs (MCA/GRP 4-6 1 32) - a 
four-disc set covering two 
shows from 1951 and 1955 
and inducting much previous- 
ly unissued material — is foe 
extraordinary consistency of 
his performances. 

There are, it must be admit- 
ted, one or two lapses in taste, 
but the overwhelming impres- 
sion is one of a masterful all- 
round entertainer surrounded 
fry musicians who were per- 
fectly attuned to his needs. 

The first concert, taped at 


JAZZ RECORDS 


foe Pasadena 
Civic Audito- 
rium, has the 
more imposing line-up. At this 
stage Armstrong still had the 
services of Earl Hines and 
Jade Teagarden, who joined 
forces on a stunning version of 
“Body and Soul”. 

By the time of the second 
recording, made at foe Cre- 
scendo Chib in Hollywood. 
Hines and Teagarden had 
departed, to be replaced by the 
impish Trummy Young and 
BilfyKyJe, who may have been 
a less colourful soloist than 
Hines but was an accom- 
plished rhythm player. 

Barney Bigard's instantly 
recognisable clarinet is present 
on both dates. So too is Velma 
Middleton, foe beefy singer 
cum-vaudevillian whose con- 
tribution was frowned upon 
by many contemporary critics. 

A great blues singer she 
definitely isn’t, yet she conveys 
an irrepressible air of geniality 
on even the wobbliest 
numbers. 

Clive Davis 



Genius at rest Louis Armstrong enjoys the boro of plenty 


ORANGERIE 
ITALIANA 1992 


i he international Fair of 
Italian Art ami Antiques A • 4 
ar the 

Accaderyna Itaiiana, 

24 Rutland Gate, London s’X 7 


VO: - ::-:rh 19?? 

Moraav-Frid^l Ur ,_ 7 ^ 
- Sur.L-.-v. i 'izrr. - 6;:.rr 


A terics or lectures 
on aspects of Italian art 
svill iaKc place Uuruiv rive rair. 



For runner inform: 
and advance tickets 


0/1 225 3474 










) a nd 

nore 


ii# 




THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 


5 1992 


entertainments 



RAYMOND GUBBAT pnsente 
ailheBARBIC AN 

Box Oflkto/CC 071-63S 8891 


TONIG HT at 8 pm 

Cockaigne Overture 
Pomp « Circumstance March No 4 
CeDo Concerto 

Cuigm* Variations 

®*WAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

CHRISTOPHER OAYFORD ennd MORAY WELSH cello 
Sfljai. SM so. s 17 a., s w ssl« 

SATURDAY NEXT 12 DECEMBER at 8 pm 


®gaianight 

A TRIBUTE TO JENNY LIND 

This tribute to the "Swi-tUsh NtehttniUlo* Vnnv Lind Lnr « 
lr.xnMjmm.DM GlmLTfce 

Hs-rn. BrlUnT. Norm, & L« SnsmSS^OnSSSSSa 
U«M«iMar f Rmntad.it. ^gKaTSnT?rScAdL 


NELLY MUUaOHJ WAMANDA McHURRAY mnsn sop 

BONA VENTURA BOTTONE tenor P 

ENGLSH C HAMBE R CH OIR I ntroduce-.! bv JOHN AMIS 
LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA JAMES UXkKaRTmIkI 
SH.Stl. SI 2511. Sib 50. S 18.50. S21 



GLORY OF 


LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
PHILIP SIMMS conductor 
THOMAS TALLIS CHOIR 


SUNDAY 20 DECEMBER at 3 pm 

uf traditional and seasonal items Inc. 

BACH OpeningChorus from Christmas Oratorio-, Air on a 
b -String; FRANCK Panls Angelicus: MOZART Alleluia from 
Exsultat e Jubilate, CLARKE Trumpet Suite; STANLEY 
Trumpet Voluntary; HANDEL Christmas Sequence from 
Messiah; Let the Bright Seraphim; BERLIOZ Shepherd s 
Farewell from L'Enfanct- du Christ SCHUBERT Ave Maria; 
Carols for Choir, Boys Choir & Audience 
El RIAN DAVIES soprano SOUTHEND BOYS CHOIR 
CR1SP1AN STEELE-P ERKINS trumpet 


WEDNESDAY 23 DECEMBER at 3 & 730 pm 

As Christmas Eve approaches, some more festive music Inc. 


HANDEL Messiah ( excerpts); Ave Maria (arr. Gounod); 
Oratorio (Or 


BACH Christmas Oratorio (Opening Chorus): Air on a G 
String; BIZET Agnus Del: FRANCK Panls Angelicus; 
BERLIOZ Shepherd s Farewell from L'Enfance du Christ; 


ADAM Holy City: CLARKE Trumpet Voluntary & Suite 
Carols for Choir, Boys Choir and Audience 


ARTHUR DAVIES ten CAPITAL ARTS THEATRE CHOIR 
CKISPIAN STEELE-P ERKINS trumpet 


57.50, a 1050. S 14.SU. S 1 650. S IB.50 


BOXING DAY aft 8 pm 

ROYAL PHDLHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 


MENDELSSOHN Hebrides Ov. Flngal's Cave 

HA NDE L .. Music for the Royal Fireworks 

RACHMANINOV Piano Concerto No.2 

DVORAK Symphony No.9 from the New World 


© 


JAMES BLAIR conductor 
SIMON MULLIGAN piano 

59.50. 513.50. 51750. S 19.50. 522.50 


SUNDAY 27 DECEMBER at 3 pm 

THE SNOWMAN 


Narrated and presented by ALED JONES 

Howard Make, ounposer and creator of The Snowman, conducts the 
traditional Christmas performance ot the enchanting chUdreiu 
classic with Sabit-Sacns defiphlful Carnival of the An im al s '. Seasonal 
songs for bOV soprano and Hu.- Nuweiy Rhyme Overture. > musical 
Kiwsslng game for all the family with some new tutus this year. 
I'l'niplrtr the programme, 

WREN ORCHESTRA HOWARD BLAKE vond 
ANTHONY MULOR boy soprano 
REBECCA HOLT piano 
SK.W.S 1250.51550 
Children under 16 S7.50.SS5t). S950 


ws 

© 


SUNDAY 27 DECEMBER aft 7 JO pm 

(fa MOZART 

w UV COSTUME 

Don Giovanni Overture Dne fcleine Nachtmusik 
Piano Concerto No.21, K467 Clarinet Concerto 
Symphony No.40 


Tin* MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA bring* an elegant touch of 
Mte l«M>ntvry coatume. 


M-.vanu] sheet perinnnliiK In aullientlc 

”...llic plavcrs were competenl and stylish The Tai — 
LVN WATSON cnnd/planu JACK BKYMER clarinet 
39.511, SKI 51>. 517.50. 51II5U.S225U 


MONDAY 28 DECEMBER aft 7 JO pm 


® GI£NNNmJLER 
ORCHESTRA 

mm * V 


“The Legend Live* On- 

"wsssn s^sess^’ss^s^ 

sa. ill. 513.50. S15.S1650 


TUESDAY 29 DECEMBER aft 3 pm 

© THE POUR SEASONS 

AnEcenhtgofBaroqoeMaMterpiece* 


Art Evening of Baroq 


BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 
PAC HELBEL Canon ALBINONI Adagio 
HAYDN Trumpet Concerto 
VIVALDI The Four Seasons 

CITY OF LONDON SINFONIA IAN WATSON cond 
ANDREW WATWNSON vtolln/director 
MAURICE MURPHY trumpet 

S950, SUMO. S17JH\ 519.50. S22.50 

TUESDAY 29 DECEMBER at 7 JO P» 

^ ■ w a aTV/tn 


TUESDAY 29 DECfcMiMJA « 

© OPERA GALA NIGHT 

with DENNIS O’NEILL 

. . ,, until hi* ouuratlc favourites Inc. 


VV IU A ^ — 

liraml March. 

SUZANNE MURPHY - ^tiyruna 

Sin.5U.SI4 SCI. 521. 52i 


WEDNESDAY 30 DECEMBER ** 7J0p m 

© TCHAIKOVSKY 

gala night 

. .. rtmikeafBfblMtfaimiirjyear 


"."WSS"” 

Andante Cnntabile • Capricao u&uen 

ROYAL PHIUJAKMONrc O^IKTOA 


SUNDAY 3 JANUARY at 7 J0 p m 


@ Overture t Coriolan 

Piano Concerto No.5, Emperor 
c— «K«nv No. 6. pastoral 


_ aoo toncerro 

Symphony No.6, Pastoral 

ROYAL PHBLHARMONICORCHESntA 

ADRIAN LEAPER conductor PIHO lanl P'-»™ 

...... r-i-.cn (.ldrtll s22.SU 


CINEMAS 


CUBZOM KATMOI Cungft 

•Aiaiah D TcL 


CUtZON PHOCN 1 * » 

crow RU- 

SSSra. prej»« ^ ®*°* 

gsTa-so. c -oo * ajo 

euitzoN wn bw Mg; 

AV* W1 cm *59 4908 ■»*» 


M 


DTrt. 

ml 200. 8.30. 9-SO 


S&jWSRA 

nwrnm I.IB.3.4B.6» S*Mp 


W— to 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 
at the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

Box OfQce/CC 071-928 8800 


SUNDAY 13 DECEMBER aft 7 JO pm 




BACH Christmas Oratorio Opening Chorus; Air on a G Suing: 
GOUNOD Ave Maria; HANDEL Ombra Mai Fu (Largo); 
Messiah (excerpts); Arrival of the Queen of Sheba; 
FRANCK Panls Angelicus: ADAM The Holy City; 
CLARKE Trumpet Suite; PURCELL Trumpet Tune & Air, 
BIZET Agnus Dei: SCHUBERT Ave Maria: 

Carol* for Choir, Boys Choir and Audience 

CONCERT ORCHESTRA PHILIP SIMMS corid 
JOHN GRAHAM-HALL ten CRKPIAN STEELE-PERKINS tpt 
Tbomw Tates OjIt, Boys Choir of Bug* House School, Rktas&nd 

5650. 5950. 512-50. SI 650. 518.54, 521 


SUNDAY 27 DECEMBER at 3.15 & 7 JO 

JOHANN 



The tradlllonal Viennese welcome to the New Year with glorious 
musk of the Strauss family, Inc. Tales from the Vienna Woods, 
Annen Polka. Roses from the South. Champagne Polka, Pesther 
Czardas. Sped Galop. Kadetzky March. Blue Danube Waltz. 
Triisdr-Tratsch Polka. Elfen a Magyar. Aquareflen Waltz. Jockev- 
Polka, Wiener Blue Waltz. Moullnct Polka, Thunder & Ughtnlng 
Polka. Pizzicato Polka. Wiener Blue Waltz & many more. 
JOHANN STRAUSS ORCHESTRA 
JOHN BRADBURY dlrector/vloUn ANN MACKAY sop 
JOHANN STRAUSS DANCERS In period costume 

GERALDINE STEPHENSON choreographer 
57 50. 59.50. 51350. 51650. 51850 <3.15 peril 
Sa50.S1150.S1550.S1850.S21 (750 peril 

1 January: NOTTINGHAM ROY AL CENTRE 0602 482626 

2 January: CROYDON FAIRFIELD HALL 081 688 9291 

3 January. NORWICH THEATRE ROYAL 0603 630000 


at the ROYAL ALBERT HALL 

Box Office: 071-689 8212 
Tkfcetmaater: 071-379 4444 (Bitg Fee) 


CHRISTMAS EVE at 7 pm 



In the splendour of the Royal Albert Hall a joyous 
Christmas celebration featuring great traditional favourites 
including SCHUBERT Ave Maria: HANDEL Excerpts from 
Messiah: The Twelve Days of Christmas, Jingle Bells, 
Greensieeves; ALBINONI Adagio; PACHABEL Canon; 
BACH Shepherds Farewell and a host of carols for all. 


LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
PHILIP SIMMS cond ADRIAN THOMPSON tenor 
AMBROSIAN SINGERS. TRINITY BOYS CHOIR 
THE GREAT ORGAN OF THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL 


5650. 5850. 8 1 250. 5 1550. S 1950 


& 


SOUTH BANK 

Tel/CC 071-928 8800 10am to 9pm daily • ‘ tr - 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL I 


5 DbC 

xooa 

730 


IUSSD HOSPITAL CHOWS' CAROL CONCERT 
Chwtes Fwncpwba (cond) Ht> Clwlr Burtw. bn Cunw lotg) 
Caron ft Chremas iruHc. 3JKt C12.E10.tB.tS.CS: 
730-.£t*£l2£t0XS.r7 MafcxAnSargM Career Fund for CtnOiwn 


SUI 
6 Dec 
750 


ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Paul Daniel (Cond) 
i Q tat ml e (peromon) Britten Die Yowg Pe ml Guide » 
k d teeti a ; Mergard Fora Change, eoncenolor muBt-ooreugaon 


EwteK 

SieOrcii 


Mon 7 
Tbel 
Dec 
7 J0 


Rawten prcml; Stmvlnekf Peeuetitt. £255l9Xi*.Cl0.tS RPOLid 


THE LONDON PtULHAKUOMIC Resktenlai HFK. 
Bernard ha)thk< conductor) 

Heart Sytnphanv NO 30. Hahtar Symphottv Nal 
E20t na E7. M tOM-YJ London 


Wad 
IDv 
7 JO 


PHtUtARMOfUA ORCHSSTRA Oeua Pater Bor (cond) 

5 Butock. S Blokley, G Wlnteade. W ShlnwO PhUhermonle 
Chunta. Haydn Skikna Concertam OoM Baethcnran Symotany 
Kx9(Chotaq £28. £22. g!7. CIO. CS Pruttanrenu LM 


The 
10 Da 
rjo 


ROYAL PHILHAHMONtC ORCHESTRA Stephen Cteobury 
^^mmammpmBmMIge umverelty 


Ffi 

11 Dec 

LOO 


(conductor) King'* College Boye' Choir. Cam _ _ 

Muskal society. Verdi To Daunt Ruder Gicrm: HazaB Oinsnas 
MCOtey: and Onatmaa Carete. £25. £19. £1 J. CIO. £5 RPOLM 
FAHHJT CHRtSTHAS IHNK Emeat Reed Sym Orch, 

P Surit (comlt N Long icond.com™mfltori. Wegner Prelude. 
Lohengm (Act Mil. Gerahwirt Amerton m Parts. Tctulkoveky 
Nutcracker Sum Carote. C15, £12. £9 50. £EJ0. £4 SO ERUA 

I QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


7 Dec 

7.45 


PURCELL: UDO AND AENEAS Itea ged) The Bach 


Fatehml. Dene Jotm, Wgal U 
D« rid Wrey.Totn H» 

£21, £15. £10 lONLY| 


I Smith, 


Da rid Wray. Toro Hawfcas (dWJ ante re-eorwrwaed lost prologue 
‘ M5.£ir “ 


TUe 
■ Dec 
7AS 


The En^sh Bach FewmalTruat 

LONDON SINPONIETTA Happy Return*. Lother Zegr on a k 


(cond| Lu t eala w a W Cham 1: Femaytiough Careen dknenaanc 1; 
~ ' ' & Tuesday [pro mi: Abrahamaen MSrcbentrlder. 


Torn* Monday l . _ 

BHoteMeSAjuiyAa. E16X13J10J750 


Srio ni eta Pnxt, LM 


Wed ACADEMY OF ST aUMTIN Hi THE REUS CHORUS 


• Dec 
7JS 


Freude; Barber Three Raincamahone. DM 

‘ _ _ 0.&.CS 


Loario HaRay (ccnducmo John Blich (organ 

_ . _ - - — “pjfr. Britton Rejoice m trie 


Lante, KodHyl 


■ Brens Cl 1. £850. 


ASM10n»)L«i 


Thu 
10 Dr 
7AS 


ROBERT LEVM itortepdno) kdemaHonal PtonoSmiaa. 
Schubert Sonora in D. D 650: 

Beethoven Sonate In B (Ibl Op. 106 (Hammetaariefl. 

' Cia.nqCB.e6 Hwocn/PanonUdSBC 


FH 

11 Dec 
I JO 6 
7AS 


HEARTSTONE 

Stakumari (ttenceri Heater A (mantel art or Muoy Thai) Gllbarl 
Bteerien {pmat. 7 45cm orTy) A ptogrammo ol rtemailonal aru and 
aAure 1 JOpnt tS. C3. 7 45pnr. £6. £4 (Cones) 


Royal Philharmonic Orchestra 

ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 
TOMORROW at 730 pm 

EVELYN GLENNIE 

performs 

NORGARD For a Change: 

Concerto for Percussion & Orch. (London Prem) 
Concert also includes: 

BRITTEN Young Person's Guide 
10 the Ondiestra 

STRAVINSKY Petrushka (1947) 

Conductor PAUL DAN ILL 

Tickets £5-£25 Bos Office/CC 07 1-928 8800 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 
THURSDAY 17 DECEMBER at 730 pm 


Goldsmiths Choral Union 

Carols for Choir & Audience 

BRIAN WRIGHT conductor 
CLIFFORD BENSON. ANTONY SAUNDERS pianos 
CHRISTOPHER BOWERSBROADBENT organ 
, 522. SIS. S 14. S10. 57. S5 Box Office/CC 071-928 8800 
Promoted by Goldsmiths Choral Union 
Concert Agents Norman McCann 
International Artists Ltd 


m 

!««i 


Stnday 
6 Dec 
1150 am 
KBr tearing 
time 


DOHUS. JC BacWHozart Concerto lor P*mo & auwqs m G Kltn r 
Moaarfc Pane Owrai iNo Ji p E Os arte* Owtfm to Pano I Wrd 
K45? 1st pvhse pmr t or mm m modam toner R Strausa. P«no 
QuBilH n C mw« os 13 

£11. £9 C7 CS C6ntote»<ir MW U a iteaBmate 


Sunday 

SDK 

«J)0 pm 
NB: raring 


Monday 
7 Dae 
750 pm 


Tuaaday 
(Dec 
7 JO pm 


Warlnantey 
9 Dae 
7 JO pm 


Thuraday 
10 Dec 
7 JO pa 


Fnttay 
11 Dec 
7 JO pm 


Saturday ' 
12 Dec 
7 JO pm 


15 mil' IUILI.IILL lull. 

Snmtev Homing CeHaa CenearVTandar is the North. 


Haydn: 5cmu « C mnoi MXV1 20 Orlag: Tmoo Lync Pieces hem 
- - - Uapfate ‘ “ 


O Sms « £ nuw Op 7 Utah I 


Ho 1 

Hi Ottyi oroaamme & x43at dwmi nieg 

IBS ENSEMBLE. KgjjgBI BSE mhUFMORATTVE 8611168 1 


Repeating Feure Hamorlal Concert ol lOOS- Yvonna Kenny 
soprano Fi 


eUciiy Palmar m«::o Adrian Thompson tenor lan 
Bream pans Faurd: Pane Ouanatt Oo J5 & Op U 12 uwxfca 
Sd geC^)24 Tnameei V jiudais Go 73. £12 EiQ. C8 tt NCS 


OUNDULA JANOmrZ Bccranol 
CHARLES SPENCER Evtsmd 
lOato Raopmung FeadvaL 
Lredet n Brahma S Streuad^H 
'all SEATS SOUI qW I 


I1H0UAS ALLEN Mr. ROGER VIGNOLES or >0 TamtertetoaNutfL 
Baathovan: An j« lama Gaiama Ct>88 Wolf: B Works L-eoor 
M yaifu ei u. Scots, pv me Sea Scuta ov PemraomStegar. Almtia. 
BodmoAGnag.iTia ty E Satotoom S 30 emi CIS 50 CIO T SO 
— omeauai Sponsor 3sarcmgvBi<aEna«oaB>n)ipn Ltneon 

ATR1CE HARRISON CENTENARY CONCERT. JlllUfl Uoyd 

i Write ado John Lanahan oaw Brttsen: S^ola OofiS Irefand: 
Sonaa G nwnr. Bgan Coho Concerto uteom -mu Dauus: Sonata 


Dvorak: Songs m> Moinoi taug m me- Rimrity-Kortaunr 1 Crura 
: PQHoral A Heal Cii 19 EY ES Parma Garvey IAd 
v Tendar la 


Sog^SargsgranBiA vHaaEB^s i i 

toe North- Motart 2 oonci Stewbart So to gMnaMt. Node uK 
Totonc. Grefena" om Ssmzsc. im Fnhwig- A SanlnteK « Dream 
SencK Grieg: Sams Song 3 rona Barg-. 7 Eany Songs iTih by 
E E od e n uij n 6 JC' prm no CB £S C* Sponsor- BntwiAinmvs 


HOWARD esano 

iBeaBww re Etwa Vanadont 0pJ5 BchianAnn; Camavgi Op 9- 
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TOnlnom LAMslieua 

CIS. £10 CS £6 Jane Pray 


S0F1E U0N OTTER mauc BBBST . 

Tentoc la lha North. WoH: UMw Lodor BrtBart Cobami Songs 
Sanr by Koch. Stanhammar. Pataraon-Berger. RangalrAm. 
HaqLMuB, FryhMII Alfvan. ALL SEATS SOLD iiolums onM 

Soonaorsrt by 5unana..6<j Era-oaa Bare jn Lerrton 


Royal Philharmonic Orchestra 

CHRISTMAS 

CONCERTS 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 
THURSDAY 10 DECEMBER at 7.30 pm 

to include: 

VERDI Te Deuxn 

P OULEN C Hodie Chrlsrus Natus Est 

RUTTER. Gloria 

with Carols for choir and audience 
Conductor STEPHEN CLEOBURY 

Organ DAVID GOODE 

THE CHOIR OF KING’S COLLEGE, 
CAMBRIDGE 

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY 

Tickeis 0-L25 Box Office/CC 071-9^8 8800 


BARBICAN HALL 
MONDAY 14 DECEMBER at 7.30 pm 

HANDEL Messiah 

Conductor JANE GLOVER 
JUDITH HOWARTH SALLY BURGESS 


NEIL MACKEE ALASTAIR MILES 
HUDDERSFIELD CHORAL SOCIETY 

Sponsored by Kodak Limited 

Tickets />£25 Box Officc/CC 071-638 8891 


Christmas with 

THE HANOVER BAND 

and guest artists 

GUNDULA JANOWITZ 

Richard Edgar-TVilson Patrick Godfrey 
with the boys of Latymer Upper School 

THURSDAY 10 DECEMBER 7.30pm 
THE GROSVENOR CHAPEL, MAYFAIR, WI 
Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, Corelli 

TICKETS from Box Office 071-924 1414 
Gnan £12.50. Concert ft edetneion mpper £63 


GRAND HALL, WEMBLEY CONFERENCE CENTRE 
Saturday 12 December ax 3.00 pm and 7.30 pm 

CAROLS FOR CHRISTMAS 

with audience participation 

or aid q f Guy's Evelina Children '* Hospital Appeal 
QSLYN FI-TJS harp TRISTAN FRY percussion 
MALCOLM HICKS organ 

ENGLISH BAROQUE CHOIR LONDON ORIANA CHOIR 
LONDON PRO ARTE CHOIR LONDON BRASS 
Hatentabcr'e Ackre* School Boys' Choir ■ Hrar Tooth Jta Orebcazre 
BJE.T. Choir Boy of the Tear 1991/92 

LEON LOVETT conduaor 

.fern it V, £i 5*' ill irtMf; vll Ert St i‘l I it (119' Tictei Sec 
Chgvioi Crexeis 21 FarhiJe. Un-NTT Uf >yr « B.1 08. "?1 -»X» 12M 



BARBICAN HALL 


071-633 38V1 9&w-Sp« daily 


ni.xcarB 















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ART GALLERIES 


Royal Aeadeeny ®f Artm, Ptcca- 
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foka laeal 


OPERA & BALLET 


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THE ROYAL BALLET 
Tom 7 jo The praam 
/Tataa of Baaote tatter. 
THE ROYAL OPEBA 

Tua 7.30 


SADLBTS WHit OTl-278 89X6 

Fl« Can 24 lire 7 ten 240 7200 


Firs Can 24 lira 7 dears 240 1 

LOI0ON CMTBMMmr ■ 
DANCE THEATRE late 2 pete 
Today ago to 7.30 


THEATRES 


ADEL9M071 856 7611 CC 071 
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24hr cc 071 497 9977 (no hko 
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MUST END IS JAM 10*3 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

NUbtty at T JO Mata Wed 
u 250 it Sal 4.90 at a.oo 


TOVWr fftirvlay Ezpreaa 


SUNSET BOULEVARD 

DKNS XM JUNE 1003 
Unforteaiaaaly dekata ea not 


BOOtOMO WILL Oral OH 
17th JANUARY 1993 


071467 1 1 10/867 

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amilM 950 6123/413 352^ 

STAN Mats 

hi NOEL COWARD'S 

HAY FEVER 


IT'D .Mail 


WONDOFULLY WITTY- D. Exp. 
Evea Bam Thu A Bat mate 3pm 


AlOWYCH B/O CC 836 6404 (Blae 

cc 7 day 24hr No tec) 497 9977 

Best Comedy Of The Year 

C Standard Award £v 8 Max So: 4 


Of 

LITTLE VOICE 

Jhn Cartwright 

id by Sam Jwidaa 


ALOWYCH BO/CC 071 836 6404 
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Fro«n 22 Feb for a limited S iaaa n 


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FROM A JACK 
TO A KING 


Time Out 
A reck Y> rcO rarva tram me 
creator te T e i bldde n Hanaf 
Monday - Tlumday 8.1S 
Friday A Saturday 5.30 * 8JO 
All Seats £9.50 Friday 6 JO 


APOLLO VICTORIA SS cc 630 
6262 Groups 828 6188 CC 24tir 
071 344 4444/497 9977 
07 1 379 9901 Drama 930 6123 
THE NEW 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Music by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyrics by RICHARD STTLGOE 
Directed by TREVOR NUNN 
-tdpml by JOHN NAPIER 
awrsosrsptiy by 
ARLENE PHILLIPS 
Wblte knurklr test runs 
19.45 deny. Tde « Ste 15.00 
Tickets from £9.00 - £27 J O 
■BOMBAY 7TH Pe CCMBOl 
Cunatzi up at 8 JOpm as tbc cate 
wla be rtteMno Irian the stags of 
o»e Royal variety Performance i 


APOLLO Shanes' A vs. Box Off. cc 
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Mon to Fri 8.16 Sal 6 * 8j45can 

PETER O'TOOLE 
OUR SONG 

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“SMBS WITH SUCCESS** □. MaO 


ARTS. 071 836 2132 CC 413 
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Men - Fri 8 Sat 545 St 8.30 


THEATRES 


AMI* lb* 071836 3534 Par tarn 


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071-577 9629 From Dec 14 
Mon-Sat 10 Wed A Sat 1 1 JO A 3 

SOOTY AT XMAS 


CJUMDOffi 071-379 5299 OC 

071 344 4444 GKBr/na Uo M 

071 407 9977t94nr/bim fea) 
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"Aaaaacasa** Whs 


whars at 

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RETURN TD THE 

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4tt YEARJNi 


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MICHAEL HORDERN 
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TRELAWNY 
OF THE WELLS 

WkwPkaero 

r«by RBoMte 


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MAKING IT BETTER 


and enftdnal b a u ayte" D. Exp 

□teected by Maori Rudinan 

LAST WKK EMM SAT 


C R H B R IO * BO/CC 839 4488 ICC 

24br do fee) 344 4444/r cc mini 

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PATERSON 


MISERY 

Baaed on Stephen Wart nowal 
Written A dir, try Sanon Moore 


cc HOTLINE 071-41* 

1411 C24itrs) ntonmOen 071 
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PAUL NICHOLAS u. 
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London's Create* 

ICmas Spectacnlar Opens Dec 17 
for the Xmas ft New Year Sa a aoa 

utrill February 27. Book Now 

for this Great Family Snow 


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cc <Bkg fee) 24hr 7 days 071.494 

3001/344 4444/240 7200/579 

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MISS SAIGON 

“THE CLASSIC LOVE STORY 
OF OUR TIME” 

MOW M 1TB 

CTH SmSATTONAL Y1AR 

wsn urawa? 

exTunSS 


FOR THffltOK POSTAL 


071 ■ 


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344 4444 too bkg fee)/836 a«28 
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Evea Boas. Wed mat Scan. 

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NOW M ITS 2ND YEAR 
“A SAUCY CO M E D Y - E- Std 


DON'T DRESS 
FOR DINNER 


DUKE OF YOMTS BO/CC 071 
836 5122 836 9637 or (24*01/ 
fee) 071 497 9977/344 4444 





Today II.QOl 2JO ft 700 
F OR T UNE BO ft CC 071 836 
2238 CC 497 9977/344 4444 
<24hr/bk« tee) 379 9901 (bits fM) 
Susan HOTS 

THE WOMAN IN BUCK 

5PKE CHILLER" Guardian 

-A REAL THRILL” S. Times 
“TMca eaRteteaT T. Out 

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naaarrw (O/CC 494 6085 lire) 
/071 344 4444/497 9977 

BEST PUY 

ALL 4 MAJOR AWARDS 1SS1 


CTED PLAY 
N THE WORLD 
-Brian Fri*... Aattedddao* OSup 

DANCING at LUGHNASA 

ra ovar ovary 
alrtto NY Tbnee 


Mon-Sat 8 Mats Tbur 3 Sat_4 


OPERA & BALLET 



A CHRISTMAS 
SEASON 
of ROMANCE, 
DRAMA & 


NRAShMP BSEFKtE DELIGHT 

MIlSiBDriSMRKlROJliaS ‘ ^ *- ± ^ 1 

tm spcsiscinfo s v 


BO/CC 494 8067 /3*4 
Ibtmtea 4979977 Mg MB 

.. . . Jw praB d tehte ^ E Std 
Ana Carteret Mi c ru a t Demon 
Hanoab Gordon Dukrts Gray 
u-H f Shaw David YaUand 

OBCA* waors 

A N .IDEAL HUSBA ND 

■hteTto'bar a path to 
dM Otoho" 8. Tsebps 
E ves 7 j 4S hftds T»w LOSM4D 


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an 980 8800 <tac « no bkstee) 

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ROBERT LINDSAY as 
CYRANO 
DE BERGERAC 


far JOrt H WRU 

ELUAMjmRMW 


Eva T JO Wed ft Ste MMs gJO 


SWARD WlHNHfi IEU»CAL 

THE PHANTOM OF 
THE OPERA _ 

Dtrerted by HAROLD P*Mt«E 
Eves 745 Mate Wed ft Bat 3 

APPLY DAILY FOR MTiaW 


UHL fALLADRIM SOM-BO cc Cl 
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v Lloyd WoU 
Blredrhuorer- can 

JOSEPH & THE AMAZING 
TECHNICOLOR 


DREAMCOAT 

Starring PHRXte SChOfiWD 
Dir by STEVEN PBHLOTT 
tra 7 JO Mate Wad ft Bat 2.30 
NOW BOOJONO TO MA Y 1st 
QUEUE DAILY FOB RETURNS 
MOMMY 7TH UBCEM8BR 
Curtain no at 8.15pm as Om cm 

arm ba rutoitaa tram the stage or 

Ba gjwl Variety Par te rmanca j 


LYRIC. Shafte team Bo ft cc 071 

494 5045 CC 071 344 4444 AO M 

Bata 24tar/7 days Ibta tee), 
cc 497 9977 On* 071 930 6133 

The Jotat Mavar Seopa Jtenpto 

FIVE GUYS 


THE OUVm AWARD 
WntMNQ MUSICAL 

SftQ QUEST YEAR 
MCB-Thu 8 Fri ft BM M 6 ft 8^5 

BOOKING UNTIL END APR -93 

APPLY DAILY FOR RETURNS 


NATIONAL THEATRE BO 071 92S 
ZZS2 am 071 620 0741: 24hr cc 
bkg tea 071 497 9977 
OLIVIER 

Today 2.00 ft 7.15 FVOMALJON 
by Straw. Mon 7.15 SQUARE 
ROUNDS a new (bead-e piece 
by T ony H anteon 
LYTTELTON 

Today 2.16 ft 7 JO Men 7 JO 
(PREVIEWS) CA ROUS EL 
by fteJy ni end H aiumnatelu 
COTTESIOE 

Today 4.00 ft B.OO Mon &00 


a new play by David Stew 


HEW LONDON Drury Lane 80 
071 405 0072 CC 071 404 4079 
241B-344 4444. Croupe 930 6123 
Tkte from: Tower Re c or ds Ldn. 
THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
fTS. ELIOT INTERNATIONAL 
AWARD- WINNING MUSICAL 

CATS 

Eves 7.46 Mats Tde ft Sal 3.00 
LATECOMERS NOT ADMIT 
TED WHILE AUCTTOIUUM B IN 
MOTION. PLEASE BE PROMPT. 

B ara open at 6.48 
LHNTBD NO. OF SEATS AVAIL 
DAILY FROM SOX OinCS 
Contact B.O. ter datBlfe of 


OLD VIC 071 928 7616 OC 24br 
f7 day/ no bkg fee 071 344 
4444/071 497 9977/379 9901 
OSCAR HAMMERSTE1N ITS 

CARMEN JONES 

Music taw Hsac 
□Heeled by Sanon DBm 
WINNER OF 5 MAJOR 
AWARDS I niuNng 

BEST MUSICAL 

0S«lar Aanda 1BB2 
NOW BOOK0M TO MARCH UBS 
Eves 7.45 Mate Wed ft sal 3otn 


FALACI THEATR1 071-434 0909 
cc 24tas (bkg tee) 071-344 

4444/497 9977/379 9901 

Group Sales 071 930 61Z3 


THE 


Own Q7 1 494 IfillH 
WORLD'S MOST POPULAR 


LES MISERABLE 

Evas 7 JO Mats Tim ft M 2J0 


NOW SO OMNB THRU (ffT S3 

LIMITED NJ\ OF SEATS AVAR. 

DAILY FROM BOX OFFICE 
Additional Xmas pate now avafl. 

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PHOBUX BO/CC 867 1044 857 
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ALL • MAJOR AWARDS 1981 
WILLY RUSSELL'S 


BLOOD BROTHERS 

•tanfciaKBCI ME 
■Ml OWL WAYNE 

S I 


PICCADILLY BO 867 11 ID cc 
071 344 4444/497 9977/867 
ill 1CAD 24br no bka fee) 
Oroups 413 3321/240 7941. 


THE OPERAMUGICAL 

• WHICH WITCH * 


A Powerful Story 
of Romantic Peaskm 
Mon-Sai 7 jo Mat TTui ft Sat 2JO 


CALL 071-481 1920 
To place your eniertainmeni 
advert in THE TIMES 


4444/497 QgrTgB^ S 0 . 6135 

OF a FAROT D.T«teg ry>»i f 
DICKINSON 


(HIAYLE 


WLL 


«^Y COONE Y 
KM 

mi rail WEE 
-THE E»T COMIC TEA M 
at TOW7T Spectator 

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KAY COONEY 

'ANM5&KMJSEraM?EV£hl 


teaghtar* D. Exd 

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PRINCE OF WALE* 839 8997. 
r-rwHi Cards 94hr 497 9977 

...entkZng peraonobtta end begs 
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Irvtno Berlin's “beat -ever 
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ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

“SCORES A HTT Evening Std 


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SLATTERY 

RADIO TIMES 

-A anchor- Time Out 

THE IDEAL MUSICAL 

Sunday Tuna 
Mon-Fri 7 JO 

Mats Thur 2JO Sat 4.30 ft 8.00 


ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 
COMPARY LONDON (071 638 
8891 CC Mon • Sun 9 am -U WWI 
BARBICAN THEATRE 

NtD ^E^ a TB2?gr o, 

Today 2X0 A 7.15 
THE PIT: 

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Today 2.00 ft 7.15 
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THEATRE 

ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA 

the Ntamtr wvves of 

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THE OTHER PLACE: 

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Today 1.30 

Msai/nckat/Hotel packaga 

07B9 414999. 


ROYAL COURT 071 730 1745 
/26S4 cc 836 2428/5122 
THREE UtDS AUaHTHM ON 
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BEST MUSICAL 

Cuaoaio Standard Award* 1992 

KISS OF THE 
SPIDER WOMAN 

-A TRIUMPH DEEPLY 

MOVPW Otaarver 

Rrara 8 ^.‘2SaSrSfTO8- 

Dta-ecMd by KaroM Pitec a 




HOP. ADJACENT TO 


ST MARTHTS 071-836 1443. 
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4 lot Year ofAjanaJJirloMe-o 


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tap bkg tew n 344 4444 ibkp fee) 

MAUREEN ROSEMARY 
UPMAN KARRIS 

‘A MAflSC COMRB£ATKHTD.Moll 

NEIL SIMON’S 
LOST IN YONKERS 

Directed by DAVID TAYLOR 
Titei dWi l ia aiy, rae h dhr a a d... 
UHVBtSAL APPEAL D. Exp 
Mogtel 7 JO Mat Wed-»Sar 2.30 


VAUDEVILLE 071 835 9987/497 
9977/344 4444 Grps 940 7941 
“SHOWS DON’T COME MUCH 
MOM ENJOYABLE THAN 
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Ring Lardnar ft 
George S Kaufman'* 

JUNE MOON 

** m A OEM ” S. Times 
Evas 7.48 mate Wsd ft Sat 3.00 
SEASON MUST BIO 12 DEC 


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BUDDY 

T ha Bad dy HoEy Stonf 
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ALL SEATS t PRICE 
FRIDAY 5JO PERF 

4th SENS ATIONA L YEAR 
OVER 1250 PERFORMANCE* 
BOOMN8 THROUGH IBM 


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GERALD WILLIAM 

HARPER OAUNT 

GREO HiaCB_ ANGELA DOWN 


“Thai 


A Mt “Today -Eaealtenr Gdn 

MURDER BY 
MISADVENTURE 

ed 


S Times” A w* 


tha IsodhT LBC Mon-Fri 8.00 
Ste 5.30 ft B.3Q Wed Men 2.30 


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SHCONCADELL _ 

john wells lugw ro K ane 

In (MtAHAM IBlBffT 

TRAVELS WITH 
MY AUNT 

“BMUMNT 


Uan-Fd B wta 3 Sat 8 ft 8.15 


8 December - 2 January 

SADLER S WELLS 

Box Office: 071 278 8916 

First Call: 071 240 7200 r 24hrs/bkg iccl 



YOU NO VIC 071 92S 6363 CC 344 
4444 . uau 9 Jan THE snow 
OU raE-Rn aa dag. ahatoTOT.om 



"DAZZLING 

THEATRICALITY" 


CHARLES SPENCER. 
DAILY TELEGRAPH 


KISS 


OfTitf SPIDfD 

woAfin 

Ttt f nUSICflL 


% 


VICTOR HOCHHAU5ER presents 


SIX NEW YEAR MUSI C & DANC E SPECTACULARS 

1 ROYAL ALBERT HALL : 


T1CKK IM ASTKR ( 





TUESDAY 29 DECEMBER al 7^0 


TCHAIKOVSKY GALA 
OF MUSIC & DANCE 


WEDNESDAY 30 DECEMBER at 7.30 


National Symphony Orchestra Cond- CEM MANSUR 
s Band ol the Honourable Anflety Company 

Pane: NICHOLAS WALKER 

l Pnndpafc Ol me BIRMINGHAM ROYAL BALLET : 
5 Suite. SWAN LAKE* 

I >£-■■ MARCHE SLAVE 
rTTPIANO CONCERTO No.1 in 8b minor 
l A CAPRICCIO ITAUEN 

l Sutte. THE NUTCRACKER* 


GRAND 
CLASSICAL GALA 


j-f* 


OVERTURE '1812' 
CANNON & MORTAR EFFECTS 
AND EXCITING LASERS 


National Symphony Otcfasaa Conti DAVID COLEMAN 
Malcolm Sargort; Fssrrai CSo--' 

Fanfare Trumpeters c* me COHStean Guaics 
Tenor BONAVENTURA BOTTONE 
MENDELSSOHN F^rjCa* VE RDI Cn pr.sy re 
Hebrew Slaws RAVEL 3o*u DONBEm U' , a , -—-'3 
laprana ELGAR Pa-rp & Ci'jjTsarce ORFF 0 s--'a 
CARUMA BURANA VAUGHAN WILLIAMS G'8&-S'ee.C-S 
DUKAS Stwaref? fiapvcu. PUOTNi E e 

WAGJEBaoeaimeVa')i,f«s HANDEL na * . a" Z~u - a ; 

t MESSIAH VERDI KHACHATURIAN 

> Satoe Dance. STRAUSS Rasesiy Karen VERDI la «' 
mob*. HANDEL fjfctc *e Raja; P.»F*r^s 


■ V THURSDAY 31 DECEMBER at 7.30 

GRAND OPERA GALAS 

' ■ With FOUR GREAT OPERA STARS ' 

Nanonal Symphony Orcnesira Cana: DAVID COLEMAN J 
Mefcoim Sargem Fe&ntgl Ovr j 

Fan (are Trumpeters of tne Grenadier Guards 
Sop SUSAN BULLOCK Mezzo SALLY BURGESS Tenor 
ANTHONY WEE Baritone DONALD MAXWELL 
OkTHEVTJG MAGPIE. Dua LAfOit Chorus of the Hebrew ; 

Staves, Rnate (Ad a NABUCCO. One SnedByMADW ' 
BUTTERFLY. Habanera. Toreador's sons CATOEf Oiwttil 
the mottev I PAUJACCI Pigrlma' Chorus TAf*>HAUSER 
Latga M tsetatun BARBER OF KVUi Duel PCAFUTSHBfi 
E tawvwi ta state TOSCA Anri Chons L TROWrCRE. 
SaKy ewMied my tieeit SAMSCN L DELLW. La dona e 
mobile. Quanto RGOl£TTO.Iiiemi«iD cyWAUERW 
(7U5TCANA Onwttneft Party Scene DC FlEDCfafAUS 


FRIDAY 1 JANUARY at 7.30 


VIENNESE 
NEW YEAR GALA 
OF MUSIC & DANCE 


in BS W W fl arthMSO 

Nanonal Symphony OrchaEtra Caret DAVID COLEMAN 1 
THE STRAUSS BALLET COMPANY* 
JOHANN STRAUSS' Overture, Die Ftedermaus. Voices ! 
ol Spnng Waltz’. Champagne Pofita. Memories ol CovernS 
Garden Waltz. Perpetuuin Mobile'. Emperor Waltz, 
Wiliam Ten Galop. March from the Gypsy Baron. 
Hungarian Pofca'. Pnpoum Ouadrile. Ami Pttika. A 
Thowsand and Or® Nights’. Pnzicau Polka, Radetziw 
March. Explosions Poha-The Blue Danube Wats’ L 
WALDTEUFEL: Emana Waltr. Shaiere 1 WaRz j 

LEHARTGoWSSUverWate 


V. ITH EXCITING FIREWORKS 
SPECTACULAR LASERS 


■ A v/; 


Marc.i AIDA-Nessun dormaTURANDOT 


and some surprises... 


if! 


"SPIDER SCALES 
THE HEIGHTS 

...a show that 
sacrifices neither 
a serious subject 
to entertainment nor 
entertainment to a 
serious subject, 

A FEAT TO RESPECT 
AND ENJOY" 


BENEDICT NIGHTINGALE. 
THE TIMES 




i^S-w 



^ ) SUNDAY 27 DECEMBER at 7.30 

yXpSCOW CIT(Y /ALLEr 

EXCITING COMPANY 0? 80 DANCERS 
WiTH GUEST STAR OF THE SOtSHOi BALLET SVETLANA FIUPPOYA 
IN A SPECTACULAR FULL-LENGTH PRODUCTION OF 

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY 

"Classical Ha l let at iLs best " 


MON 28 DECEMBER at 7.30 


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r TLAMENCA | I 

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7 



16 


SATURDAY TELEVISION AND RADIO 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


BBC1 


7.00 Champion the Wonder Horse (b/w) (r) (2659495) 

7-25 News and weather (7953143) 

7 JO Spider. Musical cartoon (r) (3) (4811037) 7.35 Animal World. 
Nature senes with Derek Griffiths (s) (7653785) 7.45 Quick Draw 
McGraw. Cartoon western (r) (4809393) 7 JO Liter Bits. Cartoon 
fun with the forest pixies (r) (7331308) 8.15 Chucktevtston. More 
madness and mayhem with Paul and Barry (s) (2642230) 8X5 
Bucky O’Hare. Animated adventures with the floppy -eared super- 
hero (r) (1447211) 

9.00 Going Live! Sarah Greene and Phillip Schofield are joined by Adam 
Woodyatt and June Brown of EastEnders. WWF wrestling star 
Randy Savage and Marky Mark (s) (78846018) 12.12 Weather 
(13206501 

12.15 Grandstand introduced by Sieve Rider. The line-up is (subject to 
iteration); 1220 Football: Bob Wilson and Gary Lineker look 
forward to me weekend's action, 12X5, 125 and 2.00 Racing from 
Chepstow: the Arlington Premier Chase (1.00). the Jack Brawn 
Handicap Chase (1.30). and the Rehearsal Chase (2.05); 1.10 
News; 1.15 and 1.40 Boxing: Commonwealth rrudcfleweight 
champion Richie Wood hall takes on Arthur Serwanol; 2.15 Skiing: 
Men's Downhill Championship from Val-d'lsere. France; 2.55 and 
3J5 Rugby League live coverage of the second round of the Regal 
Trophy between Warrington and Bradford Northern from 
Wildempoof, 3.45 Football half-times. 440 Final Score (39700308) 

5435 News with Moira Stuart Weather (269T650) 

5.15 Regional news and sport (9417430). Wales: (to 5.50) Wales on 
Saturday 

5 JO Dad's Army. Arthur Lowe, John Le Mesurter and Clive Dunn lead 
the defence of Warming tan-on -Sea against Hitler. Freddie Trueman 
makes a guest appearance when the Wardens challenge the Home 
Guard to a cnc*et match (r). (Ceefax) (8572969J 

5X0 Big Break. Jim Davidson and referee John Virgo are joined by 
Stephen Hendry, who is challenged by Peter Ebdon and Darren 
Morgan. (Ceefax) (si (149650) 

6 JO Noel's House Party. Bill Owen. Peter Sal Its. Ian Smith and Anne 
Charleston join Noel Edmonds, and Cheryl Baker wins a "Gotcha 
Oscar" (s) (673124) 

7.15 Bruce Forsyth’s Generation Game. Four more couples compete 
for the prizes on the conveyor belt. With Rosemarie Ford. (Ceefax) 
(s) (254394) 

8.15 Casualty. Gritty medical drama set in the accident and emergency 
department of a aty hospital. Julian's aid Sandra's affair is 
exposed. (Ceefax) (s) (276765) 

9.05 News with Martyn Lewis (Ceefax) Sport and weather (502747) 



Stand-up comedy: Silverman, Kiser, McCarthy (9 J5pm) 


9J5 Film: Weekend at Bemie’s (1969). Inventive black comedy 
sfamng Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman as insurance 
company employees who become implicated in the murder of their 
boss (Terry Kiser) and try to pretend he is still alive. Directed by Ted 
Koicheff (Ceefax) (si (81136476) 

11.00 Match of the Day. Desmond Lynam introduces highlights of two 
Premier league matches (s) (595650) 

12.15am Film: Gymkata (1985) starring Kurt Thomas as a martial arts 
expert who travels to a strange country on a secret mission. 
Directed by Robert Clouse, but a feeble echo of his Bruce Lee 
movie Enter the Draaon (731341) 

145 Weather (7703761) ' 


VtdaaMus+ and the Video PtusCodes 

The numbers next to each TV programme listing are Video PkisCode™ numbers, 
which allow you to proaramme your video recorder instantly with a VMeoflus+ ni 
handset VideoPluw can be used with most videos. Tap m the Video PhcCode for the 
programme you wish to record For more details call VideoPta on 0839 121 204 (eafis 
chained at 4Sp per minute peak. 36p off-peak] or write 10 VtdeoPtu5+. Acotnex Ltd, 
5 Ivorv House. Plantation Wharf, London SW1 1 JTN Vkteopkm- ("*), Ruscode P“) 
and Video Programmer are trademarks of Gemsur Marketing Ud. 


BBC2 


8.00 Open University; Science Preparatory Maths: Graphs (5423292) 

8.15 Open Advice: Becoming a Student (2631124) 840 Side 
Dreams (1442766) 

9.05 FUm: King's Flow (1941, b/w). A polished saga of earty century 
America featuring Ronald Reagan in one of Ins best roles, as a 
young man who falls in love with a beautiful girl from the wrong side 
of the tracks. Directed by Sam Wood (41158132) 

1 l.os The Folk-Tales of England Kevin Crassfey -Holland tells the story 
of the dragon which caused the Lambton family to be cursed for 
generations (1) (3795143) 

11J5 Bird's Eye View. Sir John Betjeman surveys the varying homes of 
the English (r) (1466747) 

12.15 Film: Stagecoach (1939. b/w). The classic John Ford western 
which finally brought stardom to John Wayne. He plays a fugitive 
who joins a group of stagecoach passengers on a perilous journey 

through Indian territory. (Ceefax) (443327) 

1.50 Network East Includes a look at the work of designer Wended 
Rodericks who draws inspiration from the poetry of the Dalai Lama 
(S) (37698921) 

2J0 Tanhaiyan. Episode seven of the 13-part Pakistani drama. In Urdu 
with English subtitles (427521 1) 

3.00 The Ice Puppy. A documentary fbDowtng the harp seal's struggle 
for survival (5898018) 

3.10 Rbn: They were Expendable (1945, tvw) 

• CHOICE This story of American motor torpedo boats in the 
Pacific during the second world war is one of the less regarded films 
In the John Ford canon yel it contains some of his finest and most 
characteristic work. It is far from the traditional Hollywood war Mm. 
There is gloiy but glory in defeat, not victory. There are stirring battle 
scenes but the emphasis is on the men as human beings, their 
courage and their fear. It is a theme touched with poetry. Robert 
Montgomery plays the commander, with John Wayne as his 
second-in-oommand, and the Ford stock company Is represented 
by Ward Bond and Russell Simpson. Among many notable scenes 
is one in the hospital where the men gather round the bedside of a 
dying comrade. It is beautifully judged and played, rich in emotion 
but never sentimental (59558874) 

5J0 Scrutiny News from the House of Commons Select Committees. 
(Ceefax) (B56321 1). Wales: Wales in Westminster 

5.50 Pole to Pole. The continuation of Michael Palin's journey From 
North to South (r). (Ceefax) (327308) 

6.40 News with Moira Stuart. Sport and weather (779476) 

655 Nell Kinnock: The Lost Leader. The former leader oF the Labour 
party talks to David Dlmbleby. (Ceefax) (515921) 

735 Music On Two: Song ol the Night The life and music of the Polish 
composer Karol Szymanowski (960358) 

835 Have I Got News for You. Jo Brand and Neil Kinnock join Paul 
Merton, Ian Hislop and Angus Deayton (r) (s) (404230) 



Tragic couple: Gemma Jones and Anton Rodgers (935pm) 


9.05 Performance: After the Dance 

• CHOICE: Here's a novelty, a play by Terence Rafflgan which has 
apparently not been performed since its original London run in 
1939. It was poorly received by critics and public and Flanigan 
virtually disowned it. Perhaps with the second world war looming 
theatregoers were not in the mood for the downbeat theme. After 
the Dance is set in idle rich London and is about a couple of former 
bright young things (Anton Rodgers and Gemma Jones) who are 
now neither bright nor young. Their 15-year-old marriage Is a sham 
and both are heavily into drink. Enter a pert 20-year-old (Imogen 
Stubbs) who falls in love with the husband and tries to put him back 
on the straight and narrow. Despite some brittle comedy this is a 
bleak and tragic piece which offers no easy solutions. Stuart 
Burge's production does it full justice (47463582) 

1130 Him: The Watchmaker of St Paul (1973). The season of classic 
French films continues with this Simenon tale of a watchmaker 
(Philippe Noiret) who teams that his son is wanted for murder. A 
distinguished debut for director Bertrand Tavernier (813414) 
12.45am Saturday Night Live. Actress Catherine O'Hara hosts the 
variety-comedy show (641 1952). Ends at 1 JO 


I TV LONDON 


630 TV-am (5851143) ^ ^ _ fJ1 _ 

935 What's Up Doc? Andy Crane, Pat Sharp an d Yvet te FtekDng are 
joined by Darmii Minogue and Les HBI (s) (34872768) 

11. 30 A Conversation wtth Magic. Basketball star Magic Johnson 
retired from the Los Angeles Lakers after teaming that he had 
contracted the HW virus. He talks about Aids to an audience of 
children aged eight to 14 (8495)_ 

1230 Tl»nv Chart Show featuring BoneyM performing ’Marys Boy 
Child" (S) (64308) 

1.00 News with Dermot Mumaghan. Weather (11758898) 1.05 LWT 
News (1 1 757969) 

1.10 Euro pew Champions' League Special Ian St John and Jimmy 
Greaves present the second programme in their new series 
highlighting the battle for places m this season's European Cup final 
(93511414) 

1.40 smoker Coverage of the first round matches of the Coalite World 
Matehpiay Championship from the Dome in Doncaster (97788389) 
4.1a Dinosaurs. Prehistoric puppet Show. When the chief elder dies. 

Earl finds himself as one of the candidates to take over as leader (s) 

(8760768) 

440 News with Dermot Mumaghan. Weather (3956263) 530 LWT 
News (5631637) 

535 Cartoon Time (2893018) 

5.15 Beverly Hills, 90210. Teenage Angst wtth the impossibly lovely 
pupils of a Cafifomia high school. Dylan becomes involved wtth a 
fellow AA member: and Jim gets hooked on karaoke. [Oracle) (s) 
(9765389) 

635 Gladiators. Final of the energetic high-tech version of It’s a 
Knockout introduced by IHrika Jonsson and John Fashanu. 
(Oracle) (s) (582303) 

7.05 Bind Dale. Cifla Black plays Cupid to more contestants with 
romantic ambitions and discovers how last week's winners farad. 
(Oracle) (S) (428056) 



The best of British humour host Jonathan Ross (835pm) 

8.05 British Comedy Awards 1992 introduced by Jonathan Roes five 
from the London Television Centre. Neil Kinnock. Margi Clarke and 
Michael Elphick are among the celebrities who wai be bestowing 
honours an the winners (7974521 1) 

1035 Beadle's About Compilation of some of the more elaborate 
practical jokes Jeremy Beadle has played on unsuspecting 
members of the pubfic (555124) 

10J35 News with Dermot Mumaghan. Weather (923563) 

1 035 Snooker. The concluding frames of today's first-round matches of 
the Coalite World Matehpiay Championship from the Dome in 
Doncaster (60812563) 

1230am Almost Grown. The people at a party 20 years ear Her reunite 
under different circumstances (23148) 

130 The Big E. Magazine programme for and about yowg Europeans 
(s) (8825761) 

230 Indy Car Racing 1991. Toyota Monterey Grand Prix (80438) 

335 New Music. Pop videos and interviews (7658544) 

435 The Hit Mai and Her. Pete Waterman and MichaaJa Strachan with 
the latest news from the dub scene (s) (4498186) 

530 ITN Morning News (64761). Ends at 6.00 


CHANNEL 4 


630 Heathdifi. Animated adventures (r) 02240) 8) 6J5 Eu nwta^ 
Castle. Music and cartoons for the under-fives M (5 J 35327) 635 
Kideo. Gravity. 13-part guide to life (Teletext) (s) 113503) 7.25 
«gh 5. Fressiyte skiing (2645292) 735 Trans Wortd Sprat 
International sporting news (4130698) 

930 News summary (4929785) 9.15 Racing: The Morning Une 

1030K«bbadL Men's final between Punjab and Delhi (r). (Tetetat) (s) 

(81650) 

1030 Gazzatta Football ttafla. Paul Gascoigne takes hs weekly look at 
the Italian le a ni ng (69018) 

1130 American Football with Gary Imlach and Mick Lucttnrst (1) (6037) 

1230 Sign On: News Watch. A look at some of the tofaartant news 
events of November. With signing and subtitles (40230) 

1230 Songs raid Memories. Meher Mode offers advice to travellers aid 
selects her favourite film songs (76143) 

1.00 The Friend. Russian animation (40556582) 

1.15 Channel 4 Racing from Sandown. Brough Scott introduces the 
following: Heray VIII Novices’ Chase (1-25); Thames Valley Eggs 
Novices' Handicap Hurdle (1.55): WHham Hifl Handicap Hurtfle 
(2.30); Mitsubishi Shogun Tingle Creek Trophy (3.00) (76611245) 
330 FUm: Siege of the Saxons (1963). Medieval romp starring Ronald 
Lewis as an outlaw who saves King Arthur (Mark Dignam) from ihe 
treacherous Edmund of Cornwall (Ronald Howard) and wins the girl 
(Janette Scott). Directed by Nathan Juran (279124) 

5.05 Brootaide. Omnibus edition (r). (Teletext) (s) (3038105) 

630 Right to Reply Viewer John Healy examines the BBC's new 
proposals for accountability and discusses them with BBC governor 
Sir Kenneth Broomfield (Teletext) (s) (698) 

7.00 A Week in Potties. Three conservative MPs with different views on 
Europe right s what each wants to see come out of nad week's 
summit In Edinburgh (1211) 

830 The Big Battalions. Brian Cox and Jane Lapotaire star in the 
drama about faith and fanaticism. The arrival of an American Hm 
star leads Martha and David Into dangerous territory (r) (Teletext) 
(7259) 



A jokey message on safe sex: Morris Glettanan (930pm) 


9.00 Sex 

• CHOICE: A Channel 4 contribution for Aids Awareness Week is a 
spoof documentaiy from Australia m which a fictional interviewer 
(Morris Gteltzman) asks fictional young people about their sex Bves 
and uses the formal to drive home a message about the importance 
of wearing condoms. The programme is clearly based on the theory 
that the best way to pre»ch safe sex is not to be stuffy about It Amid 
the propaganda jokes abound, some of them very funny. One 8 
about the man who was so embarrassed about asking a chemist far 
condoms that he bought the shop. White applaucfing the point of 
the show, traditionalists may baulk at its assumption that for today's 
youngsters falling into bed is as frequent and natural as brushing 
one's teeth. There is no suggestion that sex has anything to do with 
love, and still less with marriage (7495) 

1030 Rhn: Les Vaiseuses (1974) starring Gerard Depardieu and Patrick 
Dewaere as two delinquents joy-riding their way across France and 
taking everything fife has to offer. An exuberant, amoral film, 
directed by Bertrand Blier. In French with English subtitles 
(35434747) 

12.15am Let The Blood Run Free. Spoof medical soap. Mrs Good 
meets a stranger and Dr Lovechihj unveUs his new matron (55S?3) 
12.45 The Happening. Jools Hottend is joined by Start Video, Courtney 
Pine, Lou Rawls, John Moloney. Kit Hoflerbach and Jeremy Hardy 
(s) (949148) 

135 The Word (r) (a) (938032) 

245 FUm: Plan Nine From Outer Space (1958, b/w). Tatty science 
fiction tale, once voted the worst film of ail time, about a man 
fighting against space aliens who raise the dead to fight their 
battles. Directed by Edward D. Wood Jr (7905815). Ends at 435 


SATELLITE 


SKY ONE 


CLOOam Danger Bay (13834) 6L30 Elephant 
Boy (308401 740 Fun Factory (39148531 
1200 Bainaby Jones 1 197221 1.00pm Rim 
Btfic Star (42786) 3.00 Cartoons (87655) 

4.00 Tha Dukes cl Hazard 117940) 5X0 
WWF SifiKfttJra ol Wresflng 193081 6X0 
KnfltKr. and Warners (197B61 7.00 UK Top 
40 (501431 BXO Unsolved Mystenas (36563) 
9X0 Cops I (131341 9X0 Cops D (69281) 
10X0 Siurdav Nktfn Ue 159414} 11X0 H* 
Slice! BUjrs 160679) 12X0 Skyrcxt 

SKY NEWS 

T.iertv-I«ti hour news sauce 

SKY MOVIES* 

6.00am Showcase iffE’Ol 

8.00 Vanishing Wilderness Aroonojn 
Adana documunun- <465011 


10X0 Slant Movie (1975) Comedy wtfi 
Mel Brooks as a Urn producer (94563) 

1 2X0 In the Une o( Duty: Siege at Merton 
(1992). Mormons dash wrh rhe pokes when 
(her leader is k®ed (36124) 

2X0pm Butch CassMy and the Sundmcn 
Kid (I960): Ho hen Ftedfbrd and Pad 
Newman as western outlaws (40760) 

4X0 Batman (196?): Stamng Adam Wesl 
vrtn Bun Ward as Ftafcm (7940) 

6X0 Utter Johnson (1991). Drama about 
an educated Uacfc man in Afnca (33686389) 
7X0 Entertainment Tonight (363124) 

8X0 CMck Change (1990): Bll Mirray ads 
ihe down to rob a bank (33747) 

10X0 The Adventures of Ford Fauna 
(1990) Andrew Dee Clay invesigates the 
deaih of a heavy meiaJ wiger (948414) 
11X0 Eleven Days, Eleven Nights Pari 2 
119881 A young woman researches a book 
on prostitution (442723) 
IXSamFianhenho oK er (1990): Sick h orror 
from director Frank Henenkrier (4875896) 
2X0 Savage HartMur (1989). Action fait 
about a mercfunl seaman (2309167) 


HALIBUT 

QUOTES 

HORACE 



All these words and more are in the puzzle 
above. That's Boggle, the fast fun game where 
you've got three minutes to find as many words 
as possible. Lerters must adjoin but not 
necessarily in a straight line 
Simple eh 7 Get Boggling. 


EVER BEEN BOGGLED? 



THE 3 MINUTE WORD GAME, 



4.10 Ganrood: Prisoner of War (1990): 
Ralph Macchlo m the true story oi a US Amiy 
soldier, accused al cotaborating with the 
enemy (573351). Ends ar 5X0 

SKY MOVIES GOLD 


4A5pm And Then them Were None 

(1945. Me): Agaiha ChrtstB whodirt 
sorrtnfl Baiy Fitzgerald (68236872) 

8X0 Dr Who aid the Delete (1965): Peter 
Cushng as the time-traveller (744951 
8X0 Summer of *42(1971) A teenager falfc 
rtous wth a widowed war bnda(7B149495) 
9X5 Alice Doesn't Uva Hare Anymore 
(1974). Ben Bustyn supports her aon 
(40175722) . Ends BI11X5 

THE MOVIE CHANNEL 

7.00am Tan LRtta Indians (1975)- Agatha 
Chnstie nutiar mystery (86853) 

9X0 Manuata (1957): Trevor Howard be a 
captain who lals tor a stowaway (493Q211) 

10.15 Brer Rabbit Christmas Carol 
Seasonal arwnanon (7186747) 

11X5 The Brigand of Kandahar (1985) - A 
Baigal Lancet learns up wuh a band* 
Stdmng Ofiver Reed (38009414) 
iXOpm The Mart of Zorn (1340, bftt): 
Swash bucking late starring Tyrone Power aa 
a masked adventurer (90516018) 

245 It Nearly Wasn't Christmas (1990) 
Sanla comes out of rewwnere (48388476) 
440 Robin Hood (19911- Patrick Berpri 
stars as the oullaw (83709969) 
OXOXJmsure Rrt news (4369) 

7X0 Homy, I Shrunk the Kids (1989)- Rick 
M orans nwiiarartses his own and nea doer's 
chidren (57105) 

9X0 Unde Buck (1969)- John Candy looks 
after hs brother's efttidren (233601 
11X0 Parts Trout (T990) in a a ol rage, 
Dems Hopper shoots a woman and her 
daughter (439476) 

1 245am bi the Best Interests of Bw CtiRd 

11990). Drama stamng Meg Tfly as a young 
mother protecting her daughter from her 
former husband [6965061 
2X5 Buried Alive (1990). Ten Maihsson IS 
poisoned by hts wife (784564 19) 

5X0 Rytng Tigers (1942, tVw) Romance 
set m second world war Own Slanro John 
Wayne (39169964). Ends al SX5 

SKY SPORTS 


GXOam Flatting ihe Wes! (63292) 7X0 The 
B*g League (581969) 9X0 GJetle Sports 
142211) 10X0 The Bool Room (182301 
11X0 Soccer Vlfeefcend (53106) 12X0 WWF 
Wresting Challenge (328341 IXOpm Sports 
Saturday (10027851 6X0 Rngstie Theatre 
(38018) 7.00 FA Cup Football (51 7835) 9X0 
WWF F’nmenme Wrestling (138171 11X0 
European League Rand-Up (26299) 12X0 
Rogside 117964) 2X0em Supertax (18490) 
3X0-4 XO Suting Pro Tour (85457) 


EUROSPORT 


S.tXMn Step Aerobics (1949S) 8X0 Font Ski 
Report (29230) 9X0 Tennis Davis Cup Final 
(59922501) 11.15 Ski Junptng Wortd Cup 
(234058) l.15pro Tarts (48784872) 3X0 
Figure Skating (24105) 5X0 Eiwhcotbs 
M agazra (5567834) 5X5 Ski Junpng 
Wortd Cup (5147747) 6X0 Bating (BS21 1) 
7X0 Tennis Davis Cup Frol (3495) 8X0- 
12X0 Tamta: Doubles Final (S61B766) 

SCREENSPORT 


GXOam Skang (4563405) 7.00 Sx-Dsy 
Cyung (4223785) 7X0 CSI Vienna: The 
Derby (616G96S) 8X0 Go — Motosport 
(8242389) 9X0 Sairg I44S3S698) 11X0 
NFL — Week in Review (65501) 12X0 NBA 
Action (25056) 12.30pm NBA Basketball 
(90940) 2X0 Flip Super Prix Termls (7505 61 
4X0 HRA Drag Racing (4049105) 4X5 
Sking (28778969) 6X0 Poworeputa 
(264650) 7X0 SMng (277330) 9X0 Gall 
(93872) 11X0 Motosport (17501) 12X0 
Dunlop Rroarax Masters (15506) 2X0ara 
PBA Bawling (16032) 3X0 Ladies Pro 
Bowfang (B3099J 4X0 Go — Motosport 
(18273) 5XOXXO Thai Kick Bra (12631) 

LIFESTYLE 


12X0 Rambo (10124) 1230pm Spiral Zcne 
(46037) 1X0 White Shadow (7060660) 1X5 
Ride on Stranger (156S785) 2X0 Spain 
Spain HoWay (7547940) 3.05 The Adven- 
tures of Jim Bowie (6107560) 3X0 Make 
Room kx Daddy (2389) 4.00 American 
Gamashows 137940) 9X0 Wok wim Yan 
(4380) 6X0 Sel-a-Vistoi [6829672) 10X0 
JlAebox Muse Videos (8099124) 2X0- 
3X0am Top Five (44254) 

UK GOLD 


6.00am Rainbow (100389211 6.15 Jama 
and Hie Magic Torch (10033476) 6X0 
Dangemouse (2780056) 7X0 Lassie 
(2149037) 7X0 Owl TV (2151672) 8X0 
Chock/s Challenge (2074679) 8X0 

flentaghMt (3066650) 9X0 Vaonanee 
(2000230) 9X0 Rude Dog and the Dweebs 
(8498227) 10.00 Jem (27713081 10X0 
Dungeons end Dragons (2088414) 11X0 
Flm Annie OaHey (1935. b/w) (3390501) 
12X0pm FSm- A Holiday Altar (1949, IVw) 
with Robert Mrtcfvjm and Janet Leigh 
(97UQ21 II 2X0 Bless Ths House (3338501) 
3X0 EastEndere (1 1 700371 5X0 The Chrora- 
des of Narna 13314389) 6X0 Bogerae 
(7943312) 7X0 Bleeo Hite House (3991261) 
7X0 Til Oeath Do Us Pen (3324786) 8X0 i 
Mtes Marpte. Al Bertram's Hotel (9603060) 
10X0 Shadows o I Ihe Heart (9520786) i 
12X0 The Yotmg Ones (3524341) 12X0am 
Three ol a Kind (6594902} IXOAXOmn in 
Concert. waw«wa (2495506) 


RADIO 1 


FH Stereo aid MW. 4XOam Neale Jsnee (FM 
only until GXOam] 7.00 Gay Davies 10X0 
Dave Lee Travis IXOpm Adrian Juste 2X0 
Otis Reacting- A Tribute ro a King 3X0 Johnnie walker BXO The Saturday Rock Stew 8X0 
Songfines Comedy and muse 9X0 Andy Kershaw 11X0 John Peel iFN only rter 12X01 
2JKV4X0am Lynn Parsons (HI mfyl 


RADIO 2 


RADIO 5 


FM Stereo 4X0am Bit RenneOs 6X0 BaTOara 
Sturgeon BX5 Bnan Matflianr Sounds of ihe 
Scrttes 10X0 Anne Robmson 12X0 reck 
Barradough's New Conroy IXOpm Comedy Hour. I’m Sony (1 Head Thai Amn (r), aid a 
1X0 Pull the Cither One (r) 2X0 Rome Hfton: Sounds ol me FHttes 3X0 Steve Race 4X0 
Lionel Bart Reviewing the Svuaron (r) 5X0 Gnema 2 5X0 The Grea Musicals 7 he 
BtVteru trt 6X0 Bab Hoiness Requests me Pteasue 7.00 Behind the H4s (2/6) 7X0 
Massed Bands Extravaganza 9X0 Easy Does K 10X0 Radro 2 Arts Rrogranme l2X5am 
Rowe Hflon (r) 1.00-4X0 John Terrefl wih Nlghr Ride 

News and sport on the hour intit Midday. 
6X0»J1 World Service oxo Weekend Edam 
9X0 Get Sei 10X0 Tates or the Texas 
Rangers 11X0 Go’ 12X05pcrton4Ptus 1 [a-5 Haoc 4 a; 9.i6arn) 12XOprnSpartscafl 1X0 

Spm m Fne. with Jofm tovvdate. Forebaa Ptoner League — Shaffidd Wednmdey v Aston 

Via. Leads v Nottingham Fores. Rugby Urion London v the Mfiaxis, North v ttw Strth 
West. Rugby Learie- Ragal Trophy: Racing from Sandown Park. 2X0 Wtiiam Mil Hendcap- 
2X0 Tingle Creek Chase 5X0 Sports Repot 5X5 Sa-O-Sh 7X0 La Top 9X0 Afrooon 
Worldwide 10.15 On the LenreL nd 11X0 Spoil 12X0-l2.lOani News. Soon 

Al times .n GMT. 4X0«m World Busitess 


WORLD SERVICE 


Report 4A0 Trawl and Wfitflwr 445 Pro- 
ffammec in German 5X0 Europe Today 6X0 

News 8.15 The Wortd Today 6X0 Programmes in French 6X8 Weafwr 7X0 Newade* 7X0 

People and Poitta 8X0 News 8X9 Wdrds o* F&th 8.15 A Jo»y Good Show 9X0 News 9X5 
World BuSrfldsS Report 9.15 Woiktincr 9X0 Personal View 945 Sports Roun&jalOXa News 
10X1 Jazz Now and Then 10.1 5 Latter tan America 10X0 Waveguda 1040 Book Chocs 
1045 From the WeeWias 11X0 Newsdeak 11x9 Trawl 11X0 BBC En^sh 1145 
Mtogsmagajn Midday News 12X9pm Woitfs of Path 12.16 kUnrack 3 1246 Sports 
Roundup 1X0 News 2X0 Ctob EMS 2.15 Personal view 2X0 Sport swortd 3X0 Naws 3.15 
Sportsvrarld 4X0 News 4X9 News About Britain 4.15 BBC English 4X0 Progtonmas n 
German 5X0 Naws sxo Programmes t\ Franch 6X0 News 6X0 Prnaanmes m Garmm 
0X0 Naas 8X9 Personal View B2S Words of Fash BXO Europe fife Weekend 8X6 

European Sports News 9x0 News 1 0.15 Mendan 1045 Sports RcrtTdiD 11x0 News 11. 05 
Wtards erf Fatih 11.10 Book ChOtofi 11.15 A Jofly Good Show Iffldnlght News 12X0am The 
Ken Bruce Show 1X0 News 1.01 Play of the Week: The winter VW* 200 News 2X0 The 
Greatest Power on Earth 3X0 News 3X9 News About Brkain 215 Sports Romdup3X0 From 
On- Own Conespondent 3x0 wrae On 4X0 News 4.1? Far Betrer tor worse 

SXOan Sarah Luca* BXO CSasac CD Ctel 


CLASSIC FM 


ftmiwn with Paj Gambacar* 12X0 Petroc 
Traiawiy 3X0pm Adnan Lwa 8X0 Classic 
America writ) Mel Q>0per7X0 L'Eksir tfAmore. Donuan.-s opera. Inre Iran Ihe Metropolitan 
Opera Hdwm h New York 10X0 Oassto Oa2 1ZX04tgO«B Andre lam 


VARIATIONS 


ANGLIA 

As London uoapb 5X0-5.15 Anglia News 
(4032960) 12X0-1 XO Jake and tire Fa Man 
(23148) 

BORDER 

As London swept: 1.10440 Granada 
Sport (24288259) 5X04.15 Border News 
(£894747) 12X0 Fitor Woman m Chants 
(6946761) 1X0 far McCuflOch (7718322) 
2X0 The HH Man and Her (23709) 4X0 
Videofashion (79815) 4X0-5 XO The Big E 

CENTRAL 

As London except 5.00 Cental News 
(5631637) 5X5-5.15 The Central Mach 
Goals Extra (289301 8) 12X0 Ftim: Twice n a 
DfeCme 137341) 2X0 The Law and Harry 
McGraw (8CW38) 3X0 CromAnracWjns 
(58322) 4X0 Amenca's Top Ten (790155 
4X0 Elvs Good Roctim Tonight (3681 44381 
4.55-5X0 JobOnder 92 (2288322) 

GRANADA 

As London except 1.10-440 Grenade 
Sport- Kick Ofl (24206259) 5X0-5. 15 Grana- 
da News (5631637) Mtovred by Granada 
Spore Gaols Extra (2893018) 12X0 Rim 
Women )n Chains (6946761) 1x0 (an 
McCutach (7719322) 2X0 The W Man wto 
Her (23709) 4X0 Video (ashion (79615) 4X0- 
5X0 The Big E (17506) 


HTV WEST 

As London mtmpb 5X0-5.15 HTV West 
News and Sport (4032969) 

HTV WALES 

As HTV West eircspCSXOilS HTV Wales 
News and Sport 

TSW 

As London except: 1X0 The SoUh West 
week (37895834) 2.1 04.40 Snooloer 
[97816476) 5X0 TSW News (5831637) 5X5- 

5.15 Gus HoneyburTa Cartoon Time 
(2893018) 12X0 Rim: Women in Chains 
(6946761) 1X0 Ian McCuloch (7728070) 
2X0 The H« Man and Her (037815) 4X0 
Videatashion (79815) 4X0-5X0 The Big E 

TVS 

As London except 1 .10-140 TVS Sporting 
Decade (93511414) 5X0-5.15 TVS News 
(4032969) 12X0-1X0 The Young Rktan 
123148) 

TYNE TEES 

As London except 5X0-5.15 Tyne Tees 
Saturday (4032969) 12X0 Rbn: Nasty Hero 
(89065) 2X0 The Hi Man end Her (23709) 
4X0 Gel Wert (79815) 4X05X0 Cue me 
Muse (4499815) 

ULSTER 

As London ma p t 11X0-12X0 Zeno 
(8495) 140 Movies, M rales. Movies 


(37895834) 2.10 Snooker (19419682) 
4X5-440 Goal of Ihe Wedc (5299926) 5.05- 

5.16 Satuday Sport (2893018) 12X0 Rkn: 
Women in Chains (8946761) 1X0 tan 
McCuloch (7719322) 2X0 The Ht Man and 
Ha (23709) 4X0 Weot a s h lon [78815)4X0- 
5X0 The Big E (17500) 

YORKSHIRE 

As London except 11X0-12X0 The 
Mounter Bare Show (8495) 1X5-1.10 
Calendar News (11757969) 5X05.15 Cal- 
endar News (4032969) 12X0 F9m- Nasty 
Hero (5671419) 2X0 Tha Ht Man and Her 
(23709) 4X0 Gel Wet (79815) 4X05X0 
Cue the Music (449981 5) 

S4C 

Starts: GXOam Heathcbff (1224018) 6X5 
Eireeka’e Castle (5135327) 6X5 Kideo 
(1 1 1 3563) 7X5 High 5 (2845292) 7X5 Trans 
wortd Sport (4130898) 9X0 News (492B78SJ 

9.15 Racing The Morning Une (5487785) 
10X0 Jeifin (61650) 10X0 Gazzstla Football 
Bale — Witrt Petd Gascogne (690 IB) 11X0 
Amatean Footbal: Play Action (0037) 12X0 
Hqrpy Days (4Q230) 1 2X0 The Cosby Shranr 
(76143) 1.00 The Friend (1967281) 2.15 
Channel 4 Raong (5350178) 3X0 Fftm. 
Siege of the Samns (279124) 6X5 
Brooks**? (3038105) BXO M{«ic Romd- 
afaout (678308) 6X8 Now You're Tetdng 
(511380) 7X0 News ana Sport (113056) 

7.15 Bacba Hi O'Ma (878B73) 8X0 Deryn 
(237124) 8X5 Tocyn Tymor (975650) 94S 


Ladyboys (318037) 1045 Flm. The Return 
of Martin Guerre (Gerard Depodtau, 
Naihate Baye) (782389) 1245 The Happen- 
nfl (948 1 48) 1 48 The Word (8924071^ 2X0 
Ftim: Ran Nme From Otiar Space (Gregory 
Walcott, Tom Keene, Mona McKinnon) 
(6562341) 4X5 Ctose 

RTE 1 

Starts: 12.15pm The Mariner (3880673) 

1.15 The Campbells (99509143) 140 Soum 
Ridng (5410688) 2X5 News (1 975679) 240 
Ltifle House on (ha Pralne (3293872) 230 
Ftim. A Day ar ihe Races (4643037) 6X0 
Eureka (9522501) 6X0 The AngehM 
(8857969) 9.01 News (1749476) 6.15 
Maibag (1216495) 640 Play Ihe Gams 
(8397232) 7.10 Concert lor Somafa 
(75188281) 9X0 News (985658Z) BXO 
Concert lor Somata (89536582) 12X0nm 
News (4381051) 12X5 A Prayer at Bedtime y 
(4380322) 1240 Ctose # 

NETWORK 2 

Starts: BXOam Children's ProyammeB 
12X0pm Flm Cup Fewa (89771747) 1X6 
News (30302495) 140 Sports Stadium 
(58944788) 5.15 Beyond 2000 (20088850) 

6X0 Famtiy Tes C66B35476) 6X0 Seachteh 
(48863650) 6X5 News (93358940) 7 J* 

Rhrer ol light (41449634) 8X0 News 
(98574969) 8X3 Lotto Draw (B6574889) 

8X5 Roots- The Next Genwadon (68068478) 
10X8 Rim. War and Peace (28888211) 
12X0 Close 


RADIO 3 


&35am Open University: Access 
to Maths — Count down to 
Equations 6Jj5 Weather 

7.00 Record Review, introduced 
by Paul Guinery. Weber 
[Overture. Peter Schmoti: 
Phiffiaimorva under Neeme 
Jdrvij: Stanford (CeBo Sonata 
No 2 in D minor, Op 39: Julian 
Uoyd Webber John McCabe, 
piano}: Georg Mathias Monn 
(Two Cantatas; Rtoeroar 
Consort). Haydn Wood (Suite, 
London Cameos Czecho- 
slovak RSQ. Bratislava, under 
Adrian Leaped: Andrti Caplet 
(Septal (or throe female voices 
and string quartet): Mozart 
(Symphony No 36 in C. K425, 
Linz: Amsterdam Baroque 
Orchestra under Ton 
l-eopman) 9X0 Naws 

9.05 Record Review (cant): 
Richard Osborne presents 
Building a Library. Verdi's 
Simon Boccanegra: new 
releases ol late Romantic 
orchestral music. 10X5 
Record Release: Prokofiev 
(Symphony-Concerto. Op 125: 
Pittsburgh SO Lander Lonn 
Maazel. with Yo-Yo Ma. cello): 
Sibebus (Scene wtth Cranes. 
Op 44 No 2: Danish National 
A SO under Leif Segersiam). 
11X5 Jeremy Stepmartn 
presents piano reissues. 
12X5pm Rachmaninov (F>iana 
Concerto No 2 in C minor, the 
composer, piano; Philadelphia 
Orchestra under Leopold 
Siokowski) 

1.00 News 

1-05 Vermeer Quartet — ShmueJ 

Ashkenasr and Rene Menard, 
worms, Richard Young, viola, 
aid Marc Johnson, celto — 
performs Beethoven (Quartet 
in D, Op 18 No 3): Peter 
Schickels (American Dreams). 
2X0 Peter Sctuckete's 
biography of P.D 0. Bach. 
Read by Peter Barter 2X5 
Dvofak (Quartet m F, Op 96. 
American) (r) 

135 Lamentations of Jeremiah: 
Taverner Consort under 
Andrew Parrott sings two sets 


Rutiarmonic): Schubert 
1; In der Feme. 

2 : with Max 

lie __ 

(Vioin sonata in G. Op 78: 
with Georg Kuienkampf, 
viofn); Barak (Dance Suite: 
London Philharmonic]: Mozart 
(Bn Mfldchen Oder Waibchen, 
Die Zaitoerflflte: Vienna 
Philharmonic, with Hermann 
Prey, tenor); Kodfily (Suita. 

' ' Janos: London 


of lamentations bytaffis 
3X0 Solti. The Early Years. Natalie 
Wheen presents a seven-part 
series on Ihe career of the 
conductor and pomst Sr 
Georg Sofli. In the first 
progra m me, Solti remembers 
his chikfinoc In Hungary, and 
his stuefies with Koday and 
BartcSk. Koddly [Dances of 
Galanta: London 


5X0 ■te” 

presented by Geoffrey Smith 
545 Opera News, with James 
Naughtier 
6.30 Uva tram ttie Met — L'Eftslr 
rTAmore 

• CHOICE: Donizetti's 
detighttul opera raises the 
curtain on yet another season 
of these >ve transmissions 
from New York's famous 
house that are among the 
points of Redo 3‘s operatic 
oiflpuL The coming weeks wifi 
tiring new productions of The 
Ravi. Lucia de Lammgrmoor. 
Die Meistgrsinger and Anadne 
auf Naxos. Tonight's cast 
Includes Kathleen Battle as 
Adna, Francisco Araiza as 
Nemorino. Mark Oswald as 
Betaore and Enzo Daiaas 
Dulcamara The conductor Is 
Edoaido Muiler. Act 2 (at 8.10) 
begins afteths architectural 
historian Brendan Gtfl'a interval 
talc on exploring New York 
B.15 The Translators- In the last of 
six programmes. Adam 
Czemiawski discusses POfish 
poetry wtthDanaJd Davie 
9J3B Joanna MacGregor: The 
i Bach (French 
linG.BWVaiBl: 
Hugh Wood (Three Pieces. Op 
5): Ravel (Vaises nobles et 
senbmeniales): Chopin 
(Ballade No 4 In F minor, Op 
52) M 

1030 Glasgow Jazz Festival: The 
writer Alan Plater introduces 
the first at two recorded 
concerts featuring the Carta 
Bley Big Band. The snotatst 
Alexander Balanescu joins the 
band to play Bley's specially 
commissioned piece, Birds of 
ParacBse. With Lew ScdoH. 
trumpet Gary Valenle, 
trombone. Andy Sheppard, 
saxophone, Steve Swallow, 
bass, and Adam Nussbaum. 
druns. During the interval, 
Plater talks to Bley 
12J0-12L35amNew8 


RADIO 4 


(s) Stereo on FM 
5J55am Shipping Forecast 6X0 
News Brieftig. aid 6X3 
weather 6.10 The Farming 
Week: Oliver Walston 
concludes his travels around 
Bolivia 6X0 Prayer far the Day 
6X5 weather 7X0 Today, ind 
7.00. 7X0, &00, 8X0 News 
7X0 Listeners' Letters 7X5, 
8.25 Sports News 745 
Thought for me Day 7X5 
Weather 840 Yesterday in 
Parliament 8X8 Weather 
9X0 Nows 9X5 Sport on 4 

r. Bill Q 


9X01 


.. Oddie with 
travel and holiday news 

10X0 News; Loose Ends, with Ned 
Sherrin, John Walters, Emma 
Fraud and Arthur Smith (s) 

11X0 News; Tha Week in 
Westminster, with Peter 
Riddell. poMical editor of The 
Times 

11X0 EurophUe. with Brian 
Hanrghan 

12X0 Money Box. with Alison 
Mitchell 

12X5pni I'm Sony I Haven't a 
Clue: Humphrey Lyttetton 
chairs the antidote to panel 
_ flames (s) 12X5 Weather 

1.00 News 

1.10 Any Questions? Jonathan 
Dimbieby chairs a cfiscusston 
vi Kirkby Lonsdale, Cuntoria, 
between David Maquand, 
professor ol politics at 
Sheffield Urxveraiy: ShaJa 
McKechnie, director of Shelter: 
Donald Dewar, MP. shadow 
social security secretory, and 
Michael Spicer, MP (r) 1X5 
flipping Forecast 

2X0 News; Any Answers? 071- 
580 4444. Lines open from 
12.3Cipm 

2X0 Satunlay Playhouse: 

Rector's Daughter 
• CHOICE: Every twist and 
tom of the ptat of Simon 
Gray s dramatisation ot 
F M Mayor's nova) about 
undeclared love betrays the 
lad that this is not a piece 
created specially for radio, 
ma said, probably nobody 
could have adapted Ihe book 
more respectfully than Gray or 
efireded the play more 
s^rsitiyely than Jane Morgan. 
Jutie Covington plays tha 


aporwmous heroine, whose 
only faun, according to the 
fluffy-brained woman (Sophie 
Thompson) who marries the . 

parson (Janies Lautenson) # 

whom the rector's daughter 
secretly worships, is that she 
does not have afauft (s) 

4X0 News; Age fro Age. 

Christopher Cook recsJls 
George IVs visit to EcSnburah 
in 1822, and discusses the Ad 
of Union between England and 
Scotland 

4X0 Science Now: Peter Evans 
reports from a conference held 
last week to mark the fiftieth 
anniversary of the 
development of nuclear power 

5.00 Coating the Earth: James 
Lovelock, the forme* space 
scientist, inventor ot the 
rrecrowave and creator of the 
Gaia theory, discusses the 
environment 

JL25 Tea Junction, with Patrick 
Hannan 5X0 Shipping 
Forecast 5X5 WBather 
6X0 News and Sporte Round-Up 
6X5 Week Ending (s) W | 

6J50 The Locker Room: Tony 
Sewell from Tha Voice 


male identity (3) 

7X0 Kaleidoscope: Helena of 
Owyd. Paul Atten meete 
Helena Kaot Howson, Ihenew 
artistic tSrector of ThsafrCM 
7X0 Chwslc Serial: The Wrong 
Box. The first rf iwo stories by 
Robert Louis Stevenson- (s) 

&S0 Conversation piece: Sue 
MacGregor meeteYrt 

Newbokt, company secretary 

SL20 Murieh’lEmfySn Kay wfih 
favourite mebdos 
9X0 Ten to Tan (g) 9^ Weather 

10.00 News 

10.15 Open KUnd, presented by 
Sarah Baxter and Henry Porter 
1045 Worlds Apart Anste 
Jamgotchian tatics to Ray. 

Brown about her chtidhood 

memoftes of Greece 
11X0 Rtchord Bakar Compare® 
Notes on music tor TO fl 0 ™ 8 




11X01 

12.00-12.43am Un, »«> • — M 
Weather 12X3 ShtaoSno 
World Service (Li 


i0S3kHzffi8Sm:i089kHz(275m: f 
F ^L‘®®' 9 9- 2 3: FM -90.2-924. Radio 4: 198kHz/l51»ri. ^ 

^ H ®0*cHz/330m. LBC: 

FM ' 95 8 SLR: 1458kHz/2Q6m; FM 949: Wh* 

Service: MW 64fikHz/463m Classic FM:FM-100-102. 










SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1992 


SUNDAY TELEVISION AND RADIO 




7-30 SiSSfSSS* Terrtto *y 11946. b/w) Routine Western starring 
as a shenh on the trail of Frank and Jesse James 
n « 2232 Tl ™ Whelan (93403186) 

n™SJr 0min ® A<hrBn * Calendar Anne Diamond ana Nick Owen 
r=«Sl c ?« mus,ca5 appreciation ot the Salvation Army’s wort-. 
q i* S^ 3 ^l 1 A News ^ weather (5684544) 

*».ia monung Worship. In the second of four special Advent services, 
ram Rhodes lomds the Community ot Sisters at the Pnory ol Our 
1Bnft Good Counsel m Sussex (si (54324191 
<0.00 see Heart Ruth Craig and Sarah Livermore, who are both deaf. 
crossed the Atlantic Ocean in a 72ft ketch. With signing and 
aA>h«es (rnsU7 7 89254) 

<0-45 Italian fsslmo The sixth in a ten-part Italian tenguaoa and culture 
... (9025308). Wales: Careering Ahead 

< ■ -00 Careering Ahead. Helping servicemen returning to civilian lire 
0-*38» Wales: 1 1 15-1230 See You Sunday 
i 1-30 Mosaic. The l3St m a three-part series dealing with racial 
harassment (2167) 

12.00 Advice Shop. Welfare rights magaane (r) (33780) 

12^0 Country File with John Craven (2632083) Wales. Down to Earth 
1255 Weather (65986438) 

150 News (11723902) 1.05 On the Record (8452696) 

250 EastEnders. Onrobus edition (r). (Ceefax) (s) (21047) 
aooSdorado (rj. (Ceefax) (s) (4544) 

350 Smash Hits PoHwfnrters’ Party. Simon Mayo presents the pip 
awards show five from Olympia (s) (29273) 

550 Cartoons. Bugs Bunny triple bill (4098525) 

550 The Clothes Show. Anna Roddick welcomes the first tour group to 
visa her Body Shop factory m Lrttlehampton. Susse* fs) (8518761) 

5.45 The Borrowers. The penultimate episode of the six-pan drama 
following the adventures of the uny family who live under the 
fkxxboards, (Ceefax) (s) (788964) 

6.15 Weather Watch with Craig Charles (Ceefax i (281 780) 

655 News and weather (292761 t 

6M Songs of Praise. Alan Trtch marsh visits the German village of 
Burgstemhjrt. (Ceefax) (s) (452849) 

7.15 Last of the Summer Wine. Another amiable meander round the 
Yorkshire Dales (Ceefax) (s) (709457) 

7.45 Perry Mason: The Case of the Desperate Deception An 
American marine based in Paris is framed tor the murder of a 
wartime concentration camp commandant. (Ceefax) (154438) 

9.15 News with Michael Buerk. (Ceefax) Weather (931612) 

950 Look at tt this Way. The final episode ol the quirky satirical drama 
about London life in the Eighties (Ceefax) (42419) 








Reflections on evensong: Dame Betty Ridley (10.30pm) 
1050 Everyman 

• CHOICE: Evensong has been part of Dame Betty Ridley's life 
since she was a child and she is now 83. She was was bom and 
bred in the Church of England, the daughter of a bishop and the 
wife of a chaplain. In a touching and evocative film Dame Betty 
offers her reflections on a service which she sees as summing up 
life and preparing for death. The theme of death features strongly 
Dame Betty was widowed early, lost a brother ai EJ Alamein and 
recently came dose to death herself. It has not stopped her driving 
cars faster than her loved ones think wise Her thoughts and 
memories are interwoven with an evensong from Winchester 
Cathedral, which demonstrates the strength of English choral 
singing and celebrates composers who have written specially tor 
the service notably the Victorians Stanford and HoweUs (Ceefax) 
(s) (104419). Northern Ireland- Disciples of Dissent 

11.10 Survivor’s Guide to Maastricht. A layman's guide to the 
Maastricht Treaty (995983). Northern Ireland. 1 1.20 Everyman 

11 .45 Bellamy Rides Again. David Bellamy visits a Surrey hospital and a 
Dutch pig farm ir). (Ceefax) (1963326). Northern Ireland: 12.00 
Survivor’s Guide to Maastricht 

12.15am The Sky at Night Patrick Moore is |oined by former Astronomer 
Royal Professor Sir Francis Graham-Smith (s) (2813342) 

1255 Tanhaiyan (r) (7410755) Northern Ireland: Bellamy Rides Again 
1.05-1.45 Tanhafvan 1.15 Weather (3769823) 


7.00 Felix the Cat Animation (8988815) 7.15 Playdaye pj is) 
(2607032) 7 AO Smoggies (r) 19909506) 855 Telling Tates. 
(Ceefax) 15499235) 850 OrvfBe and Cuddles (i) (2881051) 655 
Bttsa (r) (s) (5493051) 8.45 Gentle Ben. Children's drama (r) 
(Ceefax) (1418709) 9.10 The Wetter the Better. Game show (s) 
(609876D 9-3S Thunder-cats (r) (1244457) 10.00 Kevin and Co. 
(Ceefax) <s) (9576002) 1055 Blue Pater Omnibus (r> (s) 
(1400273) 11.15 The O-Zone. Music news (2584506) 

1150 Shakespeare — The Animated Tales: Romeo and Juliet (r) (s) 
(82691 

12.00 Thunderbirds. Gerry Anderson's classic puppet senes Plans to 
move the Empire State Building go wrong. (Ceefax) (r) (8882235) 

1250 The Invaders. Vintage science-fiction series (r) (1592780) 

1.40 The Staggering Stories of Ferdinand de Barges Surreal 
comedy tr) (s) (21309490) 

2.00 Regional Parliamentary Programmes i3051 j Nortnem Ireiano. A 
Room With a View; Wales: Scrutiny 

250 Trivial Pursuit David Attenborough asks why animals spend so 
much time at play. (Ceefax) (970) 

3.00 Rftn.- Mister Roberts (1955) Rambling and enjoyable version of a 
hit stage comedy about an American cargo ship in the second 
world war. Starring James Cagney, Henry Fonda William Powell and 
Jack Lemmon Directed by John Ford and Mervyn Le Roy (23457) 

5.00 Rugby Special. Chrts Rea Introduces highlights ot London v 
Midlands and North v South/South West (s) (3438) Wales. Cardiff v 
Swansea, Uanelii v Nealh 

6.00 Sid Sunday. David Vine introduces the new season of the Wono 
Cup downhill championship, which begins with the men's downhill 
from Val d'lsere (637709) 

655 The Money Programme. On the eve of Arret rad's critical general 
meeting. Alan Sugar answers his critics on the plans for a buy-back 
that will take Amstrad private (798544) 

7.15 The Realms of the Russian Bear. Nikolai Orazouv encounters me 
wildlife of Wrangel island, north of the Arctic aide. (Ceelax) 
(297490) 

8.05 Funny Business: Let There be Love. An examination or the an ol 
the comedy double -act features interviews with Cannon and Ball, 
Peter Cook end Dudley Moore. Ernie Wise. Dean Martin and Jerry 
Lewis (S) (574612) 

8.55 Did You See. . ? Jeremy Paxman and his guests, writer Hunter 
Davies. Mavis Nicholson and England rugby union full-back 
Jonathan Webb, discuss Casualty, Cntrcat Eye. Do Families Need 
Fathers?, and First Tuesday Brezhnev S Daughter (sj (168070) 

955 Prisoners of Conscience. Helena Kennedy, QC, launches a two- 
week series of nightly appeals (789186) 

9.55 The Cry. The Cry of Zeptautiafi. British cmnposer Michael 
Finrussy, the BBC Singers and the Nash Ensemble with the second 
m the senes of music videos for Advent (s) (567186) 

10.15 Rim: Longtime Companion (1990). A group of gay friends 
dismiss the threat of Aids, but one by one their lives are devastated 
by the illness A moving and sympathetic drama tor International 
Aids Day, directed by Norman Rene. (Ceefax) (723544). Wales: The 
Soul of a Natan 10.55 Film. Longtime Companion 



Gangster and moll: Lee Marvin, Gloria Grahame (11.55pm) 

1 1 55 Film: The Big Heat {1953. tt/w) 

• CHOICE. In lists ol the world's oust turns which have been doing 
the rounds recently. 77 a? Big Heat has figured curiously (idle Yet it is 
certainly amui >g the finest gangster movies, with a bite, energy and 
economy ot style that makes today's contributions ic the genre 
seem lumbering and overstretched. Glenn Ford play a a ugue cop 
who resigns from the force so that he can avenge himaefl jr. the 
gangsters who killed his wife Lee Marvin has one of h is early 
hoodlum roles and Glona Grahame is the moll who tries to go 
straight and. in a scene shocking for ns time, has her face scarred 
with boiling coffee. Directed with dark intensity by the German 
emigre Fritz Lang, and exploring the lavounte Langian themes of 
fate, murder and revenge. The Big Heal grips from its terrific 
opening sequence and never lets up (274032) Wales 1230-1 55 
Film The Big Heat Enas at 155 


I TV LONDON 


6.00 TV-am (5828815) 

955 The Disney Club. Richard Orford. Paul Hendy and Andrea 
Boardman are joined by Oannii Mtnyogue (s) (2106506) 

10.45 Link. Rachel Hurst talks abuut the effect of (he United Nations 
Decade of Action of Disabled People. (Oracle) (7425524) 

11.00 Morning Worship from Our Lady of the Sea. Lowestoft (26438) 
12-00 The Human Factor. Ten years ago Sven-Er* Ljungholm was an 
airline executive wtth 3 private plane. Then he sold everything he 
owned and became a Salvation Army officer. He now brings 
comfort to the poor of Moscow (Oracle) 125148) 

1250 LWT News Weekend (77099} 

1 .00 News with Dermot Mumaghan. Weather (40501032) 

1 .10 Special inquiry. A week before the EC summit in Edinburgh, Donald 
MacCormick questions leading politicians from Britain and Euope 
(2009525) 

250 BuBseye Darts and general knowledge game (7877) 

250 The London Match Jim Rosenthal introduces highlights of the 
match between Chariton and Portsmouth which marks Chariton's 
return to the Valley alter a gap of seven years (s) (89001) 

350 Snooker. Uve action from the quarter-final of the Coalite World 
Match play championship at the Dome In Doncaster (14341) 

550 Baywateh. The perfectly formed lifeguards of Los Angeles County 
parade the beaches for damsels m distress Craig and Cort are 
trapped m an underwater cave when an earthquake rocks the 
beach (r) (7344) 

6.00 Animal Country Sarah Kennedy arid Desmond Moms continue 
their tour of East Anglia (525) 

650 News with Dermot Mumaghan. Weather (888877) 655 LWT Neva 
(887148) 

6A0 Highway. &r Harry Seeombe. visits Bathgate in West Lothian. 
lOracfe) (852065) 

7.15 The Ruth RendeU Mysteries: Kissing the Gunner’s Daughter. 

Final episode ol this four-part murder story. When inspector 
Wexford (George Baker) comes to a startling conclusion it looks as 
though he could become the next vidfm. (Oracle) (585099) 


jSj' ' jte-, 




Playing It straight David Jason turns detective (8.15pm) 

8.15 A Touch of Frost 

• CHOICE. After years of Del Boy and other excursions into low-fife 
comedy. David Jason turns straight actor to play a detective 
inspector in a htghly-prorrusing new police series based on the 
books of B.D. Wingfield Jack Frost is an irascible and cyrucaj 
copper who likes to cut comets and avoid paperwork. He also 
works punishingfy long hours, partly to ease the distress of a wife 
dying of cancer In short, he is a rounded and credible character 
and Jason catches him beautifully. A Touch of Frost has all the 
makings of quality drama, which shews that it is possible to achieve 
realism without recourse to foul language and thuggish violence. 
Tonight s episode, strongly written by Richard Hams, offers' an 
ingeniously structured plot, in which the search for a missing 
schoolgirl leads to the discovery of a 30-year-cfd murder. (Oracle) 
(S) (215273) 

10.15 News with Dermot Mumaghan Weather (952490) 

1055 The New Statesman. Raucous, unsubne but often tunny political 
satire starring Rik Mayall as Alan B'Staid. the newfy elected MEP tor 
the German constituency of Obersaxony. (181877) 

1155 Snooker. Nick Owen introduces further coverage of the first semi- 
final of the Coalite World Matchplay championship from the 
Doncaster Dome (654032) 

1250am Cue the Music. American rock guitarist Randy Cafitorma in 
concert 31 the Glastonbury Rock Festival (4307397) 

1 .35 The nv Chart Show (r) (s) (8728804) 

2.40 FDm: Nairobi Affair (1984). Standard safari adventure starring 
Charlton Heston as a former big game hunter who teams up with his 
son to catch a gang of ivoiy poachers. Directed by Marvin 
J. Chomsky (945858) 

450 Pick of the Week with Mark Haytey (4181 1) 

5.00 Grand Prlxat Sea. Highlights of the 1992 Guernsey inemationa! 4- . 

litre powerboat race (50804) 

5.30 FTN Morning News (9 8991) Ends at 640 


CHANNEL 4 


6.00 Trans World Sport (r) (43780) 7J3Q Take Star younger viewers 
(2619877) 755 Laurel and HsKfy (rj (79048777 7.® Uttfe 
Wizards Cartoon (9997761) 8-00 Sandokan. Exptafis of a pirate 
prince (46631) 850 Wish KkL Cartoon (14083221 855 7Tnfln. 
Animated adventures of Herge s classic character (2875254) 955 
Laurel and Hardy (5672709) 950 Oennb (rj (8134877) 

955 Flipper. Adventures of the fnendy dolphin (538896) 

10.1 5 The Lone Ranger (bfw) Vintage series following the adventures of 
‘ the masked hero,' hfe Indian sdeWdCTorao aid SSwer his horse 
(520877) 

1055 Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. Tales ot an exttaorduiaiy 
submarine and her cafrtam (312070) 

1 1.45 um House on the Prairie. Tnals and mbuiaBans of a ctose-knit 
Kansas plains fam9y (318254) . 

t£A5 Classic Cars. Alexander Patrick reveals fas selection of classics for 
(he future in the last of the safes (r) (890148) 

1.15 Football Kalla. Frarentina v Juveritus (80003047} 

350 Fflin: The Secret Partner (1961 . Ww) . Satisfyingfy complex thnlier 
starring Stewart Granger as a shipping executi ve who b eoomes a 
target fix blackmail. Directed by Basil Dear den (826273) 

5.10 News and weather (723141 1) ■ 

6.15 High Interest: Swonte into Tube Trains. As pressures mount to 
cut defence spereSng. this programme nves&gates the impact on 
defence manufacturers and asks to wh at extent these companies 
can adapt to dviftan production (9732051) 

650 The Miraculous Meflop* Australian fantasy senes (167) 

650 The Cosby Show. American farrdy comedy (Tetetsxl) ( 419) 



Game boy. a child has tun wtth an etectronfc toy (750pm) 

750 Equinox: Toying wtth the Future 

• CHOICE The ostensible purpose of this seasonal film on 
chfldren's toys is to explore how they are being shaped by ehangtog 
technology. But for a supposed science strand there is not a tot of 
science, white despite the tide the fifm ranges as much over the pa3t 
as the future. The result is something ol a ragbag with no dear fine 
of argument.’ though offering plenty of diversion along the way 
There is a delightful look at the Meccano set aid Ss creator, Frank 
Hamby, who hoped that “Meccano boys" would be dean in 
thought and habit. There is, inevitably, much on video games, said 
whether they are helping to create a generation ot sedertary and 
violent children. - There are a ponderous contributions from 
American professors and a terse one from a tittle girl who complains 
that dolls are sexist (Teletext) (5761) ■ ■ 

650 Poeiry In Motion. Germane Greer introduces today's programme, 
on the theme of women in love. Among her choices are "How do ! 
love thee? Let me count the ways", by Elizabeth Barrett Browning 
(8983) 

850 American Footbafi Mick Lucfchuret and Gary Imtecfi introduce 
highlights of the match between the Green Bey Packer and the 
Detroit Lions (33186) 

1050 F3ro: The Longest Day (1982, bM John Wayne, Robert Mitchum 
and Henry Fonda are among an afl-star cast in this stirring 
recreation of the sited landings in Normstdy on June 8 1944. 
Directed by Andrew Marten, Ken Annakin, Bernhard WicW and Gerd 
Oswald (69991761) 

i .15am Filin: Eremfira (1982). Powerful drama about a young gW who 
is forced into prostitution by her grandmother (Irene. Papas) and 
plots her revenge. Directed by Roy Guerra. In Spanish with Engffish 
subtitles (685?97) Ends at 3.10 


VUeoPhiM- and lb* Video ttusCodts 

The lumbers next u> each IV programme fasting an? Video RusCode"* numbers, 
which atow you to prog ramm e your.vrieo recorder retanBv with 1 VldeoPft&v™ 
handset VdooRus*- can oe tsed with mast videos. Tap in the Video FhcCode for the 
programme wuwlsft to reavd. For more detafecaQ Indraffusrai 0839 72l204fcafc 
charged at 48p per minute peak. 36p off -peak) or write to VdeoPU&f . Accrue* Ltd. 
5 Ivory House. Plantation Wharf, Lender SW1 1 3TN. VdeopJus* ("*), Ptuscode I™) 
and Vndeo Programmer are trademarks of Gemstar Martcenng Ud 


VARIATIONS 


ANGLIA 

As London except 1240 Gardening Time 
(1068490 1 12.50-1.00 Anglia News 
1117/44901 200 Snootef (458S«I 5-00 
Wimttng 11467) 5JO«J>0 Bufeeya 1613 

BORDER 

As London except 12-30-1.00 Garterrng 
Time (433741 1 J 2.00 Snooker 1458544) 54)0 
Seal Sport (73M1 6.Q0-&30 Buteeye (525) 
1ZJ0 Quc 17263200) 12S5 

Mmorepon Special (9265674) 1J0 Film 
What 's Good For (He Gocze (619630) £2$ 
Pk* ol It* WOek 140260303! 3.50 ITV Chan 

Show (6395787) 4S&530 JoMmlar 

11646741) 

CENTRAL 

As London- except: 12-30-1-00 Gardening 
Time 14337411) 2.00 Snooler 153748031 
2.45 The Central Malch Uve <36763 1-fe) 
SjOO cartoon Time (40923411 5.15 Wlesang 
[9741709) 500430 BuUsaye (525) 12-30 
The EquOeac (4307397? 155 Tim 
Baby anfl Hie BantesTsp 13S43231 3.15 The 
17V Chart Show (7065281) 4.10 to 1 Im/ilaticin 
to Remember (Norman Wcttan) iK.95939) 
4.45-530 Central JobAnder '92 (96903971 

GRANADA 

As London oxeopt 12*5-1.00 Whai the 
MPs Say P910167) 2M Granada Action 


&55am Wealher 
7,00 Sunday Morning Concert 
BSC Concert Orchestra 
performs Novak (Overtixe. 
Marysa). Walton (Touch her 
Soft Ups and Part. Suite — 
Henry V}; Wtewberger (Under 
Hie Spreading Chestnut Tree); 
Coates (Suite. London Every 
Day); Adcfnsell (Warsaw 
Concerto): Arnold (Su|le. 
Sweeney Todd): Suk (A Fasy 
Tale Suite) 9-00 News 
9.05 Brian Kay's Sunday 

Morning. Handel (Overture, 
judas Maccabaeus); Elgar, arr 
Paul Cassidy (Chanson de 

Matin. Op 15 No 2). Drofek 
(Slavonic Dance. Op 46 No 8 ): 
Chabrier (idyfle; Danse 
viBageoise. Pfeces 
pittoresques): Massenet 
(Scenes Pittoresques): Mozart 
(Kyrie in D mmor, K34I1: 9.47 
Artist of the Week. Isaac Stern 
performs Sach (Concertos D 
minor for two violins. BWV 
10431: Weber (VWe nahte mr 
der Schlummer. Leise. leise. 
fromme Weise, Der 
Pretschutzl. 10^2 Composer 
of the Week: Stravinsky (Suite 
No 1 for small orchestra); Ives 


£^‘rf^rt^lSo£w , No 5 in B 7.30 Tender fs the North: Lr«. 

No 3): from the Scandinavian festival 

^L^rt^^Andante). at London’s Bartacan Half 

SSSirStoSmytoEer Helsinki University Chon*: 

LSO under Cdm Da vis. wto 

jSSreLSi Irtak^s. Peter Sale Isokashi. seprano Jorma 

IF ** *?* Hyrminen. baniene. perform 

'ZV'frL Reoroe Sbetius (kutiervo Svmphony. 

12 M SpWt of the Aw- 0 p 7. Rrtondia) 

9-00 Sunday Play — Critics’ 

Mark Ajn^W ^ ^ ^ Choice. Tot and Viv M»*oei 

1 to5 Table Talk S History ot ™ Hastmgs’s play charts the 

1 H ho haner disastrous marriage of T 3 

• C . H 9S^ ?n tt^che^f 001 ^ Haig-Woc-d 

not to listen tottiBcneOTUuy y7ith John Dunne and Miranda 

nonsenS ^^?f^d^ Rchar>dson 

3 re ^S! 10-55 Music )n Our Time David 

Osmorxf-Srmh presents a 
toast beef The nui^-ai portrail ol Franco 

DonaJoru in the ftrsf of four 
looking far Iheeato s ecu oe programmes Irom the 1992 

f 00 * Huddersfield contemporary 

there is a muse (estival Nkuw 

fetishfelj fts proof^wes Ensemble under Ed Spaniard 

previotsfy urtmowi sonnw performs Rfi; Ehvas ruhiger im 

{■'Like tt* ^diUCk. Spin; La Souns 
you l s^is sounre: Retrain 

worn tof-faod 12 . 10 am New Voices of Flamenco. 

Codpw^. Ramdn El Portugute. Carmen 

' /9t30n 01 H ^i would Linares. El Potto and Antonio 

„ « e .u THOMSON AND GIUJAN MAXEY 

COMPggj ggg'fgg WAYMARWRADIO CHOICE PETER DA VALLE 


wh The A Team (7677) 2J0 Snot*® 
1642760 5.00 House Style (1 457) SJ304M 
Coronation Street ( 268Sin. 12J0 Clue N^4 
172632001 12-35 Moloispon Spec-al 
(9C6S674) 1 jo Film- Whai's Good (or me 
Goose (6196201 3 SO P«* ol ihe Wed-. 
(402603031 3-50 The ITV Chart Show 
(8831303) 4.50-5-30 JoOfM® (1648741) 

HTV WEST 

As London except: 2JD0 Snooker (d56E44| 
5.00 Art Imitation to Remember (Lasfc? 
Phillips) (1457) 5-30-6-00 BUseye (612) 

SCOTTISH 

As London except 1045 Glen Mtcr-aeTs 
Cartoon Cavalcade (521506) 11.15 La* 
12571032) 11.30-12-00 Sunday Service 
(7235) 12.30-1-00 EJkon (4337411) 2.00 
Snooker 1641032) 4 JO ScxHtish Books (772) 
5.00 Scotspon (7344) 6-00-6^0 NS Speoal 
(5251 1 SL 30 The Twr^hi Zone {7381203) 
1-20 Smocks <3430200) 1 as kopk 
(4602856) 2AS The ITV Chart Show 
183204841 3JS P)c* ol tfw Week 180665754} 
4X0 Quiz Nighl (43488552) 425*30 F4m- 
DJemma’ (7456623) 

TSW 

As London except 12-30-1.00 TSW 
Faming Week (4337411) 230 Ftshenas 
News (695009021 2.15 Snooker (61303106) 
5430 BiAseye 1 1457) smog Cobbtfr 
stonea. Cottarjes ana Castes (6121 12-30 
Ouc Nigm (7263200) 1455 MvXorsport 


rotten m the steak ol 
Denmark") 

1^0 BBC Welsh SO under RudcJf 
Barshai performs Verdi 
(Overture. Nabucoaj- Grieg 
(Piano Concerto in A minor: 
Lars Vogt). Brahms 
(Symphony No 4 in E msior) 
2S5 Orlando Gibbons: Fretwork, 
with Paii Nicholson, chamber 
organ, performs the first ol two 
programmes of consort music 
with tte double bass viol (rl 
3-30 Songs of Bffss- Patricia 
Wright, soprano. Malcolm 
Martmeau. piano, perform 
Bliss (Simptes; Seven 
Amencan Poems: Angefs of 
the Mind, Three Songs, to 
poems by W H. Davies) ft) 
4.15 Mazarfs Vtoifn Concertos 
Camerafa Acadermca of the 
Salzburg Mozarteum under 
Thomas Zehelmair. violin, 
performs Concerto No 1 in B 
fiat, *207; Concerto No 2 in D. 
K211. Symphony No 33 in B 
Rat. K319: Concerto No 4 in D 
5.45 Listening to . . . Baroque 
Opera, with Michael Hall in 
6.30 Raphael Oleg and Pascal 
Rom. violin and piano, 
perform Mozan (Sonara in F. 
K376). Frand- (S*ma(a m A) (r) 
7J3Q Tender fs the North: Lwe 
tram the Scandinavian festival 
at London's Barbican Hart 
Helsinki University Chon*: 

LSO under Colin Davis, witfi 
Sale Isokoski. seprano. Jorma 
Hyrminen. banione. perform 
&be(ius (kuHervo Svmphony. 
Op 7. Hnkmdia) 

9.00 Sunday Play — Critics' 

Choice. Tom and Viv Mrfrioel 
Hastings's play charts the 
disastrous marriage of T 3 
Eliot and Vivienne Haig-Woed 
With John Duttjne and Miran.±j 
Richardson 

10-55 Music In Our Time David 
Osmood-Smtfh presents 3 
rrur3“rai portrail ot Franco 
Donator* in the fust of four 
programmes tram the 1992 
Huddersfield contemporary 
music festival Nkuw 
Ensemble under Ed Spaniard 
performs FiB: Ehvas ruhiger im 
Ausdiuck. Spin; La Souns 
sans sounre: Retrain 
12.10am Now Voices of Flamenco. 
Ramdn El Portugufis. Carmen 
Linares. El Potto and Antorno 
Aguietos 12-3&-1235 News 


Special ( 9265674 ) 1.30 Fara Whai's Good 
lor rite Goose |6 136201 3 - 2 S Pic* ol Ihe 
Week (40260303J 3,50 The fTV Chan :-how 
18831303 ) 4J0-5J0Jodhnder (1648741) 

TVS 

As London except 12.30 TVS News 

(117418070) (Cdowed tr, Agenda (57879S2I 
220-5.00 Snc,>s» (*>42761) 

TYNE TEES 

A 3 London except: 12.25-1-00 Wild World 
ol ihe East (55101671 2J» Snooker 1453544) 
5-00 The Bat* Pipe 11457) 530 Annul 
Country 1.612) 6.00-6-30 Bufise/e (525i 
1230 The T*frjhi Zona (63262) 1-00 'Du . z 
Nigtii 1923781 1 30 Pc) oMhe (I 1 EI 61 
230 Karm Bhoonr (81823) 2-30 Zara Dhyen 
Dem (1673-561) 230 F*ti Jews* Thief 
(601272521 5.00-5.30 JoWrdet (50804) 

ULSTER 

As London except 12 30-1.00 Gardenng 
Time (4337411) 2.00 Farnimj UWar f7877| 
230 Snorter if. 42761 j 5-00 Brtseye 11457) 
530-6.30 Coronation Street (26896) 1230 
Quc Night (7262200) 12^ MottrspoA 
Special (9395674) IJO Rim Whafs -lood 
for the Gwse i£ 1 ? 620 i 335 Pk> of me 
Wert <402603031 330 The TV Chan Show 
13395787) 430530 JlttnAi .1643741, 

YORKSHIRE 

As London ex cep t 1235 The LiBest Hooo 
(59298151 1230-1.00 Caierrtai Mere 


(S) Stereo on FM 

5 .55am Shipp«ig Forecast 6-00 
News Brermq. md 6.03 
Weather 6.10 Prelude (si 630 
News. Mominq Has B»o)en. 
ind Belts on Sunday from 
SI Giles Church Bal jerton 
Noftingham^we is) 6.55 
Weather 7.00 News 7.10 
Sunday Papers 7.15 Or Yom 
Farm. Rcberr Forster meets 
Kafy Cropper, shepherdess 
sheep dog irarner and ywmei 
of One Man and H<s Dog 7M 
Sunday 735 Weather 8.00 
News 8-10 Sunday Pap-er? 

8.50 The Reverend Canon 

Geoffrey Brown steals for 
the Werti's G'Xd Cause about 
the Christmas Appeal Fund for 
the poor ana those m need m 
Britam 8-55 Weather 

9.00 News 9.10 Sunday Papers 

9.15 Letter from America in 

930 Morning Service from the 

Chapel oi Wesley House m 
Cambridge 

10.15 The Archers Omnibus (S) 

11.15 News Stand <si 
11.30 Pldc of the Week fsi <rt 
12.15pm Desert Island Discs S>je 

Lawiev's castaway 'Z Carmen 
Callil. the tcurder of the 
feminist publishing he use 
Virago (si 1235 Weather 

1.00 The World This Weekend 
The Prmcess nOyai (airs to 
■Janies Naughue at>jj: har 
wprf. as pres«Jea: of Sa^-e (he 
Children 135 Shipping 

2.00 Gardeners' Question Time. 
Members of the Cui>3Sith 
Victoria InsMuie .0 Cumbria 
put iheir questions 10 ihe 
arper(3.s! 

230 Sunday Playhouse t- f/aner 
oi Se>. b; r J.c ^ Siatford A 
public scandal eiupis -n earl, 

1 9m-cen?jr, London ioJo-'^ng 
the death oi James Although 
manied to Atmgaii. he James) 
'3 discove.-el h be a she Wth 
Anna Savva as James and 
Patricia Hayes and Bull 
as the older end yo-jnger 
Atvgail lei in 

330 The Radio Programme, with 
laune Tavicr 

4:00 News; Analysis Melan# 
Pidiips considers the penis lux 
D’jiic-f-nv^.ers of ign jrmg 
Britain's underclass iri 


1117744901 2.00 Snorter 1458544) 530 
Ammal Corny (1457) 530 Bdiseye (612) 
6.00-630 Calendar 15251 1230 The Twiighi 
Zone The World Non Dx* (72®S7t> 1.00 
Guc Nighi (9237B! 130 Pirt oMhe Wort 
(674)465) 230 Karm Bhoom (1101303) 
230 Zara Dhyan Don (1629561) 235 F*n 
Jowyi Thief iVSfay An and VftMrub -^nri 
Mahendrai (69)27262) 530330 Johiude. 
(50004) 

S4C 

starts: 630am Trans Wend Sport (43780) 
7.00 Take 5 (26198771 735 Laurel and 
Haioy 17904877) 735 Lime Wizards 
(9997761 1 8.00 Sandrtan (46631) B30 
Wish KxJ (14093221 835 friin (2875254) 
93S Laud and Hardy 156727091 830 
Denn>s (8134877) 9.45 M fa coleus MeBops 
1538886) 10.15 Happy Days (520877) ia<5 
Voyage to me Sottam of (he Sea (3120701 
11.45 Liltie House on Ihe Prame (318254) 
12*5 Scared Plaen / 1 187990) J.10 MagK 
Roundabaji 111712836) 1.15 Fooitwl Itaia 
IB00C&M7) 330 r-fan Ealing Tpere >92273) 
430 DcsmonQ's (902) 530 Dschrau Canu 
Dechrau iCan nu (90991 530 PoPol Y Cvrm 
(926CS2351 735 Hob Hwn A Hoii LlaH 
(9337801 8.00 Pns V Farchnad (1709) 930 
He) Strewn (7612) 930 Ne-i^drtxi 
1 7030611 935 Sam Dwnod Ar Y Sul 
(568438) 9-50 Aetier.r (7123815) 935 4m«n- , 
can Footoall IB2S4612) 1130 The Prisoner 
133163 1 11220 Hgh Merest /S8XBS31 1.0S , 
Owe 1 


4.47 Treasure islands 

Paperbacks for Christmas 

5.00 News; Sue Unto bi 
Ozleworth (s) (r) 

S JO Poetry Please] Ann Ovyd. 
shadow hanlaijo minister, 
selects her favo=jnte poem (sj 
5.50 Shipping 5J58 Weather 

6.00 Six O'clock News 

6.15 Feedback (r) 

6.30 Europhile (r) 

7.00 The Best of Fear on 4: 
Survival, by John Wyndham. A 
maner of life and death turns 
to honor m space is) I r) 

730 Bookshelf is) (rj 

8.00 Punters 

• CHOICE Whai began as an 
eypenment m community radio 
— the listener supplies the 
idea, the BBC the professional 
Ijicw-bow — has earned rts 
permanent place in the 
schedules Tonight's edition is 
ctiaiacienslically entertaining, 
provocative and concise. Item 
number one reports on (he 
campaign to get justice for a 
piled man who protests that 
he is innocent of the cm* oi 
conspiring to cause GBH to 
his former girl friend. Item 
number two is about what is 
clamed to be not only Bntaiii & 
but the world s fast open-aii 
tiee-sianding condom vending 
machine Both pro and anti 
cases are cogently argued (r) 

8-30 Reading Aloud: No Fur. No 
Feathers. The actress Caroline 
Biahsiort tells Ihe story of her 
•asu to Taganrog. Chekhov's 
birthplace, and her role as the 
rtxenmc governess in The 
Chem, Orchard 

9.00 The Natural History 
Programme (rl 

9. JO Special Assignment 10 9.59 
Weather 10-00 News 

i u. 1 b A Search for the Spanish 
Soul Jen Sutton examines 
how (he Catholic church has 
hued in Sp«ain since Franco's 
death in 1975 

1 1.00 in Committee 

1 1.30 Seeds of Faith. Canon Jonn 
Young. York Diocesan 
Evangefisi. with his reflections 
lor Advent Is) 

12-00-1 3.43am News, ind 1220 
VTealher 1233 Stepping 12-43 
World Service (Lw only) 


SATELLITE 


SKY ONE 

6.00am Hixr of Plmei (685421 7-00 Ftxi 
Factory (7348525) 1130 The World Tomor- 
row (288151 1230 Lost n Spaoe (85032) 
130pm UK Top 40 04780) 230 Trapper 
John 138341) 330 BgfU s Enough 00631) 
430 Hotel 116438) 530 AS American 
Wresting 15430) 630 Gwwig Paws (3709) 
630 The Simpsons (7761) 730 The 
Smpsors (6107i 730 21 Junp Street 
(28148) 830 Flesh and Blood (15877) 1030 
| Entertamment Torvgfti (75525) 1130 Sytea 

SKY NEWS 

Twenty-four tour nwrs service 

SKY MOVIES +■ 

830am Showcase (854S0) 

830 Hefto Down There (1969) Gju eay 
abouf a lamfly hmg mderwafer (27893) 
1030 Going Under (19901 Navy par-xly 
sramriq Bii Puftnan (SC-41 1) 

1230 National Lampoon's ChnetmiBi 
Vacation (1989) Seasonal comedy stomng 
Crwry Oom (405*4) 

2.00pm The Bride in Black I ludui Su&ai. 
Luca's husband OavxJ Sou & hiBed their 
wedrtig day (492641 

430 Emasi Goes to JaB (tVSOi* Comedy 
mrsawentures siamnfl Jvn Vamey- «h0 
finds hriBsiI cm death iw (10506/ 

530 xpoture FSm news (1964) 

630 Ernest Saves Christmas j 1388) Jim 
Vamey reams up with an aging Santa Claus 
» reaWirn the Yuleude Spirit (29430) 

8.00 Nothing But Trouble (1991). Antaico 
tor sceedrig, Chevy Chase and Derri Moore 
Eland tnal beiore mdge Dan Aykroyd (31235) 
1030 Roboeop 2 (1990). Peter Water 
returns as (he cyborg ixHceman (14070) 

12.00 Presumed innocent (l 990): Homaoi 
Ford a axused ot rapng and muntemg 
Grrta Scaachi 1346729391 

2-20am Bottiuns — TTre Ualdng oi a Haro 
(19901 Bopc ol »to Ganadran doctor who 
oecame a lavoUicnary hero in Chna 
Siamrg Donald SUtoriand (513842) 

4.15 Burning Bridges (I960) Las 
endeavours to Veep romance alive -men N«rt 
Maicuso (23*804). Ends ar 5.45 

SKY MOVIES GOLD . 

4.15pm The King and I (1956) Muacajwiih 
YuiBrymerasitKkjngol Sra m and D aiorah 
r err as an English goixjirisss (BS73 1 7801 
6.30 The Adrenturee ol Bheriock Holmes 
1 19391 Bas4 aatibone varr. as Ihe Baker 
Strwa deiecuve 171525) 

830 Class ot 44 ( 1973)- Sequel 10 Summer 


of 4 2 charing ihe experiences o> three 
friends tiffing the second world war (35099)- 
1030 Tad Driver (1978) Martin Scorsese's 
drama stamng Robert De Kiio as a VMiam 
veteran (85506). Ends at 1130 

THE MOVIE CHANNEL 

730am Rich and Strange <1932. tyw) 
Hichcock drama about a co uple who 
er*arfc on a world aitise (56893) 

930 Boy. DU 1 Gat a Wring Nuipber 
(1966): Estate agwo Bob Hope becomes 
imatad with B-a Summer 145099) 

11.00 Frankie end Johnny (1966)- Bos ' 
Pnestoy mu8Kra) (58709) 

130pm Bandas of Corsica (1953) Two , 
brothers dnmpt 10 bring home ntia to 
Cornea, staring Achanl Greene and 
Raymond Bun (48815) 

330 Lowe Story 11970) Weepte writ Ryan 
O'Neal and An MxGt»i (38235) 

630 S to o p i ng Beady Oassc (axy-taie 
stamng Beverty D'Angelo (68877) 

730 Problem CriU (1990): A collate 
adopts rrsscNawxK Mcfaef Otoer ( 70273 ) 
930 Steeping WWi the Enemy (1991): 
J3a Roberts talas her deah to aecape 
vtaleni husband Ptenck Bergki (38148) 

17.00 A Rage Jn Harlem ( 1991 )' Conedy- 
thrilerwah Forest Whkaker (527457) 

1235am She Said No (1990) Date rape 
drama starmg Varorrtca Hamd (9567$) 

2-35 Pro ph ecy (1979): Tone waste creates 
loner mutants (*8455113) 

530 The Jofcar is Wild (1957) : Musicri 
tropic of nightclub entertainer Joe E lams 
05817281). Ends al7.15 

SKY SPORTS 

630m Fishxtg ihe West (53032) 730 The 
Use League (49493) 9.00 Jack H*p (61612) 
1030 Goete on SiXKtoy (8*490) 1130 
Survhre) ol Ihe Rttect (49700) 11J0 ugh 
Are (57709) 1230 WWF AMmerican 
Wresting (4881?) 130pm FA CLp Second 
Bern) (841070) 330 FA Prarrwr LaaguB. 
MaxJwster Utd v Mandiester Cfay (B3ffi35) 
630 Talkback (44896) 730 German Focibafl 
(96235) 930 Dubai Rutfoy Sews (85467) 
1030 FA Cup Football (50896) 1230- 
2.00am FA Premier League- Manchester Ud 
v Manchester Ctty (58484) 

EUROSPORT 

830am Step Aerobic* (67885) 830 
Euroscores Magazine (17326) 930 Tarns 
Davts Cup Final (83*571 1130 Ski Jumpng 
(92167) 130pm Trans World Spot (59728) 
230 woman's HandbaB (70708) 330 Figure 
Skating (95815) 530 Euoscores Magsine 
(5534506) 536 SW JUmptog Ylfartd 0(0 
(5114419) 830 Boxing (39984) 730 Terns 
(5538167) 1030 Bxosooras (227419) 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1: l05»:Hir285m.lCia9kHz/27Srn. FM-97 6^98 
Radio 2: FM -83-99 2 Radio 3: FM-902-92 4 Radio 4: l98f.Hi'1515m. FM- 
924-34 6 Radio 5: «3frHzr43Jm: g09kH?/330m LBC: llS 2 kH 2 ,' 26 im. FM 
3r 3. Capital: 15*^ Hi 134m: FrJl-95.8. GLR: 1458kHi'206m; FM 94.9: World 
Service: MW &J8^'465m Classic FM: FM- 100- 1 02 


FIs aieitu arid MtW. 430801 Nsaia James (FNI 
only until 630am) 730 Gary Darias 930 Daws 
Lee Travis 1230pm Pick of the Pops: Top 20 
charts of 1967. 1976 ato 1968 230 Ftortk* Toda/a guust is Del Amtoi 430 The Constate 
UK Top JO 7J00 Pete Tong's FssentMl Selection 830 Anne N tgfn tiga teS Request Stow 
1030 Gary Daws iFM only after 1230) 1 30-430am Lynn Pareima (F«* only) 

FM Stefeu. 4a»em Bwbda Siugeca. 730 
Don Maclean srys Good Mamng Surky 938 
^3hn Sachs presents Much More Muse 1230- 
730pm Tto Vintage Years- Desmond Carreigton w4h Ratio 2 AB-TYna Greats. 230pm 
Benny Grean. 330 Atari Dan mth Sounds Easy 430 A Tenor Sang- Jues Bfaafing — The 
Migtity Swede 430 Sng Srmetfvng Sxnole. 530 Charbe Chaster unto Swday Soaptx* T3o 
Ftenard Baker nth Udwfes kx You 830 Sunday Had Hour 830 Alan kwh w«i You 
Besl Tunes 1030 Rario 2 Arts Programme. Ihe Me and work, of the songwriter 
Jr-rvnv Kennedy 1235am hficfc Barradoughs New Coixtiiy ( rj 130-430 John Terrett 

News and sport on the how MI 230pm. 
630me World Service- World News. 639 
Mews About Brrian: 615 Caribbean Magadne 
630 Mart Cuiv's vroekeiO Eckrcn 930 We Are MesquaMe We Are One. by Hadley tom 
13,171 1030 Jotonte WaB-er with The AM ADemanve Ormtous 1130 Fantasy Footed League 
1 230pm Stmdav Bonchl AO Open Ftrum 230 Arvmal Ta*. (rt 230 The Mart Sled SoUton 
in 330 Sunday Spat FoalMi —Manchester United v Manchester City 630Wfctfar‘sWtoeidy-. 
Lynda Lrw Potwr €JO Fdocanon Matters Id 7-15 How Wo Lived TTwi Firerafc 730 
tratoressno 600 Rcsiart French 830 Oeutcch Express 930 Open UniMany 930 CL4i 
Class I>) -10.10 Across the 1130 Sport 1230-12.10am News. Sport 

■nflHHgMMroro AD tvnee In GMT. 430ms Worts Busmess 

Rpnew 430 Travel and Wither 4^5 Prtfl- 
remmes n German 530 EuopeThs weekend 
535 European Sports News 5-59 Woatiici 630 News 615 Letter Iron Amotoa 830 
fftoqramrrtes in French 7.00 News 730 From Our Own COrreapondert 730 Wrae On 830 
fttews 839 Wfcxtts ol Fanh 615 Classics wxh Kay 930 News 936 World Business flews* 

615 Seemp Stan 930 Foft «7 Bnian 935 Spcrt 1031 Sosnoe m Adtan 1030 to Ptoee ot 

God 1130 News 1139 Travel 1130 BBC Engfctii 1135 News and BrtBh Press Hevew n 
Gertr«on 1 231 pm Play at me Weefr- The Winter Wife 1 30 News 231 Out ol Ax 230 Anytiwu 
Goes 3.00 Ngwc 615 Concert Hal 430 News 43B Nows About Bhtaln 4.15 BBC ErtfBh 
430 Programmes In German 530 News end Bustftess Review 5.15 CUti 848 530 
Programmes r Fi trust, 630 IWjws 630 Pugrawias in German 600 News 839 Mt n 

Bntam 835 Words ct Faith 630 Europe Tonght 93D News 1 616 Merefaan 1 035 Span 1 1 .00 
Nems 1135 WarW Buwwss flewew 11.15 Oassts wKftJCsy MMnftflt News 1230m (n 
Prase ol God 130 News 131 The hrertxxi ot Tiodxion 136 Jerome Kam Among FnendS 

2.00 News 23D Composer of too Morvr Sr Mchori Tnaeti 930 Non 339 Nmo About 

9nlan 615 Sporto Rarxlup 330 Anyftng Goes 430 None 4.15 On Screen 

6-DOBm Saah Luue 930 Ctauk. ruowux.' 

12JM 00 230pm Ceiebnty Ctotee 

330 Rttoert Book 730 Aifltatt; Peribr- 
muircts 830 Classic FM Ctrosi Bmnai Quartet and AfchaeJ thonpson, Firtxii tom. 
indudos Mazan (Horn Quntei n E US. WOT); Dvorak iStimg Quartet No 12 41 F. Ajnancsfl 
1030 &mdjy Night '>ji 11.00 Cortamporaiy Oas$» 123U-630wi AncW Lew 


1035-1230 Terara Daws Cup (297D72S) 

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630«mNFL In Review (50S0Q 630 Grindto 
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(4816083) 1030 Pro Box (91631631) 1T30 
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(83418) 930 Grinfig Gtebte Adwntura 
Sprat 0032} 630 no Nek (82708) 430 
flm (4085525) 430 Swig (48729896) 839 
Macau Toramg Cara (70323S) 750 Sfcrog 
(585525) 930 Top MMch Feats* (78322) 
11 30-1 30am US PGA Go# (67032) 

LIFESTYLE 


(52815) 130 VIMe Shadow (70373229 1-55 
Rails (1532457) 230 Spain Spain Jntema- 
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World (8380212) 930 Make Room for Oadty 
(7167) 430 Americxi Gemestows (27780) 
530 W* with Yto (6438) 030 Sa*»Vlston 


(0696544) 1030 Jukebox Music Videos 
(8066896) 230-330am Top Rve (09736) 

UK GOLD 

638am Rainbow (10005683) 616 Jamb 
and tiw Magic Toreh 1 10000148) 630 
Dangermouse (2757720) 730 Lease 
(2118709) 730 DM TV (2128644) 830 
CDocky's ChaBenge {8034051} 830 
Ranutfroat (2033322) 830 Dr Who 
(2758457) 1130 Rhc The Fastest GraiAttw 
(1956. bfi>) Btamng Gtenn Ford (3367273) 
1230pm F8m. The Lady Wants Ma rk (1953) 
starring Dennis OTCaMa (9777383) 230 To 
Ihe Manor Ban (330327$ 930 The Brt 
(7^81904) 615 Vanity Fair (3809 JOK) 630 
The Dstrict Nose (3395254) 730 Sony! 
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(3391438) 830 Rht Perry Masai — The 
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938 Shadows of Du Heat (91037B11 1138 
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In Conceit Tina Tbmer (63803562) 


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18 


REAR VIEW 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 5 1 992 


Nostalgia at the 
push of a button 

Nigella Lawson praises the BBC for allowing viewers to wallow 
among the televisual Rembrandts and Chippendales 


E Mn IN THE new mar- 
keting argot adopt- 
j&V ed by the BBC. The 
1 Antiques Roadshow 
tVj would, I suppose, 
B I count as a "classic" 
I I of broadcasting. It 
thrived on the belief 
that everyone has some apparently 
worthless object hidden away in the 
attic that would, once Arthur 
Negus had blown the dust off it 
ana polished the maker’s mark on 
his jacket sleeve, be discovered to be 
worth a fortune. And now h turns 
out that the BBCs own attic is fill] 
of the televisual equivalent of the 
lost Rembrandt and the Dulux- 
oovered Chippendale: its collection 
of 1 20,000 old programmes. 

These represented, according to 
Panorama last Monday night, the 
“gold mine” thar could save the 
BBC In the past, the BBC vaults 
were considered to be full of 
nothing more than summer- 
season repeats sold on the desper- 
ate promise of “another chance to 
see”: at best, they made for cheap 
programming, a respectable if 
unimaginative way to coast along. 
Their value, if it was seen to exist, 
was by default stopgaps maybe, 
nice tittle earners never. Now. 
restyled as classics, they are the 
basis of a whole new channel. 

UK Gold, the cable and satellite 
station which started a month ago. 
and which was at the nub of this 
week’s Panorama, has no news, no 
documentaries, none of the public- 
service programming that is the 
mison d'etre of the BBC What it 
has is 20 hours a day of BBC and 
Thames TV repeats. It also has 
something no other BBC station 
has: advertising. 

Melvyn Bragg, wearing his edi- 
tor-of-The-South-Bank-Show hat — 
Le., foe guy from Independent 
Television who provides the sort of 
programmes the BBC pats itself on 
the back for making — claimed 
foul. He swung a new tine in 


TV REVIEW 


support of his insistent and increas- 
ingly convincing plea that perhaps 
some of foe money from foe licence 
fee should go his and other 
independent companies* way. 
There is hardly enough advertising 
to sustain the existing 1TV chan- 
nels, was his argument, and there 
will be even less if stations part- 
owned by the licence-funded BBC 
start creaming any of it off. 

If foe BBC is allowed to get 
money from advertising, why 
shouldn't the independent chan- 
nels get some of the public funds? 
After all, fair's fair. John Birt 
benignly disagreed- There was, he 
stud, “utter disproportion" in an 
this: the £1 million that UK Gold 
was likely to net the BBC over the 
next year was hardly big bucks — 
“modest compared to the great 
sums that flow into the coffers of 

mr. 

There is obviously a difficulty 
here. Peter Brooke, the heritage 
minister, owned up to the unlikeli- 
hood of foe licence fee rising in foe 
near future, and if in this near 
foture the BBC will drop cheap 
imports and inexpensive formulaic 
programming in pursuit of “dis- 
tinctiveness" (and what else, frank- 
ly. should the BBC be pursuing?), 
the money has to come from 
somewhere. UK Gold may be the 
vulgar money-grubbing villain of 
the piece for some, but for others it 
must seem a timely act of initiative, 
an attempt as Panorama soberly 
suggested, “to liberate the BBC 
from the narrowing base of foe 
licence fee". Mr Brooke stayed 
neutral: all he could really say was 
that “in personal terms" he was 
glad, “because I must own up to a 
liking for archival material". 

I must own up to a liking for 
archival material, too; since UK 
Gold started I have watched it 
more than any other station. 1 must 


also admit that I’ve never been 
satellite television’s greatest fan: 
bad US imports, cartoons, phoney 
wrestling and sports stations 
packed with such as the Dutch 
women’s tenpin bowling heats 
have so far made extra-terrestrial 
viewing so much television for foe 
dim-witted. 

OK, so there’s CNN and Sky 
News, too, but I’ve yet to be 
convinced they are foe boons to 
civilisation their supporters claim 
them to be. Until now, I have 
rather sympathised with my grand- 
mother’s tine on the whole busi- 
ness. When asked whether she 
would like a satellite dish “to 
augment her choices”, she replied, 
sensibly enough, that there were 
already four channels with nothing 
on she wanted to watch, why 
should she want 40 channels with 
notiiing on either? 

The choice, however, was made 
for me, and there I was, stuck with 
it I had a bit of fun with Rai Uno 
for a while: even if it is rivetingly 
bad, it is at least in Italian, which 
helps. And one can at least fed one 
is being educated, even if the 
entertainment factor is on the dire 
side. But the whole idea of niche 
marketing for television is distress- 
ing. 

P art of foe joy of television is 
in its variety, and thar vari- 
ety does provide a useful 
service. If you watch a 
game show and then hang around 
to watch a documentary you might 
not otherwise have thought you 
wanted to see. you might gain 
something, [fs a bonus. The 
Reithian legacy is too valuable to be 
cast aside, however much fashion- 
able opinion may noisily hold to the 
contrary. But a separate little niche, 
a separate channel, for repeats: 
there is sense in that 
There is also a great deal of 
pleasurable wallowing. For there 
are few things more suited to foe 



gratification of nostalgia than tele- 
vision programmes. And a day’s 
viewing — take Monday’s for 
example — that takes in early 
Neighbours (Jason and Kytie be- 
fore they grew up and hit the big 
time). EastEnders (remember Den 
and Angie?), Dr VV7io in the dark 
ages with William Hartnell, Terry 
and June, Shoestring (Trevor Eve 
at his most roguishly appealing), 
After Henry, Dallas (before JR got 
shot), The Duchess of Duke Street 
and The Bill, is enough to turn 
anyone into a couch potato. OK. so 
the programmes tend to get repeat- 
ed so often that fay foe end of the 
day you’re word perfect on foe 
script of The Bill, but thars only a 
minor drawback. 

If s interesting to see, toa how 


programmes have changed. Com- 
paring an early EastEnders to the 
dick programme it has become is a 
lesson in foe evolution of soap. The 
UK Gold version is rough-edged 
and fumbling: characters seem to 
wait a good minute between lines, 
the plot creaks along. The up-to- 
date BBC offering has everything 
cracking along, fast and angry. 

S oap operas are meant to 
cement with the viewer 
some idea of foe family, of 
belonging to it, and I have; 
rather sheepishly, to own up to 
feeling rather as if I were being 
shown old home movies of family 
friends as I see a young Sharon 
pouting because Angie wont let her 
stay out until 1 1 o'dock. or a spotty 


teenage Ian sobbing on his nan’s 
knee because Pete's been teasing 
him about wanting to learn how to 
cook. Was it only so few years ago? 
H avert they all grown up so fad? 

Some programmes, tike Casual- 
ty, have since done a bit of tinkering 
with their image. The comic de- 
ments have all out been done away 
with (along with some of die 
agitprop), and why. even Nurse 
Duffy’s tost her West Country 
accent Reginald Perrin is as good 
as I remembered. A Very Peculiar 
Practice even better. Conversely, I 
watched The Goodies or The 
Young Ones in disbelief: I used to 
laugh at this, this rag wed: on 
videotape? 

UK Gold’s press release, issued at 
its launch, made much of foe fact 


that recession has boosted televis- 
ion viewing figures, and in truth, 
there is a slightly recessionary feel 
to foe channel Not so much be- 
cause of the bread-and-circuses 
dement — undeniably there — but 
so far, at least, it is a bit of a job lot 
There is a hint of unspoken 
streetside bartering: Dai and 
Angie, The Bill, not once, not twice, 
but three times dartin’, and foryou, 
love, at no extra cost, go on, treat 
yourself, just sit yourself down and 
make yourself comfortable. But 
even die BBC is made of more than 
soap operas and sitcoms, and if UK 
Gold begins to dip more sdectivdy 
into its archives, it may soon 
provide some of the consistently 
best viewing, or rather reviewing, 
on television. 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 2963 



ACROSS 

I Unforthcoming (8) 

5 Pigeon pea (4) 

9 Blind writing system (7) 

10 Correa (5) 

11 Saw cur (4) 

12 Enduring (7) 

14 Inn (6) 

16 Important man (3,3) 

19 Hanging curi (7) 

21 Slash (4) 

24 Little island (5) 

25 Tyro (7) 

26 Happy (4) 

27 Wake up bugle (8) 

SOLUTIONS TO NO 2962 


DOWN 

1 Deep red (4) 

2 Banquo rank (5) 

3 Summon (4,3) 

4 Irritate (6) 

6 Path gravel (7) 

7 Lawsuit party (8) 

8 Scallopped-edge knife (4) 
13 Very hungry (8) 

15 Cooking pod (7) 

17 Ungrateful person (7) 

18 Machine gun from air 
( 6 ) 

20 Plaster wood strip (4) 

22 Puff up (5) 

23 Arboreal plant (4) 


ACROSS: I Quietude 7 Tucks 8 Intrusive 9 Red 
10 Bait 1 1 Betray 13 Entice 14 Unique 19 Douche 
20 Pill 21 Oar 23 Laborious 24 Slice 25 Harmless 
DOWN: 1 Quibble 2 Intrust 3 True 4 Drivel 5 Scary 
6 Aside 7Terrine 12 Scruple 1 5 Quixote 16 Enlists 
1 7 Phobia 18 Bossy 19 Druid 22 Grim 


1’ • V > WINttiWSMQVE .y : j 

By RAYMOND KEENE, Chess Correspondent 


This is a variation from the 
game Sher — Smagin, For- 
eign & Colonial Hastings 
Masters 1990. Black has 
sacrificed a piece and forced 
the white king into a tight 
comer. How does he now 
complete the rout? This year’s 
Hastings tournament fea- 
tures the Hungarian prodigy 
Jud.it Pol gar. Further details 
from the British Chess Feder- 
ation on 0424 442500. 

Send your answer on a post- 
card with your name and 
address to The Times, l 
Pennington Street. London 
El 9XN. The first three 
correct answers drawn on 
Thursday next week will win 
a Batsfbrd chess book. The 



By PHILIP 



answer and foe winners will 
Ire printed in The Times on 
foe following Saturday. 


Solution to last Saturday’s 
competition: 1 ... Qxh3+. The 
winners are W. Laurie. En- 
field; V.Y. Zamvar, South- 
ampton; R.F. Pallet!. Slough. 



HOWARD 


SPLORE 

a. To torn hay into the sun 

b. Merrymaking 

t The weft of a shoe 
MIXOLOGIST 

a. A mixer of drinks 

b. A polyglot 

c. An aH-roonder 
academically 


SUBR1SION 
a Conspiracy 
k Smiting 

e Being taken by surprise 

HELVE 

a. To dig foe earth 

b. The handle of a tool 
c To divide in half 

Answers on page 2 


Everyone’s a comedian tonight 


• The British Comedy Awards 1992 
( tonight . ITV, 8.05pm) 

Jonathan Ross pronounces on the best of 
the year’s comedy output This year sees a 
supposedly democratic development you 
the viewer can vote for who you want to be 
“top comedy personally. You have till 
9.45pm this evening to phone 0891 
400701 for Clive Anderson, 0891 
400702 for Rory Bremner. 0891 400703 
for Angus Deayton. 0891 400704 for 
Harry Enfield, 0891 400705 for Paul 
Merton, and make your contribution to 
televisual history — if you can be bothered. 

• A Touch of Frost 
(Sunday, ITV. 8.15pm ) 

David Jason appears in a new and rather 
different guise in this feature-length 
police drama, the first in a three-part 
series, in which he plays Jack Frost, a 
rough, tough cop who. underneath a 


TV PREVIEW 


rasping and shambolic exterior, nurses a 
private grief. This straight part is light 
years away from Pa Larkin and Del Boy. 

• Unnatural Pursuits 

(. Monday , BBC2, 9pm) 

The first of Simon Gray’s two-parter 
(which concludes on Wednesday at 
9.3 0pm) in which foe superb Alan Bates 
plays Hamish Partt a heavy drinking, 
chain-smoking playwright who travels 
across America supervising the produc- 
tion of one of his plays, with ludicrously 
funny results. Simon Gray denies the 
piece is autobiographical, though paral- 
lels may be difficult to resist 

• Food and Drink 

( Tuesday , BBC2, 830pm) 

Under foe charming, affable stewardship 


of Chris Kelly, this remains foe most 
consistently informative and entertaining 
food programme on television. This week 
it shows a mini -documentary following 
John Burton Race, who has just come 
back from Madrid, where he won 
unaccustomed culinary honour for Brit- 
ain by coming top in a competition of 
European chefs at the International 
Academy of Gastronomes. The pro- 
gramme also reveals the findings of a 
comparative tasting of cheap champagne 
and sparkling wines. 

• Clive Anderson Talks Bade 
(Friday, Channel 4, 1030pm) 

In the last in what has emerged as a cult 
series. Clive Anderson yaps with the 
American queen of backdiat, Joan Rivers. 
I’d put my money on our bay coming oat 
with fewest scratches. 

N.L. 




“IH watch current 
affairs programmes 
just for work, but 1 
really enjoy watching 
The Clothes Shew 
as I’m an absolute 
pushover when it 
comes to fashion. 
There’s a real feel- 
good factor in seeing 
all that amazing 
haute couture and foe . 
beautiful models. 

You think to yourself, 

‘I might be over 25 
and my bum might be 
halfway down to 
my knees but there's . 
hope yet. . 

• Laura Fitzsimmons is 
president of the National 
Union of Students 



Pretty boys: Manic Street Preachers give deliberately provocative interviews that distract attention from foe music 


O h. these pretty, pretty 
boys in their second- 
hand glamour and 
cheap make-up and Marilyn 
tattoos. The Manic Street 
Preachers preach DIY insur- 
rection for the bored and the 
lonely and the powerless; they 
come from “urban hell” — 
Wales — and they vow "to 
destroy rock ’n’ roll". Well, it’s 
about time. 

Fronted by James Dean 
Brad field, whose strut, choice 
of trousers and scuffed- 
up/coughed-up vocals echo 
Bruce Springsteen, with per- 
haps a hint of TinaTumer. the 
M anics came together in 
1988 — four schoolfriends 
conspiring to bring about the 
Pop Apocalypse in their bed- 
rooms. From the very begin- 
ning. the Mantes had a 
manifesto: rage against the 
ordinary: sexual equality, stay 
beautiful. As the music scene 
at the time was top heavy with 
fiercely “laddish” bands tike 
The Farm and Happy Mon- 
days, the Mantes’ brand of 
glittery androgyny and delib- 
erately provocative interviews 
swiftly earned them bucket- 
loads of controversy, and gi^ 
where the air was alternately 
filled with flying beer cans and 
foe sweaty bodies of loyal fens. 

Richey Edwards is the some- 
times guitarist and ideas 
machine in foe Mantes; he has 
that patented aura of rockstar 
hanging around him, and 
looks like all foe cool members 
of foe Roiling Stones put 
together. Universe educated, 
fearfully articulate and over- 
whelmingly charming and po- 
lite. he sits auied up on tire 
hotel bed and explains the 


Preaching 
revolution 
for real 


Caitiin Moran on a band known 
equally for mutilation and music 


Manic Street 
Preachers’ original 
plan. 

“In foe begin- 
ning. when we 
formed, we wanted 
to sign to the big- 
gest record label m 
the world, put out a 
debut album that 
would sell 20 mil- 
lion and then break 
up. Get massive 
and then just throw 
it all away. By the time we were 
giving interviews and saying 
that to the press, though, we 
didn’t believe it We knew we 
couldn’t quite do that But if 
we had aimed any lower in the 
beginning, I don’t think any- 
one would've paid as much 
attention to us.” 

The Manics have had a lot 
of att ention paid to them. A 
veritable cartload of foe stuff, 
hi May 1991. NME journal- 
ist Steve Lamacq interviewed 
foe band after a gig, and 
remained unconvinced by 
their burning rhetoric and 
hyperbolic proclamations; foe 
Manics were just a Welsh re- 


hash of the Clash 
and. in short. 
Lamacq didn’t 
believe they were 
“for real". Richey 
took a razorblade 
from some place, 
rolled up his sleeve 
anti carved the 
words “4 REAL" 
into his left arm. 

It required 17 
stitches, and the 
pink scar-welts 
across his skinny white fore- 
aim remain as a testimony to 
foe Manics’ utter, consuming 
belief in the band and their 
message, “4 REAL" is a piece 
of rock ’n* roll mythology, up 
there with Hendrix burning 
his guitar, Lennon instructing 
the Queen to rattle her 
jewellery, and Jagger deriding 
to have that fifteenth paisky- 
painred limousine. 

Self-mutilation is a very 
female thing to do: to 
externalise their rage, men 
blame it on someone else. 
Women will internalise then- 
rage, and take it out on 
themselves. "What you say is 

S, 



probably true,” Edwards says. 
"In Wales, foe women are as 
bored as the men. but the men 
win go out to foe pub and beat 
foe s*** out of everyone else; 
foe women will stay at home 
and concentrate on surviving." 

“A kit of girls, of 14. 1 5, love 
foe band.” Nicky Wire, foe 
Mantes’ glamourpuss bass- 
player, says. “I think they see 
us raging on their side, f hate 
men. Males don’t seem to 
have any self-control any 
more something catches their 
eyes and they don’t see why 
they shouldn’t have it" 

The Manics inspire fiery 
devotion in their fens; 
hardcore Manic fanatics re- 
portedly fallow Richey’s lead 
and carve “4 REAL” into their 
arms, toa Of course, all this 
press-perfect controversy 
makes ft stupidly easy to 
ignore foe music. 

Generation Terrorists (Co- 
lumbia Records, all formats) 
released earlier this year, is 18 
trades of crunchy, frizzy power 
chords, riot-inspiring samples, 
lyrics that read like lists of 
Glamorous Rock Things 
which on|y occasionally rhyme 

— sometimes, you feel, aeti- 
dentaliy. Half the tracks aren't 
necessary, but the other 
half... four-minute bursts of 
hunger, and aggression, and 
racked gorgeousness, like 
“Motorcyie Emptiness”, foe 
utterly beautiful strung-out 
ballad-type foingy. “Cul tore 
sucks down words... Hurt 
maim, kill and enslave the 
ghetto/Each day living out a 
lie/life’s sold cheaply Forever." 

The Manic Street Preachers 

— foe first up on stage when 
the revolution comes. 


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